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How do I connect to an active Windows 7 session via RDP as I did with Windows XP RRS feed

  • Question

  • My previous Windows XP desktop was directly accessible via RDP. Now with Windows 7 if I attempt to login to the machine I can disconnect the current session and start a new one but what's really needed is to connect to the active session in the way I could with XP. I've looked at group policies for the machine and domain but have found no solution. Thoughts?
    Thursday, February 2, 2012 2:01 AM

Answers

  • Left machine running logged in to the domain account with applications open.  Tried both /admin and /console but both failed.  I still got the message about disconnecting another user prior to getting the login screen.  I bailed so as to not disconnect the existing session.  I typically don't define login credentials in the RDP client for obvious reasons but I decided to attempt using them.  Using the full domain name, councilforolderadults, I had no luck.  However I had noted that the domain name reference in a number of places was truncated to "councilforolder" and tried coucilforolder\login_name.  That worked.  This was done with /console configured in the RDP shortcut.

    So I thank you for leading me in the right direction.  I'm a happy guy.  :-)

    Gratefully,

    Bob Foulk

     


    RCFoulk
    • Proposed as answer by Niki Han Friday, February 3, 2012 6:37 AM
    • Marked as answer by rcfoulk Friday, February 3, 2012 10:54 PM
    Friday, February 3, 2012 1:18 AM
  • Ah yes.  There are two forms of the domain name that may be used: the FQDN and the pre-Windows 2000 (NT-style) name.  

    The NT-style name is limited to 14 characters.  For example, let's say your domain is mylongdomainname.com, if you didn't specify differently when you created your domain the pre-Windows 2000 form would be "mylongdomainna" - nonsensical, but unless you explicitly specified differently that's the way it works.  

    Thus mylongdomainna\user or mylongdomainname.com\user or user@mylongdomainname.com should all work, but mylongdomainname\user or user@mylongdomainname won't work because the domain name doesn't meet the criteria of a FQDN (it needs the .com) or the shortened NT-style name (it's 2 characters too long).


    • Edited by Bob Reese Friday, February 3, 2012 3:04 AM
    • Marked as answer by rcfoulk Friday, February 3, 2012 12:04 PM
    Friday, February 3, 2012 2:57 AM

All replies

  • Please try "Mstsc.exe /admin " switch and let us know if it helps you.
    -CrDev Blogs: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/satyem
    Thursday, February 2, 2012 2:35 AM
  • Got the same screen indicating that the currently logged on user (me) would be disconnected if I continued.  Regardless, thanks.
    RCFoulk
    Thursday, February 2, 2012 12:02 PM
  • Make sure your RDP session is logging in with the same credentials as the user already logged in, just because they have the same username doesn't mean they're the same user.  

    Let's say machine_A is on a Domain and I'm logged in as a Domain user with the user name BobR, and machine_B, which is not on the Domain (Windows 7 Home Premium for example) is logged on as local user BobR.  If I then try to RDP from machine_B to machine_A it will attempt to log me on as the local user BobR and not the Domain user BobR which will terminate Domain user BobR's session.  I would need to specify my username as bobr@domain in order to connect to the existing session.

    The same would hold true if this is a Workgroup situation where you're only using local users.  You would need to log on to the RDP session using the same local credentials as the user already logged in.  If you're logging onto machine_A from machine_B you'd have to specify the user name as machine_a\user.  

    For Domain credentials you can use either domain_name\user or user@domain_name.  With local credentials you should use only the first method.

    Thursday, February 2, 2012 4:36 PM
  • I'll try the @domain this evening but I did explicitly user domain\user.

     

    Thanks


    RCFoulk
    Thursday, February 2, 2012 6:27 PM
  • In that case, make sure the user already logged in, whose session you're trying to connect to, isn't logged in as a local user.  If so, your logging in as a Domain user will terminate the existing local session.  Also, as stated in a previous post, make sure you use the /admin or /console switch or it will start a new session.  The other user will still be logged in, but the session is dormant.

    The /console switch has be depreciated in favor of /admin, but it still seems to work.  They do the same thing, so using both would be redundant; however, I've found that sometimes /console will work correctly while /admin doesn't.

    Oh cr*p, I forgot to ask this: was the session you're trying to connect to established by a prior RDP session, or was the user (you) physically logged in at the workstation?
    • Edited by Bob Reese Thursday, February 2, 2012 6:55 PM
    Thursday, February 2, 2012 6:53 PM
  • I'm logged in at work to the same domain account that I would like to connect to via RDP.  I haven't tried it but I suspect that if I was logged off it would connect to the account but I prefer to leave my work state as it was when I left work.  So yes, both local and RDP are intended to use the domain user account and no, the existing session was not initiated via RDP.

    Again, thanks for the suggestions.  I'll give them a run later this evening.


    RCFoulk
    Thursday, February 2, 2012 9:52 PM
  • Left machine running logged in to the domain account with applications open.  Tried both /admin and /console but both failed.  I still got the message about disconnecting another user prior to getting the login screen.  I bailed so as to not disconnect the existing session.  I typically don't define login credentials in the RDP client for obvious reasons but I decided to attempt using them.  Using the full domain name, councilforolderadults, I had no luck.  However I had noted that the domain name reference in a number of places was truncated to "councilforolder" and tried coucilforolder\login_name.  That worked.  This was done with /console configured in the RDP shortcut.

    So I thank you for leading me in the right direction.  I'm a happy guy.  :-)

    Gratefully,

    Bob Foulk

     


    RCFoulk
    • Proposed as answer by Niki Han Friday, February 3, 2012 6:37 AM
    • Marked as answer by rcfoulk Friday, February 3, 2012 10:54 PM
    Friday, February 3, 2012 1:18 AM
  • Ah yes.  There are two forms of the domain name that may be used: the FQDN and the pre-Windows 2000 (NT-style) name.  

    The NT-style name is limited to 14 characters.  For example, let's say your domain is mylongdomainname.com, if you didn't specify differently when you created your domain the pre-Windows 2000 form would be "mylongdomainna" - nonsensical, but unless you explicitly specified differently that's the way it works.  

    Thus mylongdomainna\user or mylongdomainname.com\user or user@mylongdomainname.com should all work, but mylongdomainname\user or user@mylongdomainname won't work because the domain name doesn't meet the criteria of a FQDN (it needs the .com) or the shortened NT-style name (it's 2 characters too long).


    • Edited by Bob Reese Friday, February 3, 2012 3:04 AM
    • Marked as answer by rcfoulk Friday, February 3, 2012 12:04 PM
    Friday, February 3, 2012 2:57 AM