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Windows 7 DVD not booting

    Question

  • I set up a dual partition for W7 using partition magic.  When you restart inorder to install W7 the DVD does not boot.  I have USB kb and mouse.  If I try to load the DVD while up in XP it brings up the install but when I select the new partition it doesn't recognize it.  I assume that is why you have to boot the install disk to get the install to work (at least I hope).  However, I don't get the option to install.  The DVD begins to spinup but then nothing.  I just get loaded into Bootmagic with the option to boot select partitions.  If I select the one I setup for W7 I just get a message "Preparing system to install "Windows 7" and then nothing (I called the new partition Windows 7).  Help please.
    • Changed type ds1001 Saturday, January 31, 2009 7:47 PM
    Saturday, January 31, 2009 4:56 PM

Answers

  • ds1001,

    Please uninstall Boot Magic. You won't need it, because when Windows detects that there are two operating systems installed, it will automatically present you with the choice to boot into Win7 or the "older operating system".

    Then, before attempting to install Win7, verify that your new partition is displayed when you click on "my computer". If not open, Control Panel, Administrative Tools, Computer management, Disk Management, and quick format your new partition as NTFS, and assign it a drive letter that's not already in use. Reboot, and verify that you see your new partition in "my computer".

    Now, with your computer booted into XP and connected to the internet (so that the installer can download necessary updates), insert your install DVD drive (it is a DVD drive, not just a CD drive, right?) and select install. Choose clean install, rather than upgrade, and it will show you all your drives/partitions and ask you to select the one you want to install in. It will then tell you that it must reboot to do the installation.

    When it reboots, since the computer is already under the influence of the installer, it should take itself right through the place where you would usually have to "press any key to boot from CD". In case it doesn't, reboot, and when the "press any key ...." comes on the screen, hit enter.

    During the installation your internet connection might be lost because your network adapter will need a Vista driver to run in Win7. You can complete the installation before worrying about that. (On one older box on which I was running XP, the network adapter was on the motherboard, and the manufacturer hadn't provided Vista drivers, so I temporarily installed a separate PCI network adapter card that was Vista certified, in order to connect to the internet. Windows Update then offered me an upgrade driver for the on-board adapter, which got it working, so I could remove the PCI card.)


    Let us know how it goes.
    Sunday, February 01, 2009 11:42 PM

All replies

  • Hi
    If you want help first change type of your post to question.
    Saturday, January 31, 2009 7:18 PM
  • I used imgburn to burn the disk at 1X speed.  I notice that the file type is UDF for the disk that I burned.  Is that what it should be in order to be able to boot?  Also, I did try the disk on another computer and it works there.  Is there a setting somewhere that designates bootable file formats?
    Saturday, January 31, 2009 10:35 PM
  • Original file format that is available on windows 7 download site is ISO.

    To boot from DVD you must set you system to boot from DVD.

    To set your system to boot from DVD you must set your DVD as first boot device in BIOS boot menu, or you can try to invoke boot selection menu as press F8 while on POST(power on self test) screen
    Saturday, January 31, 2009 11:10 PM
  • I do have the DVD as the first boot device in the bios.  The DVD image burned is UDF format is that the right format?
    Saturday, January 31, 2009 11:27 PM
  • From where you get windows7 setup in this format?

    On Microsoft web site it is in iso file format!

    Right file format is iso.

    Also you have few seconds to press some key on KB or it will boot from gard drive
    Sunday, February 01, 2009 1:07 AM
  • Hi ds1001,
    The Universal Disk Format (UDF) is a format specification of a file system for storing files on optical media. It is an implementation of the ISO/IEC 13346 standard (also known as ECMA-167). It is considered to be a replacement of ISO 9660, and today is widely used for (re)writable optical media ( from WIKIPEDIA)

    the problem that you might experience is that you might not burn the image as BOOTABLE disc!
    Dear VEntsislav,
    if the disk where bootable, it should bring a text on the screen : to boot from cd press any key, and if this not come there might be 2 problems
    * non bootable disc
    * booting from cd is not enabled in BIOS

    Hope this hepls

    Erdal

    Sunday, February 01, 2009 2:36 AM
    Moderator
  • @ds1001

    I will ask my normal question.

    Did you make a disk with the ISO on it, or did you make a disk from the ISO?  You will want to do the latter.

    If you extracted the files from the ISO and then burned a DVD, that is not the proper way to make a bootable, OS installation DVD.

    Since you used ImgBurn to make the DVD, ensure you selected the Write Image file to disk option.

