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Upgrade Windows 7 RC to Windows 7 final

    Question

  • Do anybody know if microsoft will make it possible to upgrade the RC version of Windows 7 to the final version end this year?
    Thx,

    Berimbau
    Monday, May 4, 2009 10:22 AM

Answers

  • Hi,
    I had a mail from Microsoft stating this:

    Please note: All users of the Windows 7 Release Candidate (including Windows Vista users who have upgraded to the Release Candidate) must do a clean installation of Windows 7 RTM. Please keep this is mind as you consider downloading the Release Candidate as opposed to waiting for the general availability release.

    Thanks again for your help in reaching this important milestone. We hope that you will join us in testing the RC and finishing Windows 7!

    Hope this answers your question.

    Regards

    Rem
    Monday, May 4, 2009 1:07 PM

All replies

  • berimbau -

    I don't believe I've heard anything specific on that as yet. But I'm not entirely sure you can successfully do it unless you're installing 7 Ultimate or Enterprise (which is pretty much the same thing).

    Let's say, you've got the Ultimate RC, you've joined a domain. Now you went and bought a copy of Home Premium.. Whoops. Home Premium doesn't do domains. Not sure how well that would work. It could be more trouble than it's worth. I'm thinking it would be probably best to just backup, nuke and pave and make sure you've got the full RTM on your hard drive without all the leftovers from the RC.

    But hey, I could be wrong.
    Monday, May 4, 2009 11:18 AM
  • Hi,
    I had a mail from Microsoft stating this:

    Please note: All users of the Windows 7 Release Candidate (including Windows Vista users who have upgraded to the Release Candidate) must do a clean installation of Windows 7 RTM. Please keep this is mind as you consider downloading the Release Candidate as opposed to waiting for the general availability release.

    Thanks again for your help in reaching this important milestone. We hope that you will join us in testing the RC and finishing Windows 7!

    Hope this answers your question.

    Regards

    Rem
    Monday, May 4, 2009 1:07 PM
  • The current situation, Berimbau is that you will need to do a 'clean' install.
    John Barnett MVP: Windows XP Associate Expert: Windows Desktop Experience: Web: http://www.winuser.co.uk; Web: http://xphelpandsupport.mvps.org; Web: http://vistasupport.mvps.org;
    Monday, May 4, 2009 2:52 PM
    Answerer
  • It would be cool if you could just buy a license/key when it went RTM and Windows Update would just update you to RTM with a full ISO download availible at any time for permenant backup, lol. Installing the OS itself is fairly quick and easy, but it's the installing apps, settings, and tweaking it back up to where it was before that takes all the time, lol. But yea, for a permanant install like the RTM, better to be safe and just go fully clean on a freshly formatted disk...
    Monday, May 4, 2009 3:54 PM
  • emig5n that would be cool, i use a multi boot setup and removing the older version will cause me a headache, + all the reinstalling of apps ect ect
    Monday, May 4, 2009 9:27 PM
  • the question is will windows 7 final be a reasonable price or will it be the usual 200 bucks or more?  I mean what happened to the days or reasonable prices on microsoft products they seem to have skyrocketed since the release of windows xp and windows millenium.  I know part of it is upgraded technology but still that shouldn't raise the price on a computer operating system through the roof.  at any rate forgive my rant.
    Sunday, May 10, 2009 11:15 AM
  • the question is will windows 7 final be a reasonable price or will it be the usual 200 bucks or more?  I mean what happened to the days or reasonable prices on microsoft products they seem to have skyrocketed since the release of windows xp and windows millenium.  I know part of it is upgraded technology but still that shouldn't raise the price on a computer operating system through the roof.  at any rate forgive my rant.

    I admit I like (really) this RC. I wouldn't like to go back to XP if I don't have to.
    The interesting thing to know is whether the benefits of having Windows 7 our not outweighted by the pricing of it.
    I think I'll buy the OS when it comes out, but not at any price.

    btw Yours was not a rant, just an observation as far as I'm concerned.

    Regards

    Rem
    Sunday, May 10, 2009 12:46 PM
  • I know one thing As a user of Vista Ultimate I expect to pay NO MORE then $90-100 for an upgrade to SEVEN ULTIMATE!

    Perhaps let us upgrade to 7 Home Premium (I'm going to do 64 bit on 7 while Vista is still 32) and give us a free Anytime upgrade to ultimate as thanks for investing the $200+ for Ultimate as opposed to Home Premium


    Wednesday, May 20, 2009 3:37 PM
  • Do anybody know if microsoft will make it possible to upgrade the RC version of Windows 7 to the final version end this year?
    Thx,

    Berimbau

    If you look at the installation instructions from Microsoft below you'll see that before it was available for download we were told the answer was no!
    As to whether or not that clever programers can make an upgrade work is quite another question.

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-7/installation-instructions.aspx


    IMPORTANT:
      The RC will expire on June 1, 2010. Starting on March 1, 2010, your PC will begin shutting down every two hours. Windows will notify you two weeks before the bi-hourly shutdowns start. To avoid interruption, you'll need to rebuild your test machine using a valid version of Windows before the software expires. You'll need to rebuild your test PC to replace the OS and reinstall all your programs and data. 
    [My embolding and underlining.] 


