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Windows 7 RC Crashed On Recent Software Install RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have tried rebooting, booting in Safe Mode (all types), Last Known Good Configuration, Disable Driver Signature enforcement, and Repair My Computer.
    None of them worked.
    Every time as soon as my mouse appeared the computer rebooted.
    When I used Repair My Computer it wasn't able to find any problems and I tried System Restore.
    System Restore won't work because it requires me to "Enable System Protection".
    I can't enable System Protection because I can't boot into Windows.
    So I need a way to enable System Protection using Command Prompt.
    Thanks!
    Thursday, May 28, 2009 11:34 PM

Answers

  • Hey Dhanapati & Theproblemfullman, thanks for the replies, I do have a System Restore Image but I'm unsure if it was a backup on OS Visa 32-bit or a beta of Windows 7. I know for a fact it isn't a System Image of the Windows 7 RC. Even though will this work? And I've tried System Image Recovery in the past and I got a message telling me that I need a 32-bit OS to System Image Restore. It tells me to install a fresh copy of 32-bit (doesn't mention Windows 7 or Vista). Reboot my PC. And then to use a 32-bit installation CD instead of the 64-bit I was using. That doesn't make sense. It must be a bug... I'll try burning a 32-bit CD in the morning as the image is already on my other computer.

    EDIT: I've tried the 32-bit but it stills says to put in a 32-bit installation CD.
    Only fix left now is to reformat. :(
    Friday, June 12, 2009 5:34 AM
  • Yeah it's definitely a bug when using Windows Update and/or defragmenting & cleaning the registry.
    I'm not sure but I think it's only happening in x64 editions of Windows 7.
    I haven't noticed any crashes on the betas so it must be just something wrong with the RC.
    Saturday, August 1, 2009 12:11 AM
  • It seems as though editing the registry causes problems.
    When you use a registry optimizer, fixer, and/or cleaner before rebooting after installing an important Windows 7 update, this happens.
    I've tried to locate my problem and I think this was it.
    Tuesday, September 1, 2009 6:08 PM

All replies

  • I have tried rebooting, booting in Safe Mode (all types), Last Known Good Configuration, Disable Driver Signature enforcement, and Repair My Computer.
    None of them worked.
    Every time as soon as my mouse appeared the computer rebooted.
    When I used Repair My Computer it wasn't able to find any problems and I tried System Restore.
    System Restore won't work because it requires me to "Enable System Protection".
    I can't enable System Protection because I can't boot into Windows.
    So I need a way to enable System Protection using Command Prompt.
    Thanks!

    Hi

    If System Protection was turned off then no Restore Points can be created, so it will not do any good to turn it on after the system has crashed.

    It sounds like you have tried all of the available recovery options. You may want to try booting from the Windows 7 installation disk and performing an Upgrade Install.

    This should not affect your installed programs or settings.

    Hope this helps.

    Thank You for testing Windows 7


    Ronnie Vernon MVP

    • Marked as answer by axfelix Friday, May 29, 2009 4:18 AM
    • Unmarked as answer by soccermaniacguy Friday, May 29, 2009 5:13 AM
    Friday, May 29, 2009 3:11 AM
    Moderator
  • I have System Restore options. For example I have dates to which I can restore my computer to because I manually backed it up before installing programs. It's only System Protection that is disabled. That is the only step preventing me from using System Restore because I have a variety of restore points. It's a very peculiar problem.
    Friday, May 29, 2009 5:12 AM
  • I have System Restore options. For example I have dates to which I can restore my computer to because I manually backed it up before installing programs. It's only System Protection that is disabled. That is the only step preventing me from using System Restore because I have a variety of restore points. It's a very peculiar problem.
    Hi

    It certainly is a peculiar problem?

    How are you determining that there are System Restore points available?

    The System Protection component is what controls the System Restore function. It must be enabled for any System Restore points to be created.

    Also, if there are System Restore points that have been created and System Protection is turned off, all of the System Restore points are automatically deleted.

    You can boot from the Windows 7 installation disk and access the Repair Options to get to a command prompt.

