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win 7 uninstall ie9 go back to ie8

    Question

  • My bank online system is not compatible with ie9. I downloaded it and then found out I can't access bank info. Need to reinsatll ie8
    Friday, April 01, 2011 9:45 PM

Answers

  • First, have you tried compatibility mode on the site?

    Also you can try going to the site and  pressing F12 and change the Browser mode to IE8.

    But if you want to go back to IE8:

    To uninstall IE9, go to the Control Panel.

    Then select Programs and Features.

    Then View installed updates on the left.

    Go down the List and select Internet Explorer 9

    Then click on Uninstall.

    Friday, April 01, 2011 10:56 PM

All replies

  • How do I get back to what worked?
    Friday, April 01, 2011 9:47 PM
  • First, have you tried compatibility mode on the site?

    Also you can try going to the site and  pressing F12 and change the Browser mode to IE8.

    But if you want to go back to IE8:

    To uninstall IE9, go to the Control Panel.

    Then select Programs and Features.

    Then View installed updates on the left.

    Go down the List and select Internet Explorer 9

    Then click on Uninstall.

    Friday, April 01, 2011 10:56 PM
  • On Fri, 1 Apr 2011 21:45:26 +0000, mfnichols wrote:

    My bank online system is not compatible with ie9. I downloaded it and then found out I can't access bank info. Need to reinsatll ie8

    See Lead3's reply as an answer to your question, but I recommend that
    you do not uninstall IE9.

    Instead I recommend that you keep IE9 and use it for all other web
    sites. For the bank's web site, use a different browser that your bank
    supports--Firefox, or whatever browser you like.


    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP
    Friday, April 01, 2011 11:37 PM
  • See http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/how-do-i-install-or-uninstall-internet-explorer-9 for more information on uninstalling IE9.

    Hope this helps.

    Sunday, April 03, 2011 6:38 AM
  • Thanks

    F12 did the trick for me, really frustrated becuase KY.gov secure websites says multiple sessions not allowed (due to I,E, 9)

    Plus Task Mgr shows 2 sessions of iexplore *32. Why is this ? Is this necesaary? How do we modify or configure this I.E. properly to only allow 1 sessions.

    http://oet.ky.gov/

    Thanks

    Carl

     

     

    Monday, April 11, 2011 4:37 PM
  • this will just uninstall 9,and 8 will still be there?

    i wont have to try and re-install it?

    im new to 7,so im apprehensive


    Monday, May 23, 2011 11:04 AM
  • We have the same difficulties with IE9, and are taking them off all our systems.  Every PC and every instance of IE9 has the same issues. Was so hopeful in this browser version.  We're also recommending to all our clients to avoid it until it is stable.  We're not anti-IE, but see no reason to use it until it can display sites correctly. 
    Sunday, August 07, 2011 3:04 AM
  • Perhaps you should be looking to the sites to display themselves correctly.

    And as has been mentioned above, have you experimented with the various Compatibility settings?  They're quite numerous.

    -Noel

    Sunday, August 07, 2011 8:01 PM
  • Perhaps MS should stop attempting to shove IE9 down everyone's throats first.  I uninstalled IE9 for similar reasons, and IE8 is not there waiting for you.  I had IE 8 before and now it is completely missing after installing IE9 which is patently unstable.  I am a system administrator for a local municipality and I'm telling you that IE9 is the Vista of Internet browsers: Completely worthless.

     

    Microsoft will not even allow you to download any version of IE8 for Win 7.  It doesn't exist any more and all you get is IE 8 not supported for Windows 7.  It smells a lot like the huge push to shove their best Operating system ever, XP overboard in an attempt to sell you another operating system that isn't as simple for the users and doesn't work as well for businesses either.

    I've supported Microsoft environments for more than 15 years and IE9 is just a plain waste of time.  Thanks, Microsoft, for once again taking something that works and replacing it with something that sucks.

    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 2:25 PM
  • IE9 ... is patently unstable. I am a system administrator for a local municipality and I'm telling you that IE9 is the Vista of Internet browsers: Completely worthless.

    Slagtron, that's not been my experience at all.