    Old Mig15 pilot.
    Wednesday, May 20, 2009 6:39 PM
  • Upgrade for RC to Final and you run the risk of bringing
    some of the bugs in the RC across to the Released version.

    Start with a clean install of the Released version.
    JS
    Wednesday, May 20, 2009 7:14 PM
  • According to a newsmail from Microsoft I got today:

    "There’s another expiration date you need to keep in mind
    : Windows 7 RC will expire on June 1, 2010, and you’ll need to either upgrade to the final release of Windows 7 or a prior version of Windows before then. (We‘ll send you another reminder as this date approaches.)"

    Do they mean upgrade as in a clean installation, or an actual upgrade through an upgrade?
    Monday, May 25, 2009 8:05 AM
  • According to a newsmail from Microsoft I got today:

    "There’s another expiration date you need to keep in mind
    : Windows 7 RC will expire on June 1, 2010, and you’ll need to either upgrade to the final release of Windows 7 or a prior version of Windows before then. (We‘ll send you another reminder as this date approaches.)"

    Do they mean upgrade as in a clean installation, or an actual upgrade through an upgrade?

    What they mean - per the previously released information - would be to Backup, Nuke, Pave and Restore (a clean install)... They don't want beta or RC bits floating about in the final product. As they said before, upgrades can cause issues that don't happen in a clean installation and since they don't usually bother tracking those down, they only recommend an upgrade from Vista OR a clean installation.
    Monday, May 25, 2009 9:27 AM
  • This is the best I have heard yet as far as ideas about this are concerned:

    It would be cool if you could just buy a license/key when it went RTM and Windows Update would just update you to RTM with a full ISO download availible at any time for permenant backup, lol. Installing the OS itself is fairly quick and easy, but it's the installing apps, settings, and tweaking it back up to where it was before that takes all the time, lol. But yea, for a permanant install like the RTM, better to be safe and just go fully clean on a freshly formatted disk...

    I am very busy...I have a network that I maintain (JOB).  The less installing the better for my time schedule LOL...I am still a dreamer though....I am under the impression because we helped develop the thing that we should be entitiled to some sort of compensation!  If not for our feedback there would be no Final version to launch; a half price discount or something as a direct result of our loyalty to help get the Final Release off the servers, on to the shelves, and into the hands of consumers. 

    Also with respect to the above post I think that is a good idea because if you really utilize the Beta like you are supposed to (for testing purposes) you have lots of programs to reinstall because of this; yes, to reinstall 7 would kill me it would just add on to the pile.  I myself make sure that if I am going to test a Beta that I have several tb's of hdd space for this...This Beta has been installed on a 4tb quad boot highend workstation; therefore, I have more that enough space and several different OS installations to fall back on in the event of an emergency.  Moreover, I make it a habit not to save things to the C: Drive and I have a seperate drive just for my personal files and documents.  In addition, I have taken the liberty of backing these things up.  I also have Vista/XP/SuSe installed just in case...Hey you can never be too safe...
    Alandra
    Tuesday, May 26, 2009 2:43 PM
  • Alandra -

    The one thing everybody seems to be forgetting when they make comments like the one you're quoting - Windows comes in multiple flavors. Most consumers won't see anything except Home Premium and Professional - but we're testing Ultimate - which won't be seen much, if at all at the retail level. The plan as I've heard it told is to make Ultimate only available as an Anytime Upgrade.

    So when the final bits do arrive, and you're only needing Home Premium or Pro, how exactly DO you downgrade Windows from Ultimate to Home Premium or Pro? The only way I can think of would be to back up, nuke and pave then restore your data.
    Tuesday, May 26, 2009 7:01 PM
  • Two thoughts occur to me:

    1.  I "upgraded" from Beta to RC without wiping and reinstalling.   Whether the same trick will work for RC to retail will be an interesting question!   I'll give it a try and see if it works, and if so how stable things are.   I can always do the "wipe and reinstall" if I have to.

    2.  Like others on here, I use drive C only for the Windows installation and software that needs to be on C.   Everything else is on other logical drives on other HDs.   Worst case, I hope, just means reinstalling software, then pointing it at the appropriate places for data etc.   It would still be a pain, but not the "wipe everything and start from scratch" that otherwise would have been.

    I was close to dumping Windows altogether, to go 100% Linux.   Then the Linux machine threw a hissy fit.   By the time I had it working again, most of the stuff on it was lost.   Windows has never done that to me...
    Thursday, May 28, 2009 10:24 PM
  • Keith -

    1.) It won't likely work well. Remember, we were testing Win 7 Ultimate for both the Beta and the RC. But which version of Win 7 do you think you're likley to be buying when it's released? Home Premium or Professional? Ultimate will be available only as an Anytime Upgrade. You'll need one or the other first...

    And there's no way to "downgrade" Windows from Ultimate to one of the lesser versions. So, I'm thinking it's not likely to be an option to upgrade from the RC to the RTM version.

