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Home user: Need Win 8 Disk Imaging solution with UEFI-compatible Startup Disks RRS feed

  • Question

  • I use a product to make an  image of drive C  and store that image as a file on my drive D. (Only the OS and apps are on C; all my data is on D). In case of an emergency I boot off the imaging software’s startup disks and stamp down the image stored on D over drive C.  The process works well, that is until I bought a new computer with a UEFI BIOS. Apparently the startup disks do not support UEFI and are totally ignored during the boot process. (Curiously enough, the Win 8 and Win Server 2012 DVDs are UEFI compatible and recognized during the boot process).

    Question: can you recommend another imaging product that generates UEFI-compatible startup disks I can use to boot from?

    TIA,

    edm2

    Tuesday, December 18, 2012 5:29 PM

Answers

  • P.S Regarding the  Windows Backup Imaging solution, I don't like to hang my hopes on something that is already regarded as being legacy and probably deprecated soon.

    Well, while I understand the sentiment, either it works or it doesn't - and you have people telling you it works.

    Plus I don't think there's any guarantee a 3rd party backup solution you choose now will work in Windows 9.

    I'm presently making a Windows Backup system image backup to a brand new 3 TB Western Digital MyBook drive.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    • Marked as answer by edm2 Saturday, January 19, 2013 12:06 AM
    Wednesday, December 26, 2012 8:55 PM

All replies

  • In Windows 8 just go to Control Panel--Windows 7 File Recovery and on the left side click on "create a system image" and make sure you check the boxes for "efi system partition" and "recovery(system)" for UEFI compatible image.  

    Be kind and Mark as Answer if I helped.

    • Proposed as answer by Chris DeCarlo Wednesday, December 19, 2012 2:48 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by Chris DeCarlo Thursday, December 20, 2012 7:30 AM
    • Proposed as answer by padme99 Tuesday, June 4, 2013 3:21 PM
    Tuesday, December 18, 2012 6:21 PM
  • Chris,

    So you are bypassing my (now useless) Imaging software, having Windows 8 generate the image of drive C, and UEFI bootable disks, that I can use stamp down on my drive C in case of emergency. Is that correct?

    emd2

    Tuesday, December 18, 2012 7:32 PM
  • That's what I use Windows System Image backup for.  That's been possible for quite a long time now (since Vista).  I can do (and have done) a bare metal restore with it.

    Since Windows 7 you can schedule it to run every night to an external USB backup drive for example, and it's even incremental - finishing in a few hours usually, depending on how much data you touch each day.

    The ironic thing is that Microsoft is deprecating Windows Backup (which is why they've put it in the enigmatic category of "Windows 7 File Recovery" in the control panel).  Their justification is that very few folks use it ("telemetry shows 6%").  It's especially ironic because it actually works and works well.

    Make a System Repair Disc while you're at it.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Tuesday, December 18, 2012 8:17 PM
  • Like all things in life -- by the time I learn about them they are on the way out!

    edm2

    Tuesday, December 18, 2012 9:23 PM
  • I found that even with a product that generates a UEFI compatible disk I am getting "Secure Boot Violation. Invalid Signature detected...." so it looks like I need to disable, at least temporarily, the Secure boot policy on my machine. (From what I understand, to insure integrity of the bootstrap loader the UEFI standard requires that Certificates be installed in the BIOS and a boot disk (CD\DVD) needs to have a matching signature.    No wonder my Microsoft CD\DVDs passed the bootstrap with flying colors but no other 3rd party DVD would boot.)

    edm2

    Wednesday, December 19, 2012 4:35 AM
  • Just for clarity, are you saying a System Repair Disc you create on that system won't boot without that error?

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Wednesday, December 19, 2012 6:37 PM
  • No, I was trying to boot a "startup disk" generated by my partition imaging solution ("RDrive"). I finally got it working: I disabled secure booting in the UEFI BIOS, enabled "Legacy" boot, then had to specifically disable UEFI boot options (otherwise I was not allowed to boot with a Legacy device.)  I believe in security but the UEFI standard makes life very hard for network Admins and technicians.

    edm2

    Thursday, December 20, 2012 6:04 AM
  • You may refer to:

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/947024


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”

    Thursday, December 20, 2012 7:57 AM
    Moderator
  • I do this using Windows Setup disk.