    Perhaps you might want to try and debug your specific problems, rather than trying to move backwards.  IE9 works quite well indeed for me (on my small office network with a number of different Vista and Windows 7 systems).  But of course not everyone visits the same sites or installs the same Add-ons.

    And considering that IE9 uses your system/GPU in ways IE8 did not (e.g., for accelerated rendering), it's not surprising that it might seem faulty on some systems.  Have you tried changing the setting that governs whether it uses the GPU?  Have you looked to see if there are updated display drivers for your hardware/OS version?

    What's it doing wrong for you?  Can you suggest a way to reproduce the problems you're seeing, so others can try the same things?

    -Noel


    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 3:58 PM
  • Should I expect something to go wrong when I click that picture?  It just opens a bigger one for me in IE9...

     

     

    It's very considerate of you to be concerned over my eyesight, Derosnec, thank you, but it's pretty clear I can read what others have written here.  I'm posting the larger font just as a courtesy to others, because the font choice made here by the forum designers is simply too small and thin.  But thank you for your concern.

     

    -Noel

    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 6:11 PM
  • You are no doubt thinking the larger image should open in an animated way.

    Note that the <a> element is coded with an undocumented rel="lightbox[gallery]" extension.  Did you happen to notice that the lightbox.js script the page makes use of (and which hacks into the document object model) was developed in 2008, pre-dating the release of IE9?

    Did you happen to notice that if you click the Compatibility View icon that IE will show you the animation?

    It seems to me the lack of animation is the fault of the content of this particular web page for not coding its animations in a way that's compatible with the latest documented standards employed by one of the most popular browsers.  We see that it does have some browser-specific code in it.

    Further, a little research turns up the fact that there's been a new release of Lightbox that claims to be IE9 compatible.

    The choice of whether to code a browser to be more compatible with everything out there that's taken advantage of past browser quirks vs. to be more secure is of course open for debate.  Perhaps you prefer a more promiscuous browser that shows you more glitz.  Personally, I have no problem with seeing a larger image as a flat JPEG display on a separate window, if it means scripts have more trouble hacking into the DOM and doing nefarious things.

    I'm the first to admit that Microsoft didn't get everything right in IE9...  Note the extra search box in my screen grabs above, for example.  But in the context of this thread, with the example shown, I fail to see how a reluctance to press the "Compatibility View" icon (because of inattentiveness by the site maintainer) could justify throwing out IE9 and reverting to IE8.  That's just silly.

    -Noel


    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 6:43 PM
  • Awwww...  Giving up?  I guess I win this round of "who's the better geek", then.  :)  Thanks for playing.

    And, as a concession to your sensitive perceptions, I'm not using the larger font in this post.

    I was looking over the change the Lightbox maintainers made to make the script IE9-compatible.  It turns out the change involves a more technically correct use of Javascript to access the DOM, avoiding a shortcut that would have made the Javascript more difficult to compile, and lo and behold it now works for all browsers.  Imagine that!  Speed AND compatibility!

    -Noel

    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 7:11 PM
  • By the way, I'm curious... 

    Do you maintain any web sites? 

    If so, did you not check them to see if everything worked when IE9 was first released?

    -Noel

    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 7:22 PM
  • Nope, first I've seen of that post.  I hope it doesn't come as a disappointment to hear that I don't make a habit of following you like a puppy.

    But knowing that you already figured out that the problem was with Lightbox 2.04, it makes your example of a broken web page in IE9 seem a bit of a strange one to pick...  I take it you'd like to discuss whether IE9 should be more compatible vs. more secure, even though just above you tried to dismiss the subject.

    Would you prefer IE bend over backwards to be compatible with every web page and script ever published, then?  If so, how should Microsoft move it past the mistakes of the past (many of which lead to security problems)?

    Balancing progress against backwards compatibility is an age-old software problem, not invented by Microsoft.

    -Noel

    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 7:37 PM
  • That's a better example.  I can confirm it does nothing but refresh here too, with or without the Compatibility View setting.

    On a closer look, though, it's just a page fragment, apparently crafted to work as part of the larger .aspx page, so it's kind of difficult to define what "goofs up" really means.  It doesn't appear it was designed to stand alone.  On the other hand, the other browsers successfully redirect to the .aspx page and stop refreshing.