    2.) Eh.. It's a pain, but then again, it's not unexpected.
    Thursday, May 28, 2009 11:48 PM
  • What does RTM mean?
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 8:08 AM
  • Release To Manufacturing - i.e. It's reached it's final stage and will be released to the public for general sale.
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 8:13 AM
  • "Release To Manufacturing" means what it says. Manufacturers will get copies to build their machines. That's also a last stage to clear compatibility issues. The public release ("General Availability") is another thing.
    Mobile AMD64 3000+, VIA Apollo K8T800 chipset, 1 G RAM, ATIRadeonMobility 9700, 20x DVDRW, C:XPSP3 (55G),D:WIN7 (25G),F:DATA (250G)
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 9:53 AM
  • Well I can't speak for Microsoft but RTM (Release To Manufacturing) in the past meant the code was frozen, given to the plant that stamps the CD or DVDs and packages the product so it ready to be shipped to stores and computer manufactures. Since the Windows 7 RTM date is about 3 to 4 weeks away they are probably busy doing some last minute changes, integration and regresssion testing.

    As good or bad Windows 7 turns out to be (and I think it looks good) the key to success is marketing to the general public both for new PC sales and getting old Windows XP die hards like me to move to 7. It's no secret that corporate customers are very slow to change (and for good reason) so it's up to the public to decide the fate of 7 (will it be a luck number or craps/seven out). 
    JS
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 2:42 PM
  • Hi J W,

    I don't speak for MS either and the term "RTM" has no official definition. But you must admit that nearly 4 months from end of June (supposed RTM release) to end of October (official GA announcement) is a looong time for stamping DVDs or packages. That should be done in days.
    Mobile AMD64 3000+, VIA Apollo K8T800 chipset, 1 G RAM, ATIRadeonMobility 9700, 20x DVDRW, C:XPSP3 (55G),D:WIN7 (25G),F:DATA (250G)
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 4:08 PM
  • You forget the pipeline which may go something like this.

    1) You have more than one plant stamping/pressing DVDs.
    2) Each plant needs to submit a stamped DVD for each version which will be validated as a good clone of the master.
    3) Packaging/container review to spot any errors.
    4) Shipping to licensed distributers. (Transit security, storage security, tracking who has what in case it's highjacked)
    5) Distributers ship to retailers in advance so they have time to stock the shelves.
    6) Behind all this is the legal agreements between all parties involved.
    7) And other stuff that crops up to make what seems like an easy job turn into a problem sometimes.
    JS
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 5:06 PM
  • I won't disagree. My only point was that "RTM" by no means is a "public release". The only things that Mr. Joe Public - if he isn't a friend of leaked builds - will ever see when he buys a new pc or updates his Windows version, are OEM versions and boxed versions. Neither of those will have a "RTM" stamp.
    Mobile AMD64 3000+, VIA Apollo K8T800 chipset, 1 G RAM, ATIRadeonMobility 9700, 20x DVDRW, C:XPSP3 (55G),D:WIN7 (25G),F:DATA (250G)
    Monday, June 22, 2009 9:13 AM
  • What would be interesting is to see if the RTM version and the GA version are identical.

    Also
    Boxed version DVD = Score an A+
    OEM DVD = B-
    Recovery DVD = D
    Recovery Partition = F (PC never should be sold this way)
    JS
    Monday, June 22, 2009 2:08 PM
  • JW -

    The RTM version and GA versions should be identical. The M in RTM mean Manufacturing - they take the "Gold" code and ship the image off to the people who manufacture the DVDs.

    The more interesting thing will be to see how many patches will be available come November's Patch Tuesday-pallooza.
    Monday, June 22, 2009 7:06 PM
  • See my post dated: Sunday, June 21, 2009 2:42 PM

    And yes the code should be frozen when the RTM master is created. But the term "Slipstreaming" was a practice of including some code changes without making a version change so who knows for certain, only Microsoft.

    Yes and the first patch Tuesday or even earlier will tell the tail, however keep in mind that 7 and Vista have some comonality so a Vista patch could also apply to to Windows 7. It will be the patches that are unique to 7 and 7 only that will be the real proof, and they may be later in comming.

    All that said if I can get a legal RTM .ISO I look forward to seeing just how many of my old Windows XP applications migrate over to Windows 7 and run without any issues when I use the upgrade path. 
    Helpful Votes

    JS
    Monday, June 22, 2009 9:20 PM
  • JW -


    Yes, and slipstreaming is generally done when a full service pack is released. Microsoft will slipstream a SP1, SP2 or SP3 into the installation routines of the original release to make things more convenient for end users.. My XP SP2 CD  and my Vista SP1 DVD both come with everything patch-wise built in.

    There were a few articles on how to slipstream XP SP3 into an SP2 CD when that came out.

    The thing is - slipstreaming modifies the ISO image - the one that gets stamped onto the DVDs. Once the masters are stamped, they generally don't go out of their way to modify it, unless something really ugly pops up. It costs quite a chunk of change to have a company (or companies) make the master - and reproduce it in volume. Once that process has begun, it's not likely to be changed unless there's a darn good reason - like someone, somewhere slipped a virus or other malware into the ISO somehow.

    That doesn't mean development stops the day the code goes Gold. In fact, there was mention in one of the Microsoft Blogs (Engineering Windows 7, I believe. I can't find the reference to it at the moment) that development will continue once the code's gone Gold right up until GA and beyond - to make it a better experience for one and all. But those fixes won't get onto the DVDs at any point (except when SP1 arrives - since SP's generally include a roll up of all fixes to that point in time).
    Monday, June 22, 2009 10:27 PM
  • Gads! I installed the Professional version of the RC thinking that I could just enter an official license key when the final version of Windows 7 ships. Then I discovered that the temporary license keys for the RC won't work with the Professional version -- you have to pick "Ultimate". That got me wondering how I fall back to Professional when the time comes, and that all led me here.

