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can vista ultimate 32 and 64 bit dual boot ? RRS feed

  • Question

  • can vista ultimate 32 and 64 bit dual boot ? reason why is because I need vista 64 to run cinema 4d on and 32 bit for every thing eilse.

    Saturday, August 23, 2008 9:32 AM

Answers

  • Yes, we can create dual boot with 32bit and 64bit Windows Vista systems. There are something you need to note.

     

    1. If you only have one Product Key and it is being used at the 32bit system, you have to purchase another Product Key to Activate the 64bit System.

    2. Install 32bit Windows Vista system first, and then install the 64bit sytem.

    3. You can only install the 64bit system in Windows Recovery Environment (Win RE). That means you cannot run the installation disc in 32bit Windows Vista system, but boot with the installation DVD and install 64bit Vista system.

    4. Install the two systems on two different partitions.

    5. If you would like to modify the name of the boot entries in the startup boot menu, refer the following articles.

     

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc721886.aspx

    http://www.pronetworks.org/forum/about69913.html

     

    Tuesday, August 26, 2008 9:44 AM

All replies

  • Yes, we can create dual boot with 32bit and 64bit Windows Vista systems. There are something you need to note.

     

    1. If you only have one Product Key and it is being used at the 32bit system, you have to purchase another Product Key to Activate the 64bit System.

    2. Install 32bit Windows Vista system first, and then install the 64bit sytem.

    3. You can only install the 64bit system in Windows Recovery Environment (Win RE). That means you cannot run the installation disc in 32bit Windows Vista system, but boot with the installation DVD and install 64bit Vista system.

    4. Install the two systems on two different partitions.

    5. If you would like to modify the name of the boot entries in the startup boot menu, refer the following articles.

     

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc721886.aspx

    http://www.pronetworks.org/forum/about69913.html

     

    Tuesday, August 26, 2008 9:44 AM
  •  

    ok so make 2 partitions first.

    then put the 32 bit on the first partition like usuall.

     then put the 64 bit dvd in the computer and tell it to boot from the dvd first so it will not go to c drive. then install the 64 bit on the second partition.

     is that correct ?

    Tuesday, August 26, 2008 6:54 PM
  • Yes, it is exactly correct.

    Wednesday, August 27, 2008 1:25 AM
  • Followed the instructions to install Vista x32 first.  Then installed Vista x64 from the DVD using Win RE.

    Here's my question:  How do I get the Vista x64 install to NOT use C: as its boot drive letter when I'm booted into it?

    I have enough large hard drives already on the machine for each OS to have a dedicated drive for each install (one is "C" and the other is "D").

    When I boot into this new x64 install, it becomes "C" (even though it is on the correct physical hard drive I wanted it to be on -- "D") and the previous boot drive with the x32 install (which was "C") is now shown in Disk manager and Windows Explorer as the "D" drive.

    I want x32 to always be shown on the "C" drive regardless if I boot into x32 or x64 and I want to x64 to always be shown on the "D" drive regardless if I boot into x64 or x32.

    How can this "role switching" or whatever you want to call it be fixed?

    Thanks.
    Saturday, November 22, 2008 4:58 PM
  • Well I built a machine with the 32 and 64 bit versions in it. I put each in its own hard drive. I think each one calls its drive the c drive when your in it and the other drive the d drive. but I would have to start it and see. I did experimant with xp, vista 32 n 64 all in 1 machine simply to see how it would react. put both of them on 250 gb hard drives. but if you had a 250 and a 500 i think it is a simple as installing what os you want on to the drive you want it on. i do think the boot partction in vista resides on the drive the bios refers to as c, but again I am not sure. since they all use the same ntfs file system you can probabilly use 1 hard drive as storage in the pc and have all of the os's use it. again I am not sure what it is your trying to do.

     

    Saturday, November 22, 2008 5:50 PM