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Slow Login, Welcome screen "hangs" for 30 seconds before desktop appears

    Question

  • I have a slow login problem on two computers with Windows 7 RTM.

    Computer 1:

     - Dell Latitude D620 laptop
     - 2GHz Intel T2500
     - 4 GB RAM
     - Intel 945 Video Card
     - 128 GB SSD
     - Windows 7 Ultimate RTM x86

    Computer 2:

     - Dell XPS 630i
     - Intel Q9300
     - 6 GB RAM
     - nVidia 9800 GT Video Card
     - SATA Hard Drive
     - Windows 7 Pro RTM x64

    The peculiar thing about my problem is that it always takes 30 seconds for the Welcome screen to disappear regardless of the computer. Also, on the laptop, I have the Pandora gadget installed and it will start playing music about 12-15 seconds after I have entered the password but it still takes the full 30 seconds before the Welcome screen goes away. It is as if the Welcome screen is waiting for something to happen before it shows the desktop and it times out after 30 seconds.


    On the desktop, it has happened under the following installation sequences (I've started from scratch reinstalling Windows 7 several times):

    • Fresh install of Windows 7, join to domain, setup domain account as a local admin, install Office 2007 Pro from domain account
    • Fresh install of Windows 7, install Office 2007 Pro as local admin, join to domain, setup domain account as a local admin, restore settings from Windows 7 RC using Windows Easy Transfer
    In both of the above scenarios, it was after the last action that the slow login problem started. It is also worth pointing out that this problem only affects my domain account and not other domain accounts or the local admin account.  I have tried my domain account on a coworker's laptop running Windows 7 RTM and I did not have any problems, so it doesn't seem to be an issue with my domain account. I don't have a login script and I am not using roaming profiles.  Also, this problem did not happen on Windows 7 Beta or Windows 7 RC.  If I logout and log back in with my domain account it takes the full 30 seconds again before the Welcome screen disappears.

    Any ideas or things to try would be appreciated.
    Thursday, August 27, 2009 3:53 PM

Answers

  • The problem is the desktop background.  If it is set to a solid color, it takes about 30 seconds to login.  If I set it to a picture, the login takes about 3 seconds.  It is the strangest behavior, but I have tested it on two computers and it fixes the problem.  If I put it back to a solid color, it goes back to 30 seconds to login.  Several people on another Windows Seven Forums website also confirm this (http://www.sevenforums.com/performance-maintenance/22147-slow-login.html).

    Terry

    • Marked as answer by tburkins Tuesday, September 15, 2009 3:11 PM
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009 3:11 PM

All replies

  • Hi there,
    we do have exactly the same issue. We thought we have it fixed by setting the following GPO to 0 seconds, but now it came back. Can you please check the following setting:


    Set maximum wait time for the network if a user has a roaming user profile or remote home directory

    and set it to 0.

    Thanks


    MS
    Tuesday, September 08, 2009 3:08 PM
  • in general xp does do a faster job in log in
    am 42 with windows xp service community worker
    Wednesday, September 09, 2009 12:46 PM
  • Hello -

    Has anyone found, or implemented a fix for this?

    I am running Windows Server 2008 (32-bit) at home with Active Directory, Group Policy, DNS/DHCP, yadda, yadda, Roaming Profiles and server-side "My Documents" and shares - all configured correctly and working rather well.

    I do this as I have 5 laptops for use among the family members.  Any one member can use any laptop and get their settings and documents upon login.  (I initially log in as each family member to ensure the profile gets established locally and the initial sync occurs).  It also helps when someone deletes something.  I can usually switch off the wireless on another laptop and find the file in the offline cache! :) 

    Basically, all the laptops are now Windows 7, which I must say runs amazingly well even on the older ones (those that used to be **painful** on Vista).  For some reason, the main laptop we use, a Lenovo T61, takes about 20-30 minutes (yes, I said MINUTES) after entering the user name/password to display the desktop.  This is over wireless, right next to the router.  Of course, if I take the laptop to work (wayyyy out of range), the desktop opens in about 30-60 seconds.

    In the first situation, sometimes the hard drive is thrashing, sometimes it's idle.  In the latter, it thrashes all the time letting me know Windows is doing it's thing.

    Any help with a GP setting or verification of the above mentioned would be great!