    So we'll have to completely reinstall EVERYTHING when Windows 7 officially releases??? OMFG. I've already spent a WEEK configuring this machine with all the software that I use on a regular basis (Office, a ton of development tools, browsers, QuickBooks, etc.) so having to do it all over again is a royal PITA. You'd think that Microsoft would show us testers a LITTLE bit of gratitude by at least providing an easy way to transition our test machines to legitimate licenses. How hard would it be to release an "RC-to-RTM" patch, for God's sake? I understand that they can't easily provide "downgrades" from Ultimate to Professional, but it would have been a LOT nicer to:

    (a) provide working license keys for non-Ultimate RC installations, and then
    (b) provide RC-to-RTM patches for all four versions when release date rolls around.

    It's not like any of this would have cost Microsoft any actual money, and it would be a nice way to tell us testers, "We appreciate your help."
    Wednesday, July 15, 2009 8:58 PM
  • rmfii -

    Yup. We will have to reinstall everything. But that isn't entirely unexpected. It was clearly stated on the page before you started your download that this would be the case. That we should NOT install Windows 7 on a production machine, rather on a spare computer we can do testing on so if something were to go wrong, we won't be stuck between a rock and a hard place. We were warned not to get too comfortable, that Windows 7 Beta and later, the RC were temporary - and that we'd need to install the final RTM code as an upgrade to Vista or XP or cleanly.

    You assume that it would be a simple matter to downgrade Win 7 Ultimate to Pro or Home Premium. And if all that was needed to be done was to delete a few files, you might have a point - but then there's that darn registry. There's a lot of stuff that would need to be removed and other things would need to be rejiggered in order to make that happen.

    There's also the possibility that an upgrade from RC to RTM would NOT replace certain files - resulting in problems. They DO appreciate our efforts. If they didn't, they'd let us upgrade and wouldn't care that our experience with the RTM version was spotless.
    Wednesday, July 15, 2009 9:24 PM
  • Well, we were "sorta" warned, actually. I don't recall anything explicitly saying, "Everything you do on this machine will have to wiped out in order to install the real Windows 7." That would have been a lot more direct than, "Don't put this on a production machine." There hasn't been a Windows version since 3.0 that didn't put your machine at risk of catastrophic failure, so the warning that you cite falls a little flat. I was like, "Well, yeah, it's Windows, after all."

    BTW, I made NO assumption about downgrades, so don't say I did. In fact, I explicitly explained how this would NOT be necessary. I installed the Professional version of Windows 7 precisely because that's what I already bought via the "Vista w/ tech guarantee" offer. I don't need or want a downgrade -- I just want a way to use the license for Win7 Professional that I already bought without having to reinstall over top of the Win7 Professional RC that I just spent the last week configuring and testing. This isn't rocket science. Heck, there probably won't even be enough file changes from RC to RTM to fill up a CD.

    To make matters worse, I just opened up my Vista package, and it appears that the "tech guarantee" coupon only gives you an UPGRADE license for Windows 7. This means that I'll have to:

    (1) uninstall Windows 7 Professional RC,
    (2) install Vista Business SP1,
    (3) install Windows 7 Professional RTM Upgrade, and
    (4) reinstall and reconfigure all of my software.

    ... all to get right back to where I was last night. There's apparently NO WAY for me to do a clean Windows 7 Professional RTM install on this machine, despite having just spent $160 on the license for it. Frankly, that sucks.

    I'm not asking for a free lunch here -- I'm just saying that Microsoft needs to make the RC upgradeable to the RTM version for the same configuration (whether it be Home, Professional, or Ultimate) with a valid license key. This kind of thing isn't difficult, so the lack of such an upgrade path speaks volumes about how little respect / appreciation Microsoft has for its testers. They think that the time ONE GUY at Microsoft would spend creating such a patch is more valuable than ALL THE TIME spent by ALL THE TESTERS to reinstall and reconfigure their machines.
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 1:41 AM
  • I was just wondering if MS is going to run a pre-order discount on the full RTM version like they are, now, on the upgrade. I don't mind spending 1oo bucks on ultimate but I really don't want to spend 2oo.
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 2:27 AM
  • rmfii -

    Really? I don't think most people would put ANYTHING on their computers if things were at such dire risk as you make it out to be. I doubt Windows would be on 90 odd percent of all computers if it was nearly as bad as that.

    Microsoft made the Ultimate version available mainly because of two reasons:

    1.) They want everything tested.
    2.) People would be upset if they only got to test Home Premium or Professional. They'd accuse Microsoft of holding out on them or something.

    So what it boils down to is you didn't take the warning seriously. You thought, "Microsoft - what a sense of humor! HAHA! They're so funny!" or some such and now you're up the proverbial crick...

    Bummer.