    Have you analyzed why IE fails to redirect to the .aspx page?

    For what it's worth, IE10 and IE8 fail on this page fragment in the same way.

    -Noel

    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 11:58 PM
  • Not a really too big a surprise.  Microsoft haven't really shown themselves to be the world's greatest web designers.  The style setup here on this site is an example - e.g., a too-small font, defined as a percentage of something that can't quite be nailed down...

    But once again, in this example the problem could arguably be said to be with the web page design, not with the browser. 

    It's not really clear where a browser's "flexibility" should stop and requirement of proper web page coding should start.  One could imagine at one extreme a [future] browser being as smart as a human - or beyond - and trying its level best to interpret what the web designers meant (not what they literally coded) when they threw together their web pages.  It would probably commit browsercide in milliseconds.

    Back a few decades we used to wonder whether we'd ever have software that would "do what I mean, not what I say".  The more I have thought about this over the years, the more I have become convinced that we should be careful what we wish for...

    -Noel

    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 1:40 PM
  • By the way, a really good example of browser implementation insufficiency could be found right here on this forum site - pull up a thread with hundreds of responses in flat view with the 64 bit IE9 (possibly 32 bit as well)...  Sometimes it will display, sometimes there will be a significant delay, and once in a while it will crash.  There appears to be some limit that's being reached or exceeded. 

    You might say that a browser should reasonably be able to expect a page size not to get that large, but hey, when you allow the public to design your web page (indirectly, through accumulation of forum posts) the sky's the limit - especially when they're discussing an actual Microsoft bug in another product with "Explorer" in the name!

    This tells me that Microsoft clearly is not doing a sufficient amount of testing of their own browser on their own website (both when working on the browser and when designing their own website).

    Not having used Firefox or other browsers much, personally - save for spot testing - I'm not sure whether other sites can be found that will blow them out of the water - I suspect there must be some.

    I am still curious, beyond the obvious examples we've listed here, what instability is driving the people up above in this thread to want to uninstall IE9 entirely.  My own personal suspicion is that there are many ill-behaved Add-ons out there causing this impression.  One of the things that I have done is change IE's configuration so that Add-ons won't be installed except from Trusted Sites and only then when I approve them, so I run with a VERY small set.  This seems to be a good strategy.

    -Noel

    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 2:04 PM
  • Noel how do you fix and error that your browser is not supported by web dyn pro?  I have tried compatibility modes for IE 7, 8, and 9.  It still shows that error.  But, if a user has IE 8 it works perfectly.  Have tried using Opera, Safari, Firefox, and Chrome and receive the same errors.  I have not been able to look at my paycheck for 3 months since I got this crappy browser.  What is your proposed fix there?
    Monday, November 07, 2011 4:09 AM
  • I take it your paycheck views are through an intranet site...  If it's a publicly-reachable online site, please share the URL.

    Have you contacted the people who run the site to ask why it's not compatible with one of the most common internet browsers?

    If you haven't been able to get it to work with any of the compatibility modes, AND the other browsers don't work with it, it's likely a problem with the site not conforming to standards, not a browser problem per-se.  Plus some sites actually detect what browser you're using, and put up a message (e.g., "not supported").  Again, that indicates a problem with the site software, not the specific browser. 

    Trying to uninstall a browser so as to be compatible with one specific site that's malfunctioning seems a bit extreme.

    -Noel

    Monday, November 07, 2011 1:42 PM
  • Why do you recommend not uninstalling IE9
    Friday, November 18, 2011 12:00 AM
  • If you're asking me, it's pretty obvious:  You can't live in the past forever.

    Sure, you could run IE8 for a while.  But then what?  You don't get the benefit of new development.  When web sites start to deliver content only IE9 can digest what do you do?

    What's happening to the people trying to continue running Windows XP?  Do they have a long and happy future with XP?

    I've been using IE9 since the day it was released.  There's nothing I can't see or do with it that I really want to.  Frankly it's delivering the best browsing experience I have had from any of the IE releases, and I use IE because I feel it does a better job than any of its competitors.  Now, I certainly don't use it for exactly the same things as you or anyone else does, so your mileage may vary.