    Thx!

    Wednesday, September 09, 2009 8:01 PM
  • The problem is the desktop background.  If it is set to a solid color, it takes about 30 seconds to login.  If I set it to a picture, the login takes about 3 seconds.  It is the strangest behavior, but I have tested it on two computers and it fixes the problem.  If I put it back to a solid color, it goes back to 30 seconds to login.  Several people on another Windows Seven Forums website also confirm this (http://www.sevenforums.com/performance-maintenance/22147-slow-login.html).

    Terry

    • Marked as answer by tburkins Tuesday, September 15, 2009 3:11 PM
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009 3:11 PM
  • Can confirm this solid color bug for Danish Vista 64 SP2  too.

    Here is similar report on this forum: WIndows 7 RTM Solid Color backgroud causes login to take almost 45

    Temporary solution until fix if you want solid color could be: You can just make a 1x1 background.bmp in Paint with the color of your desire and tile it as a substitute for Solid Color. This won't give the delay and will fill the background with a solid color.
    • Proposed as answer by Siggimund Thursday, October 22, 2009 5:11 AM
    Thursday, October 22, 2009 5:02 AM
  • The problem is the desktop background.  If it is set to a solid color, it takes about 30 seconds to login.  If I set it to a picture, the login takes about 3 seconds.  It is the strangest behavior, but I have tested it on two computers and it fixes the problem.  If I put it back to a solid color, it goes back to 30 seconds to login.  Several people on another Windows Seven Forums website also confirm this (http://www.sevenforums.com/performance-maintenance/22147-slow-login.html ).

    Terry


    Thanks for the heads up! I purchased a new Intel SSD and was annoyed that the longest part of my start-up time was waiting for the Welcome screen to disappear. This fixed it for me.
    Sunday, January 17, 2010 7:57 AM
  • Hi,

    request the hotfix:

    KB977346 - The Welcome screen may be displayed for 30 seconds during the logon process after you set a solid color as the desktop background in Windows 7 or in Windows Server 2008 R2

    and install it. This fixes the issue.

    André
    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/
    Sunday, January 17, 2010 1:12 PM
  • Hello,

    I have a quite same issue. But all tips I have found don't fix it!

    I have tried :

    - set a jpg image as background
    - install KB977346
    - Local Computer Policy/Computer Configuration/Administrative Templates/System/User Profiles "Set maximum wait time for the network if a user has a roaming...."to 0
    - add a the dword key DelayedDesktopSwitchTimeout set at 5 (works, I have a black screen instead of the welcome screen during 30 second .... fine! xD)

    Finaly I have test a boot in safe mode and : Theire is NO ISSUE in safe mode!

    Then I test a clean boot, but same issue... 30sec in the welcome screen !

    All my drivers are updated

    Any ideas?

    PS : sorry for my bad english! I usually speak in french...

     

    Config :

    OS Windows 7
    CPU Intel i5 750
    Motherboard Gigabyte P55M-UD4
    Memory 3x 1Go Kingston
    Graphics Card Readon 5750

    Case Lian Li V351

    Hard Drives

    1x Kingston SSDNow V+ G2 Series Drive - 64 GB
    1x Seagate Barracuda 7200.12, 7200rpm, 32MB, 1TB, SATA-II

    Saturday, April 24, 2010 12:31 PM
  • New information : I haven't this problem when I'm booting with the guest account!

    Thus I think that my probel is due to something with the admin account! But what??

    I specify that it's a fresh install...

    Saturday, April 24, 2010 1:43 PM
  • follow my guide here to make a boot trace:
    http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?showtopic=140247

    and compress the boot_BASE+CSWITCH+DRIVERS+POWER_1.etl as 7z or RAR and upload it to your Skydrive and post the link here. I take a look at the trace, maybe I see what's wrong with your Windows.

    regards
    André
    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/
    Sunday, April 25, 2010 7:54 PM
  • Hello,

    Thanks verry much for your answer.

    But I have formatted and the problem is now solved!

    I think it was certainly due to an error during my previous installation...

    I noticed that in "control user password 2" my account is now into 2 group : HomeUsers and Administrator. In my previous installation I was only into the "administrator" group... Maybe it's the cause of my problem?!