    Next time, (if it ever comes) you might consider taking the warnings a bit more seriously...
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 10:49 AM
  • rmfii
    There is no Windows 7 Professional RC, the only RC build is 7100 all others are BETA.
    7100 is Win 7 Ultimate

    quote ...
    I installed the Professional version of Windows 7 precisely because that's what I already bought via the "Vista w/ tech guarantee" offer. I don't need or want a downgrade --
    unquote
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 11:25 AM
  • Bubba -- There most certainly IS a Windows 7 Professional RC. Just don't enter the License Key on that page in the install, and the very next page gives you the option. I figured I could enter the license key once I had the OS up and running AND MY CUT-AND-PASTE was working. Call me crazy. I guess you don't mind hunting and pecking for 24-odd random alpha-numeric characters.

    Wolfie -- Explain to me how we're supposed to "use Windows 7 in the way we would normally" if we don't migrate our stuff over to it? I guess you don't do any software development, so you'd have no clue.
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 5:05 PM
  • If MS requires me to do a clean install I will return to OS-X at a very high rate of speed.
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 6:04 PM
  • Bubba -

    There actually IS a Beta for all of Windows 7's editions - Starter to Professional - it's just NOT a public test. It's limited to ISVs like Dell, HP, etc... After all, they have to make sure that Win 7 works correctly regardless of the edition on their hardware.

    rmfii -

    In order to get to where you are now, with Win 7 Pro RC build 7100 installed, you would have had to modify the ISO by removing a file - ei.cfg. And all that got you is a 30 day evaluation copy. This has been documented here. But it's not entirely surprising - given it's been documented that the Windows 7 DVDs will contain ALL of the editions.

    As far as things go - there's a world of difference between "testing Windows 7" and "running Windows 7 as a production OS".

    And for the record... Yes, I have done software development - I've written code, organized beta tests, managed the testing, and then some.
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 8:23 PM
  • If the DVD contains all the versions then it's the key code that the user enters that will determine which version gets installed.

     


    JS
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 9:19 PM
  • J -

    Yup. That's exactly how it works. In fact, the retail upgrade disk is the same as the full retail disk - except for the printing on the label. The key difference is in the product key. This is how Microsoft can do an Anytime Upgrade without going through a bunch of contortions. You launch an Anytime Upgrade, tell it what version you want, insert credit card number and you get the new product key. You run the setup from the old DVD, insert the new product key and you do an in place upgrade to whatever version you bought. VERY convenient.
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 11:47 PM
  • Yes, it's a nice way of distributing the product. It just underscores my point, though -- all Microsoft needs to do is generate a dozen keys for each of the other three versions, and we could test all four configurations rather than just the "Ultimate" one. It would take someone at Microsoft all of 15 minutes.
    Friday, July 17, 2009 12:40 AM
  • Wolfie
    I said all others are BETA did I not???

    The PUBLIC RC for testing is Ultimate is it not?

    If you read the info provided before loading the RC or any BETA OS for that matter you should expect to do a clean install when it goes Gold.


    As for installing / reinstalling apps it is a pain but something I knew would be need to be done, I am using MANY "portable / network / cloud apps" on my Win 7 Installs
    The move to the cloud is in the cards, so why not start now.
    Win 7 is only a primary OS on netbooks for me. when it goes Gold and they release SP1, I will think about moving desktops to 7.

    • Proposed as answer by iminor Friday, July 17, 2009 12:57 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by Lawrence GarvinEditor Sunday, July 19, 2009 1:12 AM
    Friday, July 17, 2009 11:06 AM
  • I don't mind doing a clean install. What I do mind is having to re-install Vista or XP before I can UPGRADE to Win7. I want to use a Win7 Upgrade disk to do a clean install. Fortunatly, on my main system I set up a dual boot with XP and RC so now I will just reformat the RC partition and install the Final Win7 using an upgrade disk that I purchased for $50. There are other advantages of the dual boot configuration. I use the Win7 defrag on both the Win7 and XP partitions and I use the XP defrag to analyze and get a graph of the before and after defrag results. This is just an example of the many areas where having both XP and Win7 has advantages. I have desktop systems running both XP and Vista. It is less expensive to buy a second hard drive and install Win7 Upgrade in a dual boot configuration then to do a clean install with the full Win7.
    Friday, July 17, 2009 1:10 PM
  • yes it is
    Saturday, July 18, 2009 8:06 PM
  • Very nice of MS to let us take a peek at Win7 for free

    RTM are always on top, must explain why I spent a full day downloading patches for WinServer Foundation right out of the box!

    Now if MS doesn't wake and smell the bacon, dismal revenue are in sight. Like nobody upgrading to Win7 as an example. It is very nice to think about the corporate giant with 10,000 licenses and more, one sucessful sale pitch and you bring a million a year in revenue at a minimum.

    So lets go back to reality, the SBS market or to be frank, the MSB, the Miniscule Small Business, less than 10 employees, where one of them is the tech guru. Why don't they hire a pro? $$$$$

    They sometime have to plan in advance, the future for example and they do not like changing what's working well. So they have a mix of computers, most running XP pro, one or two on Vista and maybe one on 2000. Like mine for example.