    Boot from the installation disk. Select the options just as if you were going to install.

    On the screen, after you select the Language and Keyboard options, look in the lower/left corner and select the Repair option.

    In the Repair Options, select the Command Line.


    Hope this helps.

    Thank You for testing Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Friday, May 29, 2009 5:46 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for the reply. For some strange reason I still have these Restore Points. They are not deleted. And must I boot from the CD? Because I can already access command prompt via the Repair My PC option from Advanced Boot Options after my PC crashes. That is also how I determined I have System Restore points still not deleted. I used the System Restore feature after Repair My PC failed and I can choose a restore point and click next. But the next page states I need System Protection enabled. I haven't recently backed up my files so I cannot just reformat. As I stated in my original topic, I just need a command to enable System Protection via Command Prompt. I am an experienced user and usually troubleshoot my own problems but I cannot find another solution. EDIT: I can provide step-by-step photos to clearly identifiy what actions I am performing for System Restore.
    Friday, May 29, 2009 8:00 AM
  • Thanks for the reply. For some strange reason I still have these Restore Points. They are not deleted. And must I boot from the CD? Because I can already access command prompt via the Repair My PC option from Advanced Boot Options after my PC crashes. That is also how I determined I have System Restore points still not deleted. I used the System Restore feature after Repair My PC failed and I can choose a restore point and click next. But the next page states I need System Protection enabled. I haven't recently backed up my files so I cannot just reformat. As I stated in my original topic, I just need a command to enable System Protection via Command Prompt. I am an experienced user and usually troubleshoot my own problems but I cannot find another solution. EDIT: I can provide step-by-step photos to clearly identifiy what actions I am performing for System Restore.

    Hi

    Sorry for the delay.

    Go to the command prompt in the repair options. Type the following commands.

    net start vss

    Press ENTER.

    This should start the System Protection Service. Type the following command.

    rstrui.exe

    Press ENTER.

    This command should start System Restore.

    Let me know the results.

    Thank You for testing Windows 7


    Ronnie Vernon MVP

    Saturday, May 30, 2009 9:31 AM
    Moderator
  • It says: "The service is not responding to the control function. More help is available by typing NET HELPMSG 2186." It doesn't work.
    Sunday, May 31, 2009 8:47 PM
  • Hello? I really need help. If there's no way to fix my computer I need a way to backup my computer. Somebody please help.
    Thursday, June 4, 2009 5:36 PM
  • I haven't recently backed up my files so I cannot just reformat. ...I need a way to backup my computer.
    If You mean by  "backup my computer" the backup of Your data folders only,
    then there are several ways to do this, depending on Your hdd configuration:
    1) If there exists another partition on Your PC (except this with Win7) with enough free space of it,
    You can move all data folders from Win7 partition to this alternative partition, reformat Win7 partition
    and reinstall Win7 on it. Moving of folders can be done from the command prompt console
    running from installation DVD.
    2) If there is only 1 partition on Your PC (that of Win7) and there is enough free space on it (15--20G), You can  make
    the reinstallation of Win7 on it without reformatting the partition. All files and folders on this partition will be moved
    during the installation inside the folder Windows.old. So nothing will be lost.
    There is an alternative way, to create a new partition (by shrinking the original partition first) 
    before the installation and install the new copy of Win7 into this partition.
    But for the purpose one may be needed much more than 15-20G of free disk space, because
    Disk Manager of MS is not very effective, so that 20G shrinking of the partition may require 2-5 times
    more free space on that partition (depending on its fragmentation).
    Thursday, June 4, 2009 6:19 PM
  • Yes my Windows 7 RC just crashed with the exact same results. I'm getting system restore points listed yet when I choose one under the 'confirm disks to restore' dialog I have the System drive (C:) but under status it says 'you must enable system protection on this drive' and not giving me a way to do this. The 'Next' button is disabled and there is no where to go but back.

    The crash occurred after restarting from a 'Critical Windows' update from windows update.

    I tried the command prompt also but getting 'The service is not responding to the control function' as well.