     

    Sunday, February 01, 2009 3:04 AM
  • Erdal Ozkaya said:

    Hi ds1001,
    The Universal Disk Format (UDF) is a format specification of a file system for storing files on optical media. It is an implementation of the ISO/IEC 13346 standard (also known as ECMA-167). It is considered to be a replacement of ISO 9660, and today is widely used for (re)writable optical media ( from WIKIPEDIA)

    the problem that you might experience is that you might not burn the image as BOOTABLE disc!
    Dear VEntsislav,
    if the disk where bootable, it should bring a text on the screen : to boot from cd press any key, and if this not come there might be 2 problems
    * non bootable disc
    * booting from cd is not enabled in BIOS

    Hope this hepls

    Erdal


    Dear Erdal Ozkaya

    1. I have not problem with my windows 7 setup

    2. I do not know if there is or there is not message on its computer and why it does not boot, and what he do at all

    3. This also is from wikipedia:

    An ISO image is an archive file (also known as a disk image) of an optical disc in a format defined by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). This format is supported by many software vendors. ISO image files typically have a file extension of .ISO but Mac OS X ISO images often have the extension .CDR. The name ISO is taken from the ISO 9660 file system used with CD-ROM media, but an ISO image can also contain UDF file system because UDF is backward-compatible with ISO 9660

    As we see ISO is file format, but UDF is file system, that is not the same

    So rigtt gile format of win 7 setip is ISO.

    I cannot know from where he/she is got setup file and why he/she says it is UDF file while original file is ISO and must have file extension ISO.
    Sunday, February 01, 2009 3:36 AM
  • I may be leading people down the wrong path.  I originally loaded the iso from the MS site, then burned the iso (intact) to a DVD using imgburn.  When I put the disk in the DVD player and select properties on the DVD (using file explorer) it says the file system is UDF.  That does not appear to be my problem.  As said earlier the DVD will boot on other PCs in my house but not the one I am trying to install on.  I have Boot Magic installed which is providing me with a choice of my original XP partition or the newly created Windows 7 partition.  Boot Magic comes up before the DVD boots and I do not get any opportunity to press a key to boot from CD or DVD.  Hope that clears things up a bit.
    Sunday, February 01, 2009 4:05 AM
  • Now it is clear to me finally :)

    Your DVD is not first boot device or it have some problem.

    To be sure your DVD have not problem disable in bios all other boot devices(all hdd, including NIC,USB and floppy) except this DVD drive, save settings and reboot.
    If it cannot boot then there is some problem with MB BIOS or DVD drive or DVD drive data cable

    If you cannot boot from dvd, just run windows7 setup from within your existing windows xp
    Sunday, February 01, 2009 4:26 AM
  • Erdal, I had the same problem as you and apparently my Dell Dimension 8300 was not setup to boot from DVD! Go figure!

    Anyway, after searching around I found this post and followed the directions to install Windows 7 without booting from the DVD. Everything went as the guy described it and I am writing this post from my Windows 7 system.

    http://www.intowindows.com/installing-windows-7-without-using-dvdusb-drive-method-2/

    Give it a try and if you have any issues post here and we can help you.

    Sunday, February 01, 2009 4:30 AM
  • One of thing that I have tried.  I have tried installing W7 into my new partition while running XP.  I get the install started up until it is time to choose my partition for installing and it says that it does not recognize it.  My partition that i created is a primary type and the C: partition is a "system" type.  Any ideas what I might be doing wrong there.  Again, I am using partition magic and selecting the add a new operating system option.
    Sunday, February 01, 2009 5:31 AM
  • Did you follow the directions in http://www.intowindows.com/installing-windows-7-without-using-dvdusb-drive-method-2/. I downloaded and installed Virtual Clone Drive and then mounted the ISO file to it and then installed.

    You cannot install straight from Windows XP without doing the steps mentioned above! 
    Sunday, February 01, 2009 6:05 AM
  • Yes I did follow the instructions from the above link and got exactly the same result as I did when I try to install from the DVD while running XP.  Unless I am missing something VirtualClone is just allowing you to mount the iso file which is the same thing as burning a disk and then putting it in the DVD drive.
    Sunday, February 01, 2009 2:02 PM
  • ds1001,

    Please uninstall Boot Magic. You won't need it, because when Windows detects that there are two operating systems installed, it will automatically present you with the choice to boot into Win7 or the "older operating system".

    Then, before attempting to install Win7, verify that your new partition is displayed when you click on "my computer". If not open, Control Panel, Administrative Tools, Computer management, Disk Management, and quick format your new partition as NTFS, and assign it a drive letter that's not already in use. Reboot, and verify that you see your new partition in "my computer".

    Now, with your computer booted into XP and connected to the internet (so that the installer can download necessary updates), insert your install DVD drive (it is a DVD drive, not just a CD drive, right?) and select install. Choose clean install, rather than upgrade, and it will show you all your drives/partitions and ask you to select the one you want to install in. It will then tell you that it must reboot to do the installation.

    When it reboots, since the computer is already under the influence of the installer, it should take itself right through the place where you would usually have to "press any key to boot from CD". In case it doesn't, reboot, and when the "press any key ...." comes on the screen, hit enter.

    During the installation your internet connection might be lost because your network adapter will need a Vista driver to run in Win7. You can complete the installation before worrying about that. (On one older box on which I was running XP, the network adapter was on the motherboard, and the manufacturer hadn't provided Vista drivers, so I temporarily installed a separate PCI network adapter card that was Vista certified, in order to connect to the internet. Windows Update then offered me an upgrade driver for the on-board adapter, which got it working, so I could remove the PCI card.)


    Let us know how it goes.
    Sunday, February 01, 2009 11:42 PM