    Why 2000? It works for the apps that's on it, has done so for years, the computer is not dead and working well. Did you know that there is no way to move your setting files to Vista or Win 7 using these marvelous USB cable? Software will not take work on 2000. So, sometime soon, MS has my address, I will illegally upgrade 2000 to XP, only to be able to transfer some files using the software provided. I know, I can move this thru the network, a cd or whatever. As anybody been able to do successully? Not me. Must be dum, all these years around those MS boxes, so old that I remember when MS-DOS looked like Linux today. Anybody remember the Apricot or the Matrox "flavour" of Dos 1? I do.

    So I installed Win7 Beta on a Vista machine, works well. Did a clean install on a another computer, hit the Adoble little problem...

    So here are the suggestions:
    A) A slow but sure upgrade path from 98 on must be provided. With minimal guarantee that programs will work. The software that MS used to tell you if your computer can be ugraded could be expanded to check for apps, no need to check them all, if you're using your former brother-in-law software to check the speed of your electrical drill, MS will say, no go. But apps from MS, Adobe, Corel and the like should be recongnize and a proper warning issued.
    B) The upgrade should not be guaranteed by MS. And it should only be done on computer that passes the Vista test.
    C) It should be a three step effort.
    C-1) A mirror of your existing computer done on an external device.
    C-2) A clean install of Win 7 on this computer
    C-3) A rebuilding of the registry of the and ONLY the apps cleared by MS, including the reentry of apps validation. This should be done with and only with an Internet connexion to check for upgrades and patches.
    MS should warn CLEARLY that the process is the responsability of the user, that numerous reboot and manual intervention of the user are expected and that the process could last a couple of hours. Which is less than a couple of days.
    D) MS must, I repeat MUST, allow Beta tester of Win7 to upgrade their computer to and only to Ultimate and only in a limited time period, I would suggest January 1st 2010 to February 28th. This would permit MS to breathe a little after the October release. The upgrade should only be available online and users should be warned that MS cannot be held responsible for future problems relating to renmant and fragment of past code. Obviiously, this would only apply to build 7100 which should be very close if not identical to RTM.

    JYD
    Wednesday, August 5, 2009 7:19 PM
  • I am wondering if by 'upgrade' they mean you have to 'prove' you have an existing OS license, like the XP upgrade where you simply pop in a win98 cd when it asks, where in this case you would pop in your XP disk?
    Thursday, August 6, 2009 9:25 PM
  • If using Windows Easy Transfer from a Win7 prerelease make shure to use the version from the final DVD (...\support\migwiz) on the old machine.

    With the final WET my Live Mail and Outlook data was transfered nicely.
    Live Mail Data was not transferred by on of the earlier versions of WET.
    Sunday, August 9, 2009 11:58 AM
  • Hi everybody,

    actually, there is a way and it is described in an article Engineering Windows 7 - Delivering a quality upgrade experience (http://blogs.msdn.com/e7/archive/2009/04/07/delivering-a-quality-upgrade-experience.aspx) - I am currently upgrading one of my Virtual Machines and it's working ;) However, it is strongly advised to do a clean install.

    1. Download the ISO as you did previously and burn the ISO to a DVD.
    2. Copy the whole image to a storage location you wish to run the upgrade from (a bootable flash drive or a directory on any partition on the machine running the pre-release build).
    3. Browse to the sources directory.
    4. Open the file cversion.ini in a text editor like Notepad.
    5. Modify the MinClient build number to a value lower than the down-level build. For example, change 7100 to 7000 (pictured below).
    6. Save the file in place with the same name.
    7. Run setup like you would normally from this modified copy of the image and the version check will be bypassed.

    Regards,
    Aleks

    Sunday, August 9, 2009 8:09 PM
  • Aleks -

    That's all well and good... Except that you've still got an issue with the fact that the Beta and RC versions are both Ultimate.

    Unless you're upgrading to Windows 7 Ultimate RTM, you're still going to wind up having to do a CLEAN INSTALL because you can't downgrade from Ultimate to Home Premium or Professional or any other edition of Windows 7.

    That's also assuming that the CVERSION.INI file even exists in the final installation package.
    Monday, August 10, 2009 3:35 AM
  • Actually, you can go from RC Ultimate to RTM Enterprise.  There's a registry hack that you have to perform on the RC version, but it's REALLY easy. I did it...twice.
    Thursday, August 20, 2009 2:29 PM
  • Will this method work for upgrading Win7RC on a VHD also?
    Monday, August 24, 2009 7:25 PM
  • Hmmmm.

    Win 7 had a fit on my machine (which was till then dual-boot XP Pro and Win 7) and locked up both the Win 7 and the XP installation.   I'd already pretty much given up using XP so I wasn't unduly bothered.  I reinstalled Win 7;  the XP installation is still there (I can see it, labelled as Drive X), but it won't boot and Win 7 won't recognise it.

    Do I have to wipe the RC of Win 7, then install XP Pro, then update to Win 7?   Or can I just wipe the RC and install from the Win 7 disks I get come the release date?   Seems like a couple of hours of wasted time if I have to reinstall XP Pro just to overwrite it.

    Monday, August 24, 2009 7:55 PM
  • So, there's no way --- even with the work around --- to install Windows 7 Professional RTM as an upgrade to the RC (since it's techincally a downgrade)? I just downloaded the RTM from MSDNAA and would love to just do an in-place upgrade. Really, really regret the fact that I even installed the RC as I could have just did an in-place upgrade with Vista.