    • Proposed as answer by Ed LoPresti Thursday, June 30, 2011 2:49 AM
    Sunday, April 25, 2010 10:10 PM
  • I just ran into this same problem.   Normally I click on my User profile at login, and it logs

    in almost instantly (fast SSD for boot drive).  Recently it's been hanging for 20 seconds at

    "Welcome" screen.     When I saw mention of the network timeout above, I realized I had a network

    mapped drive configured, to a machine that is no longer on the network.  It's been trying to reconnect

    that mapped drive every time I login, and that's what the long wait was about. 

     

       ian

    Sunday, May 02, 2010 3:28 AM
  • Not sure if this is applicable, but finding this page and the suggested solution (along with another page regarding bios settings) helped me resolve my black screen "hang."  I'm referring to login time, the time from entering a password to getting to the desktop.  I'm still not as fast booting as I'd like to be prior to reaching the login screen.

    Old boot time (from power off) to full desktop was 2 minutes 15 seconds.  New boot time is 48 seconds.

    First, I made sure my NAS was on which dramatically helped improve login times (as I auto reconnect when the win7 box boots).  This brought my login time down to about 20 seconds.

    Third, I disabled my floppy drive in the BIOS (I don't have a floppy drive).  My machine is homebuilt and for some reason (my own fault I'm certain) the BIOS was telling Windows that a floppy drive exists.  I don't have a floppy.  When I disabled the floppy in the bios my login time went to less than 3 seconds (from when I entered my password to having a fully operational desktop).

    I'm running Windows 7-64bit on a i7-930, 6GB Ram, Intel 80GB SSD Boot Drive on a Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD3R motherboard.

    I'm certain most builders won't have this problem.  But worth looking into if you're getting the long hang time with the blank screen.

    Here's the new boot cycle:  from machine completely powered off to first BIOS screen 14 seconds, to Windows Login Screen 41 more seconds after entering password, 3 seconds to desktop.  Total time of 48 seconds.  I've disabled the Windows screen prior to showing the login screen (in an earlier attempt to get fast boot times).

    Tuesday, May 11, 2010 12:30 AM
  • See Update KB980408 which fixes this problem.

     

    Tuesday, May 11, 2010 3:00 PM
  • Like others have reported, when we login to our Win 7 Enterprise systems, it appears to 'hang' at the Welcome screen.  At first we thought it was our login script, so I enabled verbose logging to see where it might be choking.  Sure enough our login script was hanging when performing two different SQL tasks, which was taking a substantial amount of time.  Once we commented out those two SQL queries, we found the script completed very quickly, however, the Welcome screen remains up between 15-22 seconds.  (Roughly)

    Unlike the KB's, we're not using solid color backgrounds - We're using the stock Windows 7 Aero theme with the Windows logo 'flag' wall paper.

    I typically don't like the shotgun approach of throwing every potential solution I have at a problem; I don't learn anything from that.  Instead, I prefer to take the often numerous steps to isolate the one true working solution, or the winning combination.  I made some quick adjustments to our GPO in the OU where these machines reside but didn't see an improvement.

     

    • Enabled "Do not detect slow network connections"
    • Enabled "Set maximum wait time for the network if a user has a roaming user profile or remote home directory" and set the "Wait for network for maximum (seconds)" time to 0 (seconds).

     

    Below are my findings and were timed using freshly imaged machines after the initial first time logon for profile creation.  (That's always long.)

    Dell Latitude E6410 - Core i5 M520@2.4GHz with 4GB (3.43GB Usable) RAM running Windows 7 Enterprise Boot time: about 15 seconds

    Dell Optiplex 780 - Core 2 Duo E7500@2.93GHz with 4GB (3.25GB usable) RAM running Windows 7 Enterprise Boot Time: about 15 seconds

     

    • After registry fix: 13 seconds.  3 more reboots: 14, 12, 13
    • Unable to apply KB977346
    • Unable to apply KB980408

     

    So there appears to be a slight difference, but its not night and day, and I hardly consider it an improvement.  Are there any logging tools for Windows 7 that can time the boot process and the login process (separately)?  How long it takes for each service, program, policy to run etc?
    Trying to answer the question "What is the machine doing from the moment I hit [Enter] after entering the password, to the time the Desktop is visible?"

