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Scan and Fix removable drive

    Question

  • When connecting various types of removable media (flash drives, external hard drives) Windows 7 asks, "Do you want to scan and fix ...?" The message continues by stating that "There might be a problem with some files on this device or disc. This can happen if you remove the device or disc before all files have been written to it." Two options are provided. The (reommended) option of "Scan and fix" states that it will prevent future problems when copying files to this device or disc. The other option is to continue without scanning.

    Is there anyone at Microsoft that can provide some detailed information on what Windows is looking at/for? After numerous searches I have been unable to find anything official or accurate regarding this operation in Windows. Additionally, what is Windows going to do to the device that will "prevent" any future problems when copying files to the device/disc? Making changes to the write caching for the device/disc has no affect at all. Running a chkdsk scan of the device/disc yeilds no problems found on the device. Several pages on the Web indicate users who have chosen the option to "Scan and fix" only to find some or all of their removable media no longer usable. Some official documentation of this Windows feature would be extremely helpful to have.
    Friday, January 29, 2010 6:29 AM

All replies

  • I guess even Microsoft can't answer this question. I love Windows, especially Windows 7, but I'm loving Mac more and more each day. Come on Microsoft, step up your game. You're losing people.
    Wednesday, April 07, 2010 2:21 PM
  • I guess even Microsoft can't answer this question. I love Windows, especially Windows 7, but I'm loving Mac more and more each day. Come on Microsoft, step up your game. You're losing people.

    Wednesday, April 07, 2010 2:21 PM
  • It is my understanding that when a removable storage device is connected to a system, there is a bit in the boot sector/ MFT which is activated to report that the device is connected, when a device is safely removed, that bit is deactivated, but if it is hot disconnected it remains active. Windows 7 and Vista check for this bit upon connection and suggest running chkdsk on the drive if it has been hot disconnected.

    I have never known of any issues from hot disconnecting modern equipment, but the possibility is still there. It is always recommended to remove the device properly (through the removable devices menu in the system tray) to prevent data degradation. Aside from that best practice, I don't believe any "preventative" measures are taken nor does it do anything more sophisticated than run a disk check.

    I hope this helps!

    Brandon

    Saturday, April 10, 2010 12:22 AM
  • Doesn't really help. I never hot disconnect my drives but still get the scan and fix message. After selecting that option some drives get a capacity of 0 bytes and therefore useless paperweights. Microsoft need to get this sorted.
    Monday, February 27, 2012 12:33 PM
  • This is a peer-to-peer support forum, and while Microsoft employees might stop in from time to time, the vast majority of posters here have no relationship to Microsoft at all.

    I mention this because your post seems to expect Microsoft engineering to have answered you question directly.  While not impossible, its highly unlikely.

    DAS

    Monday, February 27, 2012 6:52 PM
  • Doesn't really help. I never hot disconnect my drives but still get the scan and fix message. After selecting that option some drives get a capacity of 0 bytes and therefore useless paperweights. Microsoft need to get this sorted.

    mijami: since this forum is aimed at multimedia related issues, I suggest that you repost in the Windows 7 Hardware Compatibility forum:

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itprohardware/threads


    Tim De Baets
    http://www.bm-productions.tk

    Thursday, March 01, 2012 8:48 PM