    Debating whether to wait and see if MSDNAA puts up the Enterprise or Ultimate RTMs or just bite the bullet and to a clean install (I have tons of programs - many downloadable ones that would be difficult to reinstall due to activations, etc.)
    Wednesday, August 26, 2009 1:14 AM
  • http://www.lockergnome.com/blade/2009/04/08/windows-7-upgrade-beta-to-rc-to-rtm-milestone/

    This works fine. I have upgraded a RC machine to RTM using this method.

    It seems like Microsoft has a group of engineers devoted to annoy early adopters or something...
    Friday, September 11, 2009 10:42 AM
  • The answer to this question is wrong.

    Please read:
    http://blogs.msdn.com/e7/archive/2009/04/07/delivering-a-quality-upgrade-experience.aspx

    It is a post about upgrading from Beta to RC, but if you read near the bottom of the blog where he is explaining how to do it, you can read the following on how to upgrade from RC to Retail:

    These same steps will be required as we transition from the RC milestone to the RTM milestone.

    This is from an MSDN blog.

    Saturday, September 26, 2009 12:01 AM
  • Please share this registry hack. Thanks.
    Friday, October 9, 2009 5:26 PM
  • Well, I last posted here back in mid-July when Microsoft told us all to just reinstall everything to move from RC to RTM. That's such an insensitive load of bull that I decided to figure it out on my own. It turns out that the solution involves three different hacks that were all documented on the blogs back in July:

    (1) Install the RC version of Windows 7 that matches what you're buying. To do this, just don't enter a license key during the RC install, and the next page will let you choose your version (e.g. - "Professional" instead of "Ultimate").

    (2) Now, Microsoft didn't actually provide any license keys to versions of the RC build other than "Ultimate", so the install will normally expire in 30 days. But it turns out that you can reset the countdown timer on the RC version every 30 days for three months (slmgr -rearm). You can only do this three times, but I found that the computer doesn't actually shut down when the timer runs out -- it just turns the desktop background black and waits until you reboot. So you can eke a few extra days out of each cycle.

    (3) When you FINALLY get your RTM license key, edit the cversion.ini file in the RTM ISO to MinVersion=7000 and upgrade over top of the RC version. (It will think you're upgrading over Vista.)

    Unfortunately, most people missed the boat on Step #1 because the RC defaulted to Ultimate, and few people are buying that version. But if you skipped the license key during the RC install and chose the version that you're buying, it works. Voila! A painless upgrade from RC to RTM -- no thanks whatsoever to Microsoft or their innumerable fanboys.

    And yes, I'm sure I'll hear all about how this will result in an "unstable" OS, blah, blah, blah. I'm frankly not worried. I have backups, so if it crashes, the worst case is that I have to wipe everything and reinstall. I'll gladly take a "might have to waste my time doing that" over the "definitely have to waste time doing that" per Microsoft. Those of you who just use your machines for email and web browsing can reinstall to your heart's content -- it takes me a LOT longer.
    Monday, October 19, 2009 5:46 AM
  • worked like a charm. windows 7 rc ultimate to windows 7 retail professional. i spent days looking for this hack and no where to found except here. thanks gregrocker you rock! no need to delete ei.cfg in the sources directory as suggested by others like ed bott. makes no difference. just do this simple registry hack and you're good to go...
    Friday, October 23, 2009 7:29 AM
  • Guys,

    I currently run RC, and want to go to final.

    What do I buy?? The upgrade, or the the Full version???

    PS used to have vista pre installed.
    Saturday, October 24, 2009 6:57 PM
  • i used the upgrade version available to students for only $30. change the cversion.ini in the sources directory minclient=7000.0 and do the registry tweak noted by gregrocker.
    Sunday, October 25, 2009 3:40 PM
  • Guys,

    I currently run RC, and want to go to final.

    What do I buy?? The upgrade, or the the Full version???

    PS used to have vista pre installed.

    If you have a valid license for Vista (and pre-install counts), then you can buy the upgrade version of Windows 7. Microsoft will tell you that you have to roll back to Vista before installing Windows 7 final, but as the other posts here explain, that's not really necessary.
    Wednesday, October 28, 2009 7:49 PM
  • http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/3075/how-to-upgrade-the-windows-7-rc-to-rtm/

    That will give you specific instructions on how to do this.
    Thursday, December 31, 2009 3:29 AM
  • this link assumes one is upgrading from ultimate rc (default) to ultimate rtm. gregrocker posted above how to upgrade rc to a lower version like professional or home premium rtm...
    Thursday, December 31, 2009 5:22 AM
  • It's not possible and it's not practical!!!
    • Proposed as answer by steve2050 Friday, September 3, 2010 8:16 AM
    Friday, September 3, 2010 8:16 AM
  • Steve, to what do you refer?
    Drew - MS Partner / MS Beta Tester / Pres. Computer Issues
    Friday, September 3, 2010 1:50 PM
  • Yeah, I DID read... & I told you I remembered this from months ago... we never understood this weird scenario (considering the source) or agreed w/ it.  It only caused confusion & contraversy.