    FYI I've enabled "Verbose vs Normal Status Messages" but there's still a period of time between hitting [Enter] and the first verbose message being displayed on screen.  (What that means is, after I key in my password and login, I see 'Welcome' for several seconds before I see the system performing other steps like User Profile Service, Applying User Settings, Preparing Desktop etc.)

    Friday, June 25, 2010 7:46 PM
  • Fixed thanks guys!

     

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/977346

    Wednesday, July 14, 2010 4:09 PM
  • On Sat, 24 Jul 2010 00:31:44 +0000, Joey456 wrote:

    ·                        Slow problem is a common event for Windows user. Microsoft claimed that:"No matter how fast or shiny computers might be when they're new, they all seem to get slower over time."

    As far as I know, Microsoft has never said that. If you claim that
    they did, please provide a citation of where and when. Point us to a
    web site.

    And that's not my experience at all.


    Ken Blake
    Saturday, July 24, 2010 3:03 AM
  • Hrm, I have run into this problem as well. Its definitely some setting or program that gets installed. I say this because I had a fresh install of Win7 just a few hours ago running on a RAID0 SSD setup, when I typed my password I instantly logged in. I did some overclocking and installing some benchmark applications and now that little circle animates for about 30 seconds.

    Oddly when I try an Guest account (above paragraph applies to Administrator), it instantly logs in again.

    Pretty annoying... I may just format again.

    Saturday, July 24, 2010 10:28 PM
  • On Mon, 26 Jul 2010 02:13:19 +0000, Keron Chew wrote:

    Hello Ken Blake:

    Please see here

    ----> http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Optimize-Windows-Vista-for-better-performance

    Or you can google this " No matter how fast or shiny computers might be when they're new, they all seem to get slower over time"

    Thanks. I'm surprised to see them saying that, but you are obviously
    right. But it's very important to recognize that what they are talking
    about is not Windows itself slowing down, but its user doing things
    poorly: "load it with antispyware and antivirus tools, and download
    untold amounts of junk from the Internet." So the point here is that
    Windows doesn't automatically slow down, it slows down only if you
    make mistakes in using it. So it's not a characteristic of Windows,
    it's a characteristic of many people. It has not at all been my
    experience that it has slowed down like this, because I've been very
    careful not to make such mistakes.

    Even more important, as far as I'm concerned, this article gives very
    poor advice in two respects:

    1. It says "Many PC manufacturers pack their new computers with
    programs you didn▓t order and might not want. These often include
    trial editions and limited edition versions of programs that software
    companies hope you will try, find useful, and then pay to upgrade to
    full versions or newer versions. If you decide you don▓t want them,
    keeping the software on your computer might slow it down by using
    precious memory, disk space, and processing power."

    It's very important to realize that keeping the software on your
    computer does not use "precious memory or processing power." Having
    them installed uses neither of those. Only if you run them do those
    things get used.
    Yes, having a program installed uses disk space, but that has nothing
    to do with performance. And the amount of disk space it uses can range
    from next to nothing to a lot, and the impact of using some disk space
    can range from a severe problem to no impact at all. For example, I
    have well over half a terabyte of free disk space, and using a little
    more of it wouldn't hurt me at all.

    2. It says "Limit how many programs load at startup. Many programs are
    designed to load automatically when Windows starts. Software
    manufacturers often set their programs to open in the background,
    where you can▓t see them running, so they▓ll open right away when you
    click their icons. That's helpful for programs you use a lot, but for
    programs you rarely or never use, this wastes precious memory and
    slows down the time it takes Windows to finish loading."

    I agree with most of what that paragraph says, but I strongly disagree
    with the very first sentence. Their number is irrelevant. What is
    significant is what programs they are. Here's my standard post on
    this subject:

    First, note that you should be concerned with all programs that
    start automatically, not just with those that go into the system tray.
    Not all auto-starting programs manifest themselves by an icon in the
    tray.

    On each program you don't want to start automatically, check its
    Options to see if it has the choice not to start (make sure you
    actually choose the option not to run it, not just a "don't show icon"
    option). Many can easily and best be stopped that way. If that doesn't
    work, run MSCONFIG from the Start | Run line, and on the Startup tab,
    uncheck the programs you don't want to start automatically.

    However, if I were you, I wouldn't do this just for the purpose of
    running the minimum number of programs. Despite what many people tell
    you, you should be concerned, not with how many of these programs
    you run, but which. Some of them can hurt performance severely, but
    others have no effect on performance.