    -Noel

    Friday, November 18, 2011 2:37 AM
  • Give me a break. We use Microsoft Dynamics and its browser tools will not work with IE9. Why would I use some other browser, as you say Firefox or whatever browser you like, instead of IE8 which works great on all the sites we need to access at work.


    Price Brattin, SQLServer & SharePoint 2010 MCP, Microsoft Dynamics SL Consultant

    Friday, February 24, 2012 2:24 AM
  • I am so irritated that automatic Microsoft Update installed IE9! Lead3's reply does not tell us how we can get IE8 back after uninstalling IE9. How does one download IE8 if there is no browser on the computer?

    Price Brattin, SQLServer & SharePoint 2010 MCP, Microsoft Dynamics SL Consultant

    Friday, February 24, 2012 2:32 AM
  • I dunno, Noel. You say, " it's pretty obvious:  You can't live in the past forever." If the current version of some of Microsoft's products (for example Microsoft Dynamics Business Portal (BP)) will not run on IE9, then it's not obvious to a lot of us. If we need something like BP to do our jobs in the workplace, then I don't see the advantage of upgrading to IE9.


    Price Brattin, SQLServer & SharePoint 2010 MCP, Microsoft Dynamics SL Consultant

    Friday, February 24, 2012 2:45 AM
  • If you uninstall IE 9 as I indicated you should have IE 8 back automatically.
    Friday, February 24, 2012 3:29 AM
  • I dunno, Noel. You say, " it's pretty obvious:  You can't live in the past forever." If the current version of some of Microsoft's products (for example Microsoft Dynamics Business Portal (BP)) will not run on IE9, then it's not obvious to a lot of us. If we need something like BP to do our jobs in the workplace, then I don't see the advantage of upgrading to IE9.

    You want to get specific, but generally speaking it seems pretty obvious to me.  Take it to extremes in your thinking...

    Some day, in the far future, you're not even going to be able to run IE8 at all.  It just won't be possible.  You might find yourself trying to keep ancient computer systems around (and running), or using compatibility settings, or maintaining ancient virtual machines running ancient operating systems, but...  You'll want to run new stuff on new hardware too.  What then?  New hardware might not even be similar to what you use now (e.g., a tablet vs. a computer, that sort of thing).

    Looked at another way, what if you had something that only worked with Internet Explorer version 3 right now?  What would you do?

    If your business is based on things that don't keep pace with current development, which has to change?

    Sure, there are ways to avoid upgrading in the short term does give you (or the developers of incompatible apps) time to migrate things that don't work.  But make no mistake - the world is moving on.  If you don't one day you'll find there simply won't be a way to "get there from here".

    Make no mistake:  It's all about separating your money from your wallet.

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my new eBook: Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options

    Friday, February 24, 2012 5:51 PM
  • You make some good points, Neal. Give me some advice. We are a 500 person company that is a near 100% MS IT shop, with Sharepoint 2010, SQLServer 2008 R2, Exchange 2010, etc. We use Microsoft Dynamics as our ERP system and that software runs the operations of the company. MS Dynamics is used by hundreds of thousands of sites. MS Dynamics will not run with IE9 but it runs great with IE8. What do you suggest we do in regard to upgrading to IE9?

    Price Brattin, SQLServer & SharePoint 2010 MCP, Microsoft Dynamics SL Consultant

    Friday, February 24, 2012 7:19 PM
  • Well, first, let me say I was unfamiliar with MS Dynamics, so I went over to look at their info on it...

    The first thing I see is that they're currently selling it - i.e., it's a current product.  And their own demo videos show it working with IE9.

    Are you saying they are selling a current product, showing it working with their own current web browser, but that it doesn't really work?  What do their support people say about this?

    Perhaps you should describe the problem...

    How, specifically, does your setup fail?

    Will it work with IE9 if you choose its IE8 browser mode?

    Is it a matter of your company not wanting to upgrade to the latest version or something?

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my new eBook: Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options

    Friday, February 24, 2012 7:54 PM
  • >Are you saying they are selling a current product, showing it working with their own current web browser, but that it doesn't really work?