    This is a test computer and not that important but it did take me many hours of work to get everything loaded and I dread having to go through all of that again.

    If there have been any updates to this thread please let me know.

    Mike
    Wednesday, June 10, 2009 3:23 AM
  • Hong,

    I confirm that this condition is definitely not unique.  I had the same problem.  Further detail: Whereas the Restore Points are listed (indicating that the System Protection and System Restore is ON), the check box for the drive cannot be filled with a check, and therefore the Next box is grayed-out. When trying to fill the check box, the response, 'You must enable System Protection for this Drive' doesn't make sense.

    I couldn't use a Restore Point and didn't have an image of the system to restore. An "in place" upgrade from the install disk wouldn't work either. (Strangely, the software responded by indicating that I had booted from the disk, asked me to remove it and run the upgrade after booting normally; a rediculous suggestion.) Fortunately, I did have one other option: I used the command prompt to go to \Windows\system32\config and found that I had recent backup files for four hives. (My sole hard drive was assigned as drive D: as it turned out.) By renaming the hives to the active files names, my problem was solved.

    My system was built on a clean install of Windows 7 RC (7100) 64-bit, starting five days before the crash that I discussed. My circumstances are not complicated by any upgrade of an earlier OS. My blue screen message was for 0x000000F4, because I used jv16 Power Tools on the registry.

    The only other discussion of this condition with Win7 RC (that I can find) has been in SevenForums concurrently.  That's here:
    http://www.sevenforums.com/general-discussion/12152-system-restore-failed.html  No resolution appears there either.

    So, unless you backed up the hives or have a system image, I don't see a solution, unless some new fix is developed by Microsoft. What I can provide is validation about the circumstances, information on what hasn't worked, clear suspecion that this issue is the consequence of unproven code, and some empathy.  I strongly believe that this is an issue for the new OS that deserves prompt attention from Microsoft. 

    • Edited by Dhanapati Friday, June 12, 2009 3:52 PM
    Thursday, June 11, 2009 11:56 PM
  • I am having a very similar problem. On my case, when comes the "color-changing bar downside the screen", my computer restarts... I will TRY to find a solution for you, why for me, i think i'll never find.
    Thursday, June 11, 2009 11:59 PM
  • Hey Dhanapati & Theproblemfullman, thanks for the replies, I do have a System Restore Image but I'm unsure if it was a backup on OS Visa 32-bit or a beta of Windows 7. I know for a fact it isn't a System Image of the Windows 7 RC. Even though will this work? And I've tried System Image Recovery in the past and I got a message telling me that I need a 32-bit OS to System Image Restore. It tells me to install a fresh copy of 32-bit (doesn't mention Windows 7 or Vista). Reboot my PC. And then to use a 32-bit installation CD instead of the 64-bit I was using. That doesn't make sense. It must be a bug... I'll try burning a 32-bit CD in the morning as the image is already on my other computer.

    EDIT: I've tried the 32-bit but it stills says to put in a 32-bit installation CD.
    Only fix left now is to reformat. :(
    Friday, June 12, 2009 5:34 AM
  • Hello Dhanapati, 

    I am having the same exact problem. Can you please explain the process in detail (What was the Name/Extension of the backup files/hives,  What did you have to rename them to to make them active.) in your statement:

      "I used the command prompt to go to \Windows\system32\config and found that I had recent backup files for four hives. (My sole hard drive was assigned as drive D: as it turned out.) By renaming the hives to the active files names, my problem was solved."

    My problem was created when I ran a registry cleaner which may have created a backup before it ran.

    Thanks very much 

    Gregory I. Hayes
    Friday, June 26, 2009 12:24 AM
  • Hey guys,

    I'm also having the same issue. Mine occurred after a windows update and after I ran a registry cleaner, so not sure which exactly. I've tried everything recommended on this and other forums but it just won't boot, just get the bsod. Do you guys think MS will release a fix? I REALLY don't want to lose all my files

    Goujon945
    Tuesday, June 30, 2009 5:48 PM
  • Hi,

    I have the very same problem, because I made the mistake to let Glary Utilities do a registry defrag.