    Don't just stop programs from running willy-nilly. What you should do
    is determine what each program is, what its value is to you, and what
    the cost in performance is of its running all the time. You can try
    internet searches and ask about specifics here.

    Once you have that information, you can make an intelligent informed
    decision about what you want to keep and what you want to get rid of.


    Ken Blake
    Monday, July 26, 2010 5:50 PM
  • Ken,

    I do not agree with your 2 points of poor advice on the article, maybe it was not worded properly or needed a little more explanation but your statements are not entirely correct either.

    1) i understand what you are saying that having a program installed does not affect performance, the problem is that a lot of the software that PC manufacturers pack is not just installed, it is running from day one and even trial versions still load up services or continue to work without updates after trial expiration. I just finished cleaning a ton of stuff from a work pc that came loaded with junk from the manufacturer. It is extremely faster now.

    2) again i understand what you mean that is relevant what the program is, some are worst than others. However the number of programs are relevant, if you have thousands of these (yes that's a stretch) it will add up to significant load time.

    I'm being extreme here because of the way you stated these facts, you are making them absolute and that is not the case. A noob coming across this might get the wrong idea.

    Saturday, July 31, 2010 9:20 PM
  • On Sat, 31 Jul 2010 21:20:23 +0000, sights_and_things wrote:

    Ken,

    I do not agree with your 2 points of poor advice on the article, maybe it was not worded properly or needed a little more explanation but your statements are not entirely correct either.

    Feel free to disagree, but my view is unchanged, and my points are
    completely correct, as far as I'm concerned.

    1) i understand what you are saying that having a program installed does not affect performance, the problem is that a lot of the software that PC manufacturers pack is not just installed, it is running from

    That's true of some software, and such software should be avoided or
    its running stopped. But it remains true that just uninstalling
    software does not improve performance. Running affects (sometimes,
    but not always) performance. That's my view, and I'm sticking to it.

    day one and even trial versions still load up services or continue to work without updates after trial expiration. I just finished cleaning a ton of stuff from a work pc that came loaded with junk from the manufacturer. It is extremely faster now.

    Then you stopped the junk from running. I'm in complete agreement:
    stopping junk from running often improves performance substantially.
    But uninstalling junk that isn't running has no effect on performance.

    2) again i understand what you mean that is relevant what the program is, some are worst than others. However the number of programs are relevant, if you have thousands of these (yes that's a stretch) it will add up to significant load time.

    It's an enormous stretch. Nobody has anywhere near thousands of
    these. What's important is what they are, not their number. Reducing
    their number may improve performance if you stop the right ones from
    running, but may do nothing for performance if you stop the wrong
    ones. Tell people to do something without understanding what's really
    right and what's really wrong, and they will very likely do the wrong
    thing.

    I'm being extreme here because of the way you stated these facts, you are making them absolute and that is not the case. A noob coming across this might get the wrong idea.

    I completely disagree. Tell the noob the wrong things, and don't
    explain the real issues and he will remain a noob, not understanding
    what will help him and what won't. Noobs need to be educated so they
    understand the real issues, not given arbitrary rules (like uninstall
    programs or reduce the number of autostarting programs) that are right
    some of the time and wrong other times.


    Ken Blake
    Sunday, August 01, 2010 12:22 AM
  • The article is more correct than mr Ken here. Of course that keeping unwanted software may cause the computer to slow down . Mr Ken here is getting into the details of how can a particular program be running, whether it starts with the system, or if it runs in background(which was not the point of the article). Guess what mr Ken - it does not matter. What matters is that the software is unwanted, forced upon the usually unsuspecting and unaware and often inexperienced user. Some of it may or may not actually run, taking up resources, thus slowing down the system, at any given time, but the big picture (the point that the writer of the article was trying to make, and apparently everyone but you got it) is that the unwanted softwarte is taking up the resources and slowing the system down, whichever way it is doing it.

    And mr Ken. What can you say to uninstalling junk that is running? Wouldn't that speed up the system? Or maybe you are going to tell me that by uninstalling running process of junk, I'm actually first stopping it and then uninstalling? Please...