    I don't know about what the website shows but I can tell you for sure that parts of MS Dynamics will only work on IE8 or less.

    What do their support people say about this?

    Microsoft Tech Support says the product will not work on IE9. Don't use it until the problems are fixed. They do not publish a target date for it to run on IE9.

    Perhaps you should describe the problem...

    When using IE9, the screens show the infamous "script error. Continue running scripts in this screen?"

    How, specifically, does your setup fail?

    There are no setup problems.

    Will it work with IE9 if you choose its IE8 browser mode?

    AFAIK, no. That technique has been tried hundreds of times.

    Is it a matter of your company not wanting to upgrade to the latest version or something?

    The users in the company do not know about upgrading the browser. They could not care less about what version the browser is. They just want to the programs that run in the browser to work. IT uses the latest versions of SQL, Windows, Exchange, etc.


    Price Brattin, SQLServer & SharePoint 2010 MCP, Microsoft Dynamics SL Consultant

    Friday, February 24, 2012 8:42 PM
  • Wow.  It seems to me that Microsoft is overtly advertising support for IE9 right in their own sales materials.  Assuming these script problems you describe really are in their scripts, and their own browser fails to properly run the product, then you really have to escalate the problems with them.  I take it this is what you have done, and their answer is "hold off upgrading; we're working on it".  I think I understand your predicament now. 

    How long can Microsoft expect that kind of put-off to keep?  IE9 has been out now for quite a long time!  Certainly their own business development people have been able to work with it for longer than we've seen it in the field.

    Out of curiosity, does the 64 bit IE9 have the same problems as the 32 bit IE9?  I ask because my understanding is that the script engine implementation between the two differs considerably.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my new eBook: Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options

    Saturday, February 25, 2012 6:05 PM
  • >does the 64 bit IE9 have the same problems as the 32 bit IE9? 

    I think so, the 64Bit IE9 was automatically installed on my laptop by the automatic update and I could not get the Business Portal to run using it. I uninstalled IE9 using the procedure above and the IE8 works fine.

    I think that a fix was released on the latest version of Business Portal that allows it to run on IE9. The problem is that the latest version of BP requires an upgrade to the latest version of MS Dynamics and not many sites are upgrading to a newly released version, intending to wait until it's been out for at least a year.

    The problem with IE9 pales to the problem with Win7 SP1. To give you an idea of how one division of MS does not keep up with other divisions, consider the problem with ADO that was introduced by Win7 SP1. <http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/windowsgeneraldevelopmentissues/thread/3a4ce946-effa-4f77-98a6-34f11c6b5a13?prof=required>

    A TypeLib was introduced with SP1 that broke the process of creating programs on a Win7 SP1 machine and running them on other versions of Windows. It was a year later <http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/windowsgeneraldevelopmentissues/thread/280de88a-77dd-455e-9797-b28928206e38/> that the issue was finally fixed (we think). A lot of angst and wasted activity was created by this glitch.


    Price Brattin, SQLServer & SharePoint 2010 MCP, Microsoft Dynamics SL Consultant

    Monday, February 27, 2012 3:22 PM
  • I think that a fix was released on the latest version of Business Portal that allows it to run on IE9. The problem is that the latest version of BP requires an upgrade to the latest version of MS Dynamics and not many sites are upgrading to a newly released version

    Ah.

    Perhaps Microsoft expects your IT department to take control of metering out all software updates, so that if your company chooses to be conservative (arguably a wise strategy in some cases) that IT will gate the installation of all newer software releases (MS Dynamics, Business Portal, and IE alike) until they feel they're all stable.  Of course, when you get new machines with the newer software already installed, these pose a special problem.

    I think many IT organizations don't understand there's value in actually keeping up with current updates - an OVERconservative strategy, such as trying to run very old versions of things for far too long, has its own problems and they can be significant.  A tightrope must be walked.

    It's not surprising that overconservatism exists - IT departments are traditionally underfunded, people are always pressed for time, an update can come out at a particularly inconvenient time, and managers aren't willing to trust important business operations to brand new releases...  But the problem is that software updates are a fact of life, they can be very helpful, and they really DO need to be dealt with.  Often there are ways to evaluate products early, to keep ahead of the game. 

