none
Drive Letters Changed After Running Sysprep

    Question

  • We are currently in the process of rolling out Vista machines. Using sysprep with an Unattend.xml file we've been progressing alot quicker then we hoped. But now we've hit a snag.

     

    On our Resource Machine (the one we want to image) we have a certain partition set up.

     

    Preload (C: )

    Apps (D: )

    DATA1 (E: )

    DATA2 (F: )

     

    DVD Drive (G: ) - also hidden from user

     

    Once we installed our users programs and tunned the settings to what we wanted. We created our Unattend file and ran sysprep. We then booted the machine up to test it. When we went into Disk Manager we saw this;

     

    Preload (C: )

    Apps (F: )

    DATA1 (D: )

    DATA2 (E: )

     

    DVD Drive (G: )

     

    Is there anyway we can change the Unattend file to stop this? Or is there a setting we missed? I know about diskpart.exe and how it works with the old Unattend.txt, is there something similar with the new Xml file?

    Thursday, October 9, 2008 10:53 PM

Answers

  • I've figured this out on my own. No help from the forum "Guru" who completely read my problem wrong.

     

    For those of you who come across this similar problem there are a couple steps you need to take BEFORE you sysprep your machine.

     

     

    ·                     Before you SYSPREP, open RegEdit and export the Mounted Devices key (HKLMSYSTEMMountedDevices).  !!!Do not close RegEdit. !!!!

    ·                     Open a command prompt and run the sysprep command with all your usual switches (/oobe /generalize /unattend etc etc) BUT insteand of ending it with /shutdown, you MUST end it with /quit

    ·                     Go back to the RegEdit window and import the Mounted Devices key that you exported earlier.

    ·                    Shutdown the PC and then continue on with whateven your game plan is.

    !!Note:  It is important that you leave the RegEdit window open while you run SYSPREP.  If you do not , you will not be able to reopen RegEdit.!!

    Friday, October 10, 2008 10:35 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

     

    It seems you used a third-party tool such as Ghost to capture the image after sysprepping. As I know, Microsoft has not developed a tool which can capture more than one partition a time.

     

    Since Ghost is third-party tool that I am not familiar with, I am not very clear about how it works with unattend.xml.

     

    I think the drive letter issue is not very important. If you really care about it, you can manually change them after the system is installed.

     

    Or you can use the following method to deploy the system:

     

    1.    Sysprep the source system.

    2.    Use ImageX to capture the four partitions one by one.

    3.    Create four partitions with the same drive letters on the destination computer.

    4.    Use ImageX to apply the four partitions one by one.

     

    You may contact Symantec for more information.

     

    Hope it helps.

     

    Tim Quan - MSFT

     

    Friday, October 10, 2008 7:10 AM
    Moderator
  •  

    We actually haven't gotten to the imaging stage yet. We want to work out all the bugs with sysprep first.

     

    What happens is that after we sysprep the machine, we turn it back on right after to test the setup. And as of right now, sysprep is whats changing the drive letters, no third party program.

     

    We need the drive letters to stay as they are first configured because we have programs relying that those specific drives are there and named properly (programs like lotus notes, as400, and IBM iSeries Access). And it would be counter intuitive for us to image hundreds of machines only to go back in to each one and manually change all the drive letters.

     

    So if there is a reason why sysprep is changing them that I can avoid or use a script of some sort to put into the unattend.xml file I would really like to know.

    Friday, October 10, 2008 3:08 PM
  • I've figured this out on my own. No help from the forum "Guru" who completely read my problem wrong.

     

    For those of you who come across this similar problem there are a couple steps you need to take BEFORE you sysprep your machine.

     

     

    ·                     Before you SYSPREP, open RegEdit and export the Mounted Devices key (HKLMSYSTEMMountedDevices).  !!!Do not close RegEdit. !!!!

    ·                     Open a command prompt and run the sysprep command with all your usual switches (/oobe /generalize /unattend etc etc) BUT insteand of ending it with /shutdown, you MUST end it with /quit

    ·                     Go back to the RegEdit window and import the Mounted Devices key that you exported earlier.

    ·                    Shutdown the PC and then continue on with whateven your game plan is.

    !!Note:  It is important that you leave the RegEdit window open while you run SYSPREP.  If you do not , you will not be able to reopen RegEdit.!!

    Friday, October 10, 2008 10:35 PM
  • hi

    i found this post intersting, but in my case there is a different issue and this is related to windows 2003 images that are syspreped while getting deployed in a vmware environment.

    from what i understand if i can capture the registry settings on the actual image and save them somewhere and merge them back once the system is prepped would it achieve the same results.

     

    bhanu

    Saturday, April 3, 2010 9:18 PM
  • I'm found this issue when I run SysPrep on my Windows 7 64bit.

    Before
    System (S:)
    Windows (C:)

    After
    System (F:)
    Windows (D:)

    This causes the generalized image to be unbootable.

    I have a temporary fix in place where before I create the wim, I go into DiskPart and change the drive letters.  But I am curious to know if this post was created in 2008, why I would still have this issue in 2010.


    Jack Sneade
    Kortek Solutions
    http://www.korteksolutions.com
    Saturday, December 18, 2010 1:09 AM