    And the statements such as "my view is unchanged, my points are completely correct", where are you from dude? You're not god, you don't make the truth, you don't make the rules and whatever you're saying is not completely correct. Your partially correct answer (also highly debatable as you can see) may be more suitable for users with some computer experience and understanding of how the programs behave and run. Yet the way you put it makes it just very very hard to even read what you're saying...

     

    Nicole

    Monday, August 16, 2010 4:41 AM
  • JuliusPIV

    My troubleshooting is identicle to yours above (except different hardware).  I think we approach things the same way :-)

    Did you get anywhere with this?  From hitting enter after typing userID and p/w my logon times are 30+ seconds and most of that is at the Welcome screen.

    Let me know.

    Cheers

    James.

    Thursday, August 19, 2010 8:14 AM
  • Have you installed the hotfix/update?

    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/
    Thursday, August 19, 2010 2:33 PM
  • Yes (KB980408).  See JuliusPIV's post (who I address my post to above).  I'm at the same point and have done the same steps as he has.

    The hotfixes, the registry change, nor changing the background have worked.  Changing the background does make a difference and often on next logon after a change the logon is really fast (a few seconds), but then the delay returns again.

    Friday, August 20, 2010 3:09 AM
  • enable boot logging in ProcessMonitor and make a boot trace:

    http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?showtopic=140247

    After reboot, stop the logging in ProcessMonitor and save the data as pml. Now zip the pml and large boot trace file (etl) and upload it.


    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/
    Friday, August 20, 2010 1:13 PM
  • I had the exact same problem.  I ran CCLEANER and the problem went away instantly.  Added bonus, my laptop is now much faster as well.
    Thursday, January 20, 2011 11:32 PM
  • Hello!

    I had the same problem on my fresh installation of Ms Windows 7 x64. After a few reboot, I had the "welcome" message hung for 30 secondes. I was very surprised because I have a SSD OCZ Vertex 3 in RAID 0. I have tryed, the regedit manipulation, the GPO, the KB, the change of wallpaper, without success.

     

    After that I have just disconnect my network mapping on my SYNOLOGY NAS (NAS was off) and PROBLEM SOLVED :-)

    • Proposed as answer by HorizonsIT Monday, December 05, 2011 3:51 PM
    Friday, November 25, 2011 10:21 AM
  • Hi there,

     

    The same problem was with my Dell Latitude series. When i log on to the laptop it takes ages to open and show up the desktop i was really fad up with the performance.

    Now, the problem stands resolved when i changed the controls from Action centre and give myself full control, went to msconfig and disable all from startup and cleared the system logs.

     

    The people who have such problem can try this i hope that would work for you as well.

     

    always,

    Rajay 

    Monday, December 05, 2011 1:08 PM
  • That was the issue I see most, happens with my laptop as well.
    Monday, December 05, 2011 3:50 PM
  • Make sure Readyboot is functioning.  c:\windows\prefetch\readyboot\trace1.fx should have a new timestamp about 60 seconds after windows comes online.


    Monday, December 05, 2011 6:22 PM
  • ------ SOLUTION -------

    Problem: computer stalls (almost exactly) 30 seconds after a user logs into his account. The desktop appears only after this time.

    Applicability: Owners of Gigabyte motherboards are more vulnerable to this problem.

     

    Solution #1: change your backround to any jpg picture. Solid color (e.g. all black screen) may cause this problem.

    Solution #2: download and install "Autoruns" program, run autoruns, go to "logon", disable "GBTupd". Other option might be deleting this program from your computer. If you dont have this program installed at your computer there might be another "update utility" that slows down your login process.

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011 5:25 PM
  • 1) Uninstall any optional foreign languages from windows update.

    2) In autoruns, the explorer tab, uncheck all the 'active setup' commands (this is more for new users).  There are 18 of them in 64 bit windows 7.

