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Memory (RAM): RRS feed

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  • Hi again.

     

    If it says 8.00 GB, what does that mean?

     

    This means that there is 8 GigaBytes of RAM installed on the computer.

     

    Hope this helps.


    If this post helps to resolve your issue, click the Mark as Answer button at the top of this message.


    Ronnie Vernon
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Desktop Experience

    Friday, November 7, 2008 4:54 AM
    Moderator
  • Obviously yes but what does this mean for memory usage etc.


    I note using a program such as analogX maxmem doesn't show it as a contigious entity and I think this is due to the fact that the system is 32 bit, so if you can could you please enlighten me on this issue.

    Thanks
    Friday, November 7, 2008 5:29 AM
  • Are you sure that you actually have 8GB RAM installed?  There's zero point to installing that much on a 32-bit system, as it's impossible to address even 4GB RAM.  It would need to be a 64-bit OS to use it.

    Info requested - it would be helpful to see your system (OS and hardware) info.
    Open a command prompt (type cmd into the Start menu's search box, hit <enter>
    Type systeminfo <enter>
    Right-click anywhere in the window (once it's done loading the information) > select all > hit <enter>
    Contents are now copied to your clipboard.  Paste the output into your reply.  Thanks!  Smile

     

    Friday, November 7, 2008 5:42 PM
  • Hi

     

     

    A 32bit Windows system can recognize 4GB of address space. The address space above 3GB is used for the hardware devices on the system. Depending on the installed hardware, a 32bit Windows system can only use slightly more than 3GB RAM maximum. You would need to install a 64bit version of Windows to take advantage of more RAM.

     

    In Vista 32bit, prior to Service Pack 1, the amount of RAM that was available was reported. This caused a lot of consternation for users who had 4GB or more of RAM installed when the system reported that only between 2.5 and 3.2 of their 4GB of RAM was available for use.

     

    Microsoft changed this with SP1. The full amount of RAM is now reported, but this does not change the fact that only 2.5 and 3.2 are available for use.

     

    The system memory that is reported in the System Information dialog box in Windows Vista is less than you expect if 4 GB of RAM is installed:
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929605

    Windows Vista SP1 includes reporting of Installed System Memory (RAM):
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/946003

     

    Hope this helps.

     


    If this post helps to resolve your issue, click the Mark as Answer button at the top of this message.


    Ronnie Vernon
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Desktop Experience

    Friday, November 7, 2008 6:06 PM
    Moderator
  • So does that mean that even windows server 2008 (32bit) may report all the RAM on a given system but it cannot use it for applications, nor the OS itself, is this correct?
    Friday, November 7, 2008 11:25 PM
  • Hi

     

    Please see the following website for the information on memory limits in all versions of Windows and Server editions.

     

    Memory Limits for Windows Releases:
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa366778.aspx

     

    Hope this helps.


    If this post helps to resolve your issue, click the Mark as Answer button at the top of this message.

    Ronnie Vernon
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Desktop Experience
    Friday, November 7, 2008 11:45 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks again for the reply.

    The following link:

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=13C7300E-935C-415A-A79C-538E933D5424&displaylang=en

    would appear not to be SP1. Is there an SP1 for Windows Server Enterprise 2008

    P.S I don't like the naming of windows server 2008 enterprise, I prefer it how I said it Smile
    Saturday, November 8, 2008 12:44 AM
  • Also, why the "***" doesn't the Windows Server Standard Edition allow RAM up to 8GB. Seems like a mistake and makes it look like a toy server.
    Saturday, November 8, 2008 12:47 AM
  • Since windows enterprise server 2008 addresses more than 8GB and it's 32 bit, why not have Vista and enterprise standard address more memory.

    It's an opportunity lost if it doesn't happen by the next service pack since what is windows 7 anyway, all 64 bit would that be correct, so how do the great powers at MS expect to phase out old garbage like XP if these fake limitations exist in their flagship software.


    On a point of order, it says 4GB or whatever is available to the OS, so does this mean that a portion of that is only availble to programs and if so wouldn't that constitute a real limitation notwitstanding greater graphics memory for example?


    Thanks again.

    Saturday, November 15, 2008 2:00 AM