    I tried to do the net start, but without any luck.

    Are there any new developments on this?

    Regards, Ed
    Wednesday, July 22, 2009 2:06 PM
  • Same exact thing I did.  Glary Utilities !  I finally just re-did my system.
    Gregory I. Hayes
    Thursday, July 23, 2009 3:39 AM
  • I am having same problem... someone please contact me when a solution is found...thanks
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 12:26 PM
  • Same problem here--what the heck is going on?  Only two things I can think that could've caused it on mine is installing AVG or the system update(s).  On my third install right now.
    Friday, July 31, 2009 11:14 PM
  • Yeah it's definitely a bug when using Windows Update and/or defragmenting & cleaning the registry.
    I'm not sure but I think it's only happening in x64 editions of Windows 7.
    I haven't noticed any crashes on the betas so it must be just something wrong with the RC.
    Saturday, August 1, 2009 12:11 AM
  • What all of you could try and I have absolutley no idea if it will work because I just thought of this, I have bean using the "sfc.exe /scannnow" (no quotes) function to repair my installation with a very high success rate and wondered if it can be used with the command prompt after booting from the dvd and selecting the repair my computer option? 
    Saturday, August 1, 2009 6:46 AM
  • What all of you could try and I have absolutley no idea if it will work because I just thought of this, I have bean using the "sfc.exe /scannnow" (no quotes) function to repair my installation with a very high success rate and wondered if it can be used with the command prompt after booting from the dvd and selecting the repair my computer option? 
    This may fix the issue and enable you to load it then, but it's rather troubling this is happening to begin with.  Last night I tried to use my laptop and again found it corrupted such that it wouldn't boot, couldn't automatic fix, and couldn't use the restore points that were staring me in the face.  Luckily I'd imaged the drive earlier so that I could restore from that instead of having to fresh install again but this shouldn't be happening repeatedly.  The only thing I wonder in my particular case is if the new hard drive I have is somehow causing all of this (the old one with the same install on it has no problems if used)
    Sunday, August 2, 2009 2:53 PM
  • Same with me, I have 64-bit edition of Windows 7, and mine failed when I tried to change my computer's SID. I used sfc.exe /scannow and reooted, but I don't really know what to do next.
    Monday, August 31, 2009 3:00 AM
  • It might be a malicious "reboot virus". Try and access the registry from the repair disk and check the run keys.

    Monday, August 31, 2009 3:32 AM
  • It seems as though editing the registry causes problems.
    When you use a registry optimizer, fixer, and/or cleaner before rebooting after installing an important Windows 7 update, this happens.
    I've tried to locate my problem and I think this was it.
    Tuesday, September 1, 2009 6:08 PM
  • windows 7 64 bit
    Yup, i'm having the same problem as well. it just happened yesterday.
    @hong shim: i agree that it's caused by editing the registry but knowing why it happened doesn't fix it.
    If some windows 7 guru could propose a fix it would be appreciated. i really don't want to reinstall windows.
    If nothing else works, would it be possible to reinstall windows then use an old system restore to get my programs running again? 
    Monday, October 5, 2009 5:38 PM
  • It seems as though editing the registry causes problems.
    When you use a registry optimizer, fixer, and/or cleaner before rebooting after installing an important Windows 7 update, this happens.
    I've tried to locate my problem and I think this was it.
    I stay away from registry cleaners myself because they do more harm than good. They claim to improve performance by removing extra uneeded values but from my understanding of how the registry works I don't believe removing extra keys could make a noticable difference in performance or even save disk space. My experimentation with them have caused crashes in the past and in this case may be to blame for the your system restore not functioning.
    Monday, October 5, 2009 8:13 PM
  • I experienced this same problem last night after using a registry cleaner. So far, it looks like I've been able to back up my files using HP's backup program, but it appears the only option is to reformat. My concern is that this problem may happen again, though I will not be using a registry cleaner again, it appears it's happened to some after a normal system update. Is Microsoft either aware of this problem, or is there a fix for it in the works?
    Wednesday, November 4, 2009 8:10 PM
  • Has anyone found a solution for this yet?  I tried a registry optimize/defrag, apparently in combination with a windows update, and my rig is pretty toast right now.  I've got a couple good restore points, but like all the others in this thread, System Restore is claiming that I "must enable System Protection on this drive."