    I run my own small business, and for example we already know what things we're going to have to worry about with Windows 8, because we took the time to set it up and get familiar with it as soon as the Developer Preview was available.  We're planning to spend more time with the Customer Preview version when it comes out very soon.  What I've learned is that Microsoft can be a powerful ally, and keeping pace with them does have some business advantages.

    Best of luck getting everything working properly.

      

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my new eBook: Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options

    • Edited by Noel Carboni Monday, February 27, 2012 6:59 PM removed redundant "for example"
    Monday, February 27, 2012 4:22 PM
  • I took the steps mensioned to uninstall IE9,( to re-newing the install to avoid the proplem non browsing ) , but unfortionatly didnot find ie9 to select. 
    Thursday, April 26, 2012 8:23 PM
  • OK, nearly a year later and IE9 is still bottom of the barrel.  Compatibility issues still abound and hey!  Since IE9 came out, Chrome has taken the Market share crown for the first time ever.  IE8 patently outperforms it on every sight except those specifically coded for IE9.  I have banned IE9 from our network and the IE related trouble calls have dropped dramatically, so no matter what your opinion of it, you can't argue with "removing it cuts trouble calls"

    Oh, and on certain releases, you cannot revert to IE8 nor is the download available online...

    • Edited by Slagtron Friday, June 08, 2012 7:04 PM
    Friday, June 08, 2012 7:02 PM
  • I have to run 3 browsers to get quite a few sites to work - start with IE9 (N/G) - then either Chrome or FFox, these will work.

    IE9 pure garbage!!

    Friday, June 22, 2012 4:27 PM
  • Eric, you're clearly frustrated.  You should take the day off before you hurt someone.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Saturday, July 28, 2012 4:53 PM
  • Eric, I understand totally. I'm a Senior trying to learn how to just use computers. I found mine by ACCIDENT in My Downloaded Games Files of all places . Go figure

    Anna Shafsky


    • Edited by GraniLyn Saturday, November 03, 2012 6:15 PM
    Saturday, November 03, 2012 6:15 PM
  • So... Anna, thanks for confirming: IE9 is a "GAME!" Well, now we know why all the bugs... LOL

    tnjman

    Saturday, November 17, 2012 6:53 AM
  • lol now I know how Noel racks up his forum points...

    Not all questions are answered by "Praise Microsoft." IE8 is/was good, but FFox is better.  IE9 attempted to force web designers to flock to Microsoft's HTML5, which was at the time of release, buggy in the extreme.  IE 10 looks to be even worse and it too breaks everything we have.  But why is anyone surprised? Microsoft did an exceptionally good job with XP, and suffered for it by not being able to sell Millennium 2/Vista (yes, that's a joke). In short, IE9 will be obsolete before it even becomes stable enough for everyone to use, so most will simply leapfrog to the next version if IE 10 becomes useable soon, or we'll just continue to use Firefox...

    Thursday, April 04, 2013 9:14 PM
  • HTML5 is an open-source standard - and very little to do with MS.

    Check your 'facts'


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    No - I do not work for Microsoft, or any of its contractors.

    Thursday, April 04, 2013 9:47 PM
  • lol now I know how Noel racks up his forum points...

    Yes, of course, it's not about being helpful, you've caught me; discovered my secret (assuming you weren't talking to the other Noel).  It's all about shilling Microsoft wares whenever possible.  I've got nothing but positive things to say about Windows 8, IE10, etc. in all my posts (go see!) so I can get those all-important points, with which I can buy great stuff like the ability to participate in this forum for free!  Just look at all the "helpful" votes I've gotten in this thread alone!  This is the way to go!

    Just a little hint, Slagtron:  Coming onto a forum and bellowing about how this and that doesn't work really just lets others with skills know that you haven't got a clue how things work, or how to make things work.

    Not a person on this planet gives a damn what browser you think is better, or choose to use.

      

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Friday, April 05, 2013 11:39 PM
  • From one Noel to another - you simply talk too much sense to be an MS shill  :)

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    No - I do not work for Microsoft, or any of its contractors.

    Saturday, April 06, 2013 10:06 AM