    Friday, March 23, 2012 2:10 PM
  • Wow!! I have been searching for this a few days now and after i disconected my network drive it got back to normal! Thanks :D
    Sunday, April 01, 2012 6:42 AM
  • Some other thing to consider if you experience slow startup

    Are you running Windows 7 with Service Pack 1, if so perhaps consider checking out some of these slow system startup related posts on my blog site.

    http://aidinit.com/2011/11/windows-7-server-2008-r2-and-sbs-2011-rtm-or-sp1-svchost-exe-may-hold-a-lock-on-a-service-and-delay-windows-startup/
    http://aidinit.com/2011/11/windows-7-rtm-or-sp1-%e2%80%93-slow-system-startup-when-your-machine-contains-a-large-hard-disk-drive/
    http://aidinit.com/2011/11/windows-7windows-server-2008-r2sbs-2011-rtm-or-sp1-slow-system-startup-and-login/
    http://aidinit.com/2011/11/the-startup-process-in-windows-7-sp1-or-windows-server-2008-r2-sp1-may-be-slower-than-expected/
    http://aidinit.com/2011/11/microsoft-windows-based-computers-and-laptops-slow-system-startup-with-realtek-hd-audio-chipset/

    Hopefully you may find that at least one of these is applicable in your situation.

    Also good to note that Group Policy Processing can be directly responsible for slow Login, hotfixes exist for Gpapi.dll (Group Policy Client API), Gpsvc.dll (Group Policy Client) and Gpprefcl.dll (Group Policy Preference Client) to reduce logon performance issues.  If you wish to find the latest version of these three files then please feel free to check out the links to my blog below, I try and update posts as new hotfixes become available so these are all very current and apply to Windows 7 with Service Pack 1.

    http://aidinit.com/2012/04/gpapi-dll-pre-service-pack-2-revision-history-for-windows-server-2008-r2-sp1-and-windows-small-business-server-2011-sbs-2011/
    http://aidinit.com/2012/04/gpsvc-dll-pre-service-pack-2-revision-history-for-windows-server-2008-r2-sp1-windows-7-sp1-and-windows-small-business-server-2011-sbs-2011/
    http://aidinit.com/2012/04/gpprefcl-dll-pre-service-pack-2-revision-history-for-windows-server-2008-r2-sp1-and-windows-small-business-server-2011-sbs-2011/

    Generally speaking if you apply the latest hotfix (Most recent date and highest File Version) then it will include all the previosuly documented fixes.  I would suggest testing these on one machine first and then see how much of an improvement you achieve.

    Hope this helps

    Stuart

    Sunday, April 29, 2012 8:18 AM
  • Fixed! Thanks for all the suggestions. The problem seemed to be that my android phone was plugged into a USB port! Someone on another forum suggested that I look through the device manager for any exclamation marks next to any of my hardware which means there is a driver issue, the phone was the only one, so I unplugged it and restarted my PC and its fine. If  you are still having this issue, look through the device manager for exclamation marks and update/install drivers for it, or disable it and try restarting. Unplug any USB storage devices like USB sticks, phones, etc. Also if you have a disc in your optical drive try removing it, hope it helps.

    Sunday, August 12, 2012 1:21 AM
  • Thanks so much I have been searching and searching for a solution.  I just installed a new SSD and fresh copy of Windows 7, my computer was just hanging for exactly 30 seconds after log on.  I had disabled just about everything in the startup under, MSConfig and was going to apply a hot fix when I read you fix.  I just went into my C: drive under users/program filesx86 and found The Gigabyte folder and deleted GBTupt and @bios from there.  My i -7 is now rocking fast (1.5 seconds from login to desktop).  Thanks again for your help!
    Monday, August 27, 2012 10:50 PM
  • We have had this issue across a number of machines and we found a fix for it, I've put together and guide with all the files you'll need here:

    http://itguru82-sccm.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/welcome-screen-hanging-cannot-run.html


    http://itguru82-sccm.blogspot.co.uk/

    • Proposed as answer by itguru82 Saturday, April 13, 2013 2:13 PM
    Wednesday, November 07, 2012 9:23 PM
  • Hi Guys, I know that this is little bit not too late to response this issue but it seems that I don't see on any forum that can resolve this issue. Here is the solution to increase your windows 7 or windows XP login time, especially if you're working in school environment where sharing computers is happening every day. Stop these two services: Themes and Windows Update.

    I hope this will help you resolve your issue. Cheers.

    Thursday, July 04, 2013 2:24 AM
  • I confirm solution #2. I just fixed 2 computers with Gigabyte motherboards. The registry key is under:

    HKLM\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\RunOnce 

    and the "utility" is:

    C:\Program Files (x86)\Gigabyte\UpdManager\PreRun.exe

    Thursday, September 19, 2013 3:18 AM