    I'm NOT excited about having to do a fresh install on this machine, and haven't had much luck restoring my registry backups via command prompt - I can get actually get regedit to run from command prompt, but run into a slew of permission issues that I'm not having any luck figuring out.

    So any news on this bug?
    Thursday, November 26, 2009 1:56 AM
  • Norton Utilities blew up my registry on an optimization/defrag/compress, which caused me to have the same problem described above.  I booted up the recovery disc and went to command line. I checked \windows\system32\config and there were two registry hives with "rmbak" extensions... I renamed their corresponding live hive files to a "bak" extension and copied the "rmbak" files back over the live hive files.  This allowed me to boot up successfully.  I was then able to go into Norton Utilites and restore the original registries (don't know if that was necessary but I did it just to be safe).  I then uninstalled Norton Utilities forever.
    • Proposed as answer by Joshua Bailey Friday, November 27, 2009 3:41 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by soccermaniacguy Thursday, July 1, 2010 7:41 PM
    • Marked as answer by soccermaniacguy Thursday, July 1, 2010 7:41 PM
    • Unmarked as answer by soccermaniacguy Thursday, July 1, 2010 7:41 PM
    • Proposed as answer by alb40 Monday, August 13, 2012 5:46 PM
    Friday, November 27, 2009 3:41 PM
  • Hey Josh, thanks for the reply (both here and over on sevenforums).  I've posted more about it on the sevenforums thread.

    I'm with you on uninstalling Norton . . .   never had any luck with ANY of their products.  Poorly coded, bug-laden, memory hogging bloat-ware.  In my opinion.  :)  As for registry tools, the one I liked the best was Advanced Uninstaller, but I got away from it since they didn't have 64-bit support for a long time.  Cleanmypc was the one I tried now, and even though I had huge problems with 4.02, the latest version seems to be working fine.
    Sunday, November 29, 2009 6:10 PM
  • Hi everyone, not sure if this has already been resolved but experienced the same problem after using a reg-cleaner
    on what had been a well-behaved Win 7 64bit until then.  System restore no use although said were available as stated elsewhere in this forum.

    Found my solution on social.answers.microsoft.com http://social.answers.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7repair/thread/64d8fe95-6080-4791-8831-5f775b7ee787 courtesy of "Pegasus" MVP down to paragraph 6 of his explanation of
    restoring the RegBak files - boy was I relieved having no mirror image to restore from (learnt a lesson!)
    Friday, February 12, 2010 12:49 PM
  • Yes I feel that this issue still hasn't been resolved.
    I'm hearing from many different people that this has happened to them as well.
    There is no "real" fix from what I hear.
    Sometimes restoring the RegBak files DO fix the issue but for some there seems to be nothing to do to revive your installation.
    Frustrating enough, for me, every time this happened, Windows 7 recovery disks, command prompts, and image backup restores ALL don't work. =/
    Friday, February 12, 2010 4:59 PM
  • I am experiencing this issue as well.  However, I have not been using a registry cleaner/modifier.  The last thing to happen was a critical update (according to the restore points) last night. I usually leave my computer on. Tthis morning when I tried to use my computer, it had restarted and could not boot. This is strange because I turned the automatic install and reboot off in windows update. I is set to notification only and manual install. there is no correction for this problem?
    Friday, June 11, 2010 11:25 PM
  • WINDOWS 7 HAS A BUG IN THE SYSTEM RESTORE BECAUSE OF THE STARTUP-RECOVERY PARTITIONS

    YOU MUST RE-ADJUST THE DRIVE LETTERS TO GET SYSTEM RESTORE TO WORK CORRECTLY

    Because Drive letter (D:\) is suppose to be C:\, system restore thinks that C:\ has no protection enabled, when in normal boot drive C:\ in recovery is really the SYSTEM volume and not the REAL drive C