    Drew - MS Partner / MS Beta Tester / Pres. Computer Issues
    Friday, September 3, 2010 3:49 PM
  • There is no call or excuse for nastiness , insults or rudenes in this forum or anywhere else on this planet.

    You have done a fine job of making yourself look bad.

    We never agreed w/ nor did many of us get what they were trying to say or what Microsoft seemed to be suggesting.  The only sound or valid thing from them about using Upgrades for clean installs was the "Double Pass" method.

    There was nothing self-indulgent or uninformed in what I said but, your remarks are WAY out of line & been reported
    Drew - MS Partner / MS Beta Tester / Pres. Computer Issues
    Friday, September 3, 2010 4:15 PM
  • No, it's your trouble-making that has pulled it out of context... was an 'umbrella' reference to any such stuff, no matter the source that gets misused by people.

    & the thing that ruins this forum & the planet is people like you. 

    & your behavior has been further reported.
    Drew - MS Partner / MS Beta Tester / Pres. Computer Issues
    Friday, September 3, 2010 5:15 PM
  • Sorry but a posting to blog from a windows team member is NOT the official stand of Microsoft, the only "official" info about going from RC to RTM was in the info provided when we got the RC..and that was that we need to do a wipe and load.

    A blog is just blog any info posted in blog should taken at face value, which in this case is zero.

    Grits I really think you should lookup the term troll, you like to call people who are here helping people by trying to provide info, you on the other hand post NOTHING of value, you only try your best to discredit others.

    We all know who the REAL TROLL is here and is not Drew. No need to response I will pretend you made some remark and I will pretend to care, (really as I know anything you post is trash I would not read it anyway.

    Why don't you find something else to do with your time, maybe you can get back in school, what grade should you be in this year second or third???

     

     

     

    Friday, September 3, 2010 6:12 PM
  • Thank you Baba.  You have stated well what needed to be said.  I certainly agree, it is not you or I who are wasting time & space here or doing nothing more than just being a pain in the neck to others.

    Thanks again.  We can only trust that my reporting GnG will do some good.
    Drew - MS Partner / MS Beta Tester / Pres. Computer Issues
    Friday, September 3, 2010 6:58 PM
  • Please spend just a few mins to read, that is if you have time between you ranting.

    A personal BLOG is no way an "official source", If you want official, you got it, please notice I did not link to Personal BLOG, I posted a link to MICROSOFT technet library.

    And If i posted my opinion, it would just that MY opinion, I would not try to pass it off as FACT, me, I could care less what these folks do about upgrading from RC 2 RTM

    Pre-release in-place upgrades across milestones (for example, Windows 7 RC to Windows 7 RTM) are not supported.
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd772579(WS.10).aspx

    Grits,
    I really think you need to think before you type, I am in no way "self serving", nor would anyone in their right mind think myself or Drew are in it for anything other than to help folks who need / want it.

     I get NOTHING from this site, the little I have learn here would not amount to anything, I come here to help those who need it, so how would that be self serving, I do not put links back to my website as others do, I do try to get folks to pay me...I only give, I take nothing in return.

    I do not get angry because some child is ranting about something they no clue about, It would make no sense to angry at a child who does know any better, if fact we sit around and laugh at your postings..gives us a break from working.

    So please do us all a big favor, and find something else to do with your time and stop wasting the time those who are here to help with your nonsense.

    Now I would hope that the OFFICIAL source above would end this, I know you I would not count on it.

    Again thanks for the laugh everyone here enjoyed reading your OFFICIAL posts.

     

     

    Friday, September 3, 2010 9:29 PM
  • Moderators and MVPs are not Microsoft and VERY few even work for Microsoft, even if they do work for microsoft they can not change the FACTS, I do not need to dispute anything, I posted FACTS, you keep pointing to folks opinions, which carry about as weight as your opinion.

    now please can you just go away or add something of value to the discussion.

     

    Saturday, September 4, 2010 12:25 AM
  • 2 wee things...

    Yes, I am also here just to be helpful so it's certainly misguided to suggest self-indulgence being any amount of motivation.

    Why are we talking about this (topic) agin, now, anyway??  This was stuff for during Win7 beta testing... when Final Release was approaching & people were looking for ways to avoid, at the end of the day, actually having to buy the OS.  But, why are we rehashing it now, almost a year following the final release?  Isn't this 'old news'?  It's common knowledge the upgrade discs will do clean installs but, why an effort to resurect the banter, debate & messiness that was thought to have been left happily & gladly in the past (???)  Beats me @ this point in time, especially.  Was months ago & was good left there.
    Drew - MS Partner / MS Beta Tester / Pres. Computer Issues
    Saturday, September 4, 2010 9:55 AM
  • It would be good if these two guys could take their argument offline, and stop flooding my inbox with this stuff.  

     

    The question is well over a year old and the answer is irrelevant now.

    Saturday, September 4, 2010 10:09 AM
  • Sorry for the noise everyone, I guess GnG gets under my skin, and I should not let him / her do that.

    This old thread should be locked last year.... as Drew pointed it is no longer an issue.

    Once more SORRY for filling your inbox with noise of no value to the community. 

    Saturday, September 4, 2010 10:50 AM
  • Moderators - PLEASE lock this one.  I'm getting close to adding notifications from here to my spamlist.
    Saturday, September 4, 2010 2:19 PM