    When you correct this, the system restore will run, but hense this buggy problem you may want to try something first before a restore

     

    FIRST:

    go into the CMD prompt using the recovery disk

    type DISKPART

    when you get the prompt DISKPART>

    type in select volume 1

    (enter)

    then type remove letter C

    (enter)

    then type select volume 2

    >

    then type assign letter C

    >

    then again to select volume 1

    and now assign letter D

    once you have done this you can verify the layout (which is how windows 7 is suppose to be)

    Volume 0 F (Repair)

    Volume 1 D (SYSTEM)

    Volume 2 C (HARD DRIVE)

    Volume 3 E (RECOVERY)

     

    then type exit

    now do a chkdsk on C: /F /R

    and throw in a sfc /scannow

    go back to your main screen (recovery options)

    then click on startup repair, this will now make the repair program check the CORRECT DRIVE AND REPAIR THE PROBLEM OR CORRUPT REGISTRY. If it works then it will reboot with no more booting problems, IF NOT then you can certianly do a System Restore without the annoying 'Enable protection' message.

     

    before rebooting you might want to change back the drive letters to how it was booted to

    so drive C:\ should be back to D:\ 

    and D:\ back to C:\ as windows may automatically re-config the partitions on reboot to set it its "normal" if you know what i mean

    Let me know if this worked for you before you delete your drive

     

    Dayton Washington

    bxboy416@aol.com

    AMU/APUS Counter-Terrorism / Intelligence Studies

     

    • Proposed as answer by Davonite Sunday, August 24, 2014 3:25 AM
    Monday, June 14, 2010 3:43 AM
  • Josh's answer is the correct answer for the entire thread.  It is Norton, it is the registry "cleaner" that screws everthing up, and replacing the files DEFAULT and SOFTWARE with their .rmbak versions is the solution.  What a pain in the a$$ this was.  All for a Norton product we actually PAID FOR!
    • Proposed as answer by erhornc Sunday, January 22, 2017 8:13 PM
    Tuesday, June 29, 2010 3:03 PM
  • I don't use ANY of Norton's products.

    It's just "bloat-ware" as I'd like to call it.

    Thursday, July 1, 2010 7:40 PM
  • I remember Norton was a 60 day trial that came with my HP but it wanted to much attention so I'm using free MSSE which detects items. Microsoft has good defenition updates. 
    Thursday, July 1, 2010 8:03 PM
  • Hey fellas, greetings from Brazil :)

    After reading this threat for at least 30 minutes, I found out how to resolve it. It took me sometime to realize

    I had the problem: used a reg cleaner, blue screen on windows 7 x64 startup, tried to restore the system, had the message "You must enable system restore" and bla bla bla...

    Reading again Joshua's comment, I did the same. Step by step, to make it clearer:

    1. Press F8 on system startup.

    2. Select "Repair your system" (or something like that...)

    3. Open the command prompt then go to "\windows\system32\config"

    4. Rename your SAM, SOFTWARE and SYSTEM files by adding the extension ".111" (just an example)

    5. Go to "\windows\system32\config\regback"

    6. Copy the same files (SAM, SOFTWARE and SYSTEM) to "\windows\system32\config"

    7. Restart your system and go playing Halo 2 again... :)

    Thanks for all info guys. Hope it works well for you too.

    Regards,

    Ralph Montelo

    Thursday, August 5, 2010 12:21 AM
  • Hello Everyone,

    I can also confirm that the problem is caused by registry cleaners on Windows 7 X64. In my case it happened with my ASUS laptop which runs Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit edition. I ran Registry Cleaner and had it do a "defragmentation and compression". It told me to restart the computer and when it started my computer was the same as the rest of you.

    After spending 3 days in panic trying to figure out a solution, I finally found one thanks to Ralph and BXboy on this thread.

    First of all the  net start vss and sfc /scannow functions do not work what what did work for me was a combintation of the two possible solutions above.

    First of all, boot up the windows 7 recovery tool with either a boot disk (as in my case because I also accidentially fried my MBR while I was looking for solutions) or through the system startup options. Google Windows 7 64bit boot disk. Alternatively it can also be found as an option in the windows installation cd (repair windows)

    It probably wont detect errors, and if it does it will say that they can't be fixed automatically so what we need to do is go into advanced options so that we can get to cmd prompt.

    Open cmd prompt and do as BXboy suggests to change the drives.

    "FIRST:

    go into the CMD prompt using the recovery disk

    type DISKPART

    when you get the prompt DISKPART>

    type in select volume 1

    (enter)

    then type remove letter C

    (enter)

    then type select volume 2

    >

    then type assign letter C

    >

    then again to select volume 1

    and now assign letter D"

    and then type exit

     

    It wouldn't hurt to also do the chkdsk as he says, but since at this point the C drive and D: drive are reversed and the "System" drive is now the D drive, we should do a check on that drive for integrity:

    chkdsk D: /F /R

    When this is completed, return to the main screen and do the repair again: Most-likely it will tell us again that it cannot complete the repair.

    Now return to the command prompt and type regedit

    Most likely you allowed registry cleaner to store a backup of your registry files before attempting to compress them (it asks automatically). The default where they put the .cab file is in C:\Users\(your user name)\My Documents\backup registry (Date of the backup).cab, but in our case it will be D: drive because the drive letters are temporarily reversed.

    We cant unpack the cab file as it is (that I know of ), but we can use the mini regedit interface to manipulate the file. Select file>import from the window. One good thing about Vista and 7 is that we can copy/cut/move files through any of these windows. Find the registry backup and put it in a usb (selecting move> usb or copy/paste) and then extracting the cab files from another computer.

    Now that you have the folder, you can do exactly what Ralph suggests, but with the unpacked registry cab folder from the backup.

    ". Open the command prompt then go to "\windows\system32\config"

    4. Rename your SAM, SOFTWARE and SYSTEM files by adding the extension ".111" (just an example)

    5. Go to "\windows\system32\config\regback"

    6. Copy the same files (SAM, SOFTWARE and SYSTEM) to "\windows\system32\config"

    but instead of taking from the regback files, you can take from the unpacked cab folder which has  all of the files with the same name. Also its much easier to use the trick where you go into regedit.exe and import to edit the files through that interface. For some reason cmd prompt never gave me permissions to edit the file names, but doing it through regedit.exe and file>import allowed me to change the names no problem.

    then, try rstrui.exe and do a system restore.

    The result is that the drive letter changing fixes the confusion in your system which doesn't allow you to do system restore because of the "protection" problem, and the file replacement puts in a good registry so that we can do the system restore without errors. Doing just one of the two causes problems, but if we do both it works perfectly. If for some reason this doesn't work for you, try to replace the files with the regback files because that is also possible too.

    In the process of trying to fix everything I accidentally corrupted my MBR and i was getting a black screen for start up so I also used the commands:

    BootRec /FixBoot

    BootRec /FixMbr

    and these commands allowed me to boot from the hard drive again. 

    Thanks again for the help,  I never would have fixed this problem without this thread.

     

    Friday, September 17, 2010 10:15 PM
  • kane,  i did everything you said including renaming the drives and extracting and replacing the cab files but when i initiate the rstrui command  it says i dont have any restore points.   they were there before but now they are gone.  in addition, after renaming the drives and doing the chkdsk, therepair utility still says winows 7 on c:    is there any hope?  fortunately i was able to back up files to my external drive using the file import via regedit.thanks to anyone for someinsight       eric
    Thursday, December 23, 2010 9:54 PM
  • I have done just about everything mentioned in this thread, and here I am with the same problem scratching my head hoping for some fairy dust to fall on my laptop and fix it. When I change the drive letters and do a system restore, it fails. When I try \Windows\system32\config, I get an error saying is not recognized as internal or external command... When I try sfc /scannow, I get the "system repair pending" error. I got the error while trying to change the SID, not registry fixing software, so the whole back up registry thing is out of the question. I'm curiosity as.to why I get a drive x, "boot". I can get into the registry but not go through files or anything like that. I haven't been able to back up this system, so I refuse to reformat until I have found a solution or get the files stored in the drive.
    • Proposed as answer by rod-sydney Friday, May 13, 2011 12:00 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by rod-sydney Friday, May 13, 2011 12:01 AM
    Sunday, January 16, 2011 12:40 PM
  • This is my first post.

    I had all the problems above, Win764bit, Norton utilities, dell laptop. (I think the problem was caused by running registry cleanup in the same session as a windows update - thanks Norton). Here's what worked for me (key is to use another machine or installation and "restore previous versions" of registry files):

    -Put the drive with the problematic Win7 install into a working win7 machine as slave drive (or boot to a secondary working win7 installation on the same machine if you have one)

    - Boot to the working machine/installation.

    - Disable UAC on the working machine/installation

    -Ran DISM on the faulty offline drive, not sure if really necessary:

    dism.exe /image:d:\ /cleanup-image /revertpendingactions

    - Use "restore previous version" in explorer. I restored d:\windows\system32\config entire folder.

    - After each restore (there will be at least 1 past version of the registry files/folder for each inaccessible system restore image), attempt reboot to the slave drive/faulty install.

    - If one of your previous versions of the registry folder is not corrupt, one will eventually work on the faulty installation.

    - When I found one that worked, windows rebooted a few times trying to install the update that had contributed to the orginal crash.

    I thought it was in an infinite reboot loop but after 3 reboots windows decided to rollback the change, and my desktop was back!

    This knowledge would have saved me days of effort. Key is, system restore images not accessible from the machine will have their registries visible in a working machine, as previous versions of windows\system32\config and the files it contains.

    In my case I just used one machine, a dell laptop with two hard drives, but you get the idea.

    VSS service runs again once the machine has been recovered as above, couldn't get it to run otherwise.

    Good luck!

    • Edited by rod-sydney Friday, May 13, 2011 3:23 AM typo
    Friday, May 13, 2011 12:20 AM
  • Had the same problem. After reading like 3-4 hours many solution (i thought thgat something else is causing me BSOD) i finally read this topci too. I decided to thank you and post my problem, so if somenone else hase the same problem could find out how to resolve.

    So i had Windows 7 x64. My motherboard is Asus M5A88-V EVo and 2x2GB corsair CMT4GX3M2A2000C8. i know my memory is not compatible with this motherboard, but i still have warenty and i'm too lazy to resolve my problem. every time the 2 memorys are installed i get random crashes (different BSOD, crash with firefox, crc errors on archives and instlalls - happens in ubuntu too) - if someone can tell me a fix for this it will be great. Anyway, sometimes this crashes mess with my registry fileo or some important windows files but system restore works great. until now. i tried system restore but i got this eror "you must enable system protection on this drive". so i installed ubuntu and star reading solution. after a lot of time (and with just only one ram installed, because i know that only one ram wont crash my system) i found this topic. so if anyone else hase this problem, if in safe mode the last file you see is atipcie.sys, the solution is the one from ralph, but more simplier.

    i'll try to be as explicit as i can (my english is t very great if you noticed). use a ubuntu live cd. open youre primary partiton, and go to windows/system32/config/regback and copy youre files default, sam, security,software,system . paste those files in Windows\System32\config and restart normally. that's all. ofc you cand do this in command prompt too but it's more ugly( rename original 5 files from config into something else and then copy those from regback in config file - all with command ren and copy).

     

    Any solution for my memory problem :) ?

    Friday, September 16, 2011 8:45 PM
  • Same issue here, caused by Norton Registry defrag.  Won't ever do that again!  I found the default.rmbak and software.rmbak files in the Windows/system32/config directory, along with the DEFAULT and SOFTWARE windows files.  Renamed the windows files to .SAV extensions, then renamed the rmbak files and the system booted.  Many thanks for the info.
    Sunday, January 22, 2017 8:16 PM