    1. Download the ImageX tool from the Windows ADK

    2. Copy Windows 8 setup files from the installation media to the USB flash drive

    3. Copy the ImageX tool to your UFD flash drive with Windows 8

    4. Boot from this USB flash and press SHIFT+F10 when booted

    5. Use the following command to image your S: drive (substitute S: with the driver letter of your source partition that you want to image):

    E:\Tools\amd64>imagex.exe /compress fast /check /boot /capture s: d:\image.wim

    "Description of the image you are capturing"

    Where E: is the driver letter of your USB drive with Windows 8 setup files.

    6. Use the following command to apply created image.wim to the target partition on the target disk drive

    E:\Tools\amd64>imagex /apply d:\install.wim 1 t:\

    Here t:\ is your target drive where to you want to apply the captured install.wim image.

    Alternatively, you may use the DISM tool from the same Windows ADK. Here are the corresponding commands.

    Create a drive image using DISM:

    E:\Tools\amd64\DISM>dism /capture-image /imagefile:d:\image.wim /capturedir:s:\ /n
    ame:"Description" /compress:fast /bootable /checkintegrity /verify

    Apply the created WIM image

    E:\Tools\amd64\DISM>dism /apply-image /imagefile:d:\install.wim /applydir:t:\
    /index:1 /checkintegrity /verify

    This worked fine for me booting my UEFI PC and deploying WIM image to a GPT VHD virtual disk on a physical GPT disk drive.


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...


    Thursday, December 20, 2012 3:50 PM
  • Exotic,

    Thank you for the detailed steps. I finally got my "old" disk imaging solution to work but what a "mess". In short I had to enable legacy boot support in my (HP) UEFI BIOS but the steps were tedious.  First, I needed to insert a DVD in my BlueRay disk device or the BlueRay device was not recognized by the BIOS! Then I booted into the UEFI BIOS and found that legacy boot was disabled. So I enabled it -- but was told that I needed to disable Secure Boot first. So i did that. Then I rebooted again and got back into the BIOS. Then I received a message telling me that the Secure boot option was disabled and I needed to enter a code (which changes) and press Enter to accept then. Still I could not boot from the Blue Ray. I found that in the boot order pane I needed to explicitly disable UEFI devices leaving only the legacy ones available for boot. Then I selected "ATAPI CD\DVD" (no BlueRay name seen), rebooted and finally got the system to boot from the DVD. I believe in security but I also believe that UEFI has nearly ruined the capability to boot from a DVD. Finally, to reset the BIOS back to "normal" I found it easier to select the "reset to Default" option. (I then had to enable the Hyper-V virtualization  as I use that).

    In a word, "absurd"

    edm2

    Thursday, December 20, 2012 7:03 PM
  • @edm2

    Uh, pretty confusing! Glad to hear you've resolved the issue and thank you for posting details! But that's quite a standard for device vendors. They tend to install blank BIOS firmware as supplied by BIOS vendor without customizing them and enabling firmware features. Typical example here --- UEFI BIOS firmware in old Acer and Sony notebooks that used blank Isyde H20 BIOS back in 2008.


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...

    Friday, December 21, 2012 10:12 AM
  • I did the same thing, using Active Disk Image, enabled Legacy Boot, but when I restored the image, the EFI partitioning was messed up and would not boot.

    What works 100% of the time, is a System Image created with UEFI Enabled. That will restore with any Win8 DVD, or Recovery Drive you create. If LEGACY BOOT is enabled, the System Image you create cannot be restored, because the the Recovery Environment boot from WIn8 DVD or Recovery Drive, cannot find the EFI partitions.

    So make sure you can restore the image created with your "old" disk imaging software. I doubt it will work.

    I still have not found any commercial product, other than Windows System Image that will restore an EFI GPT drive.

    I have spent about 30 hrs testing all permutation on a Lenovo x230 Win8-64 with UEFI set from the factory, and the only imaging that can restore the machine is System Image with UEFI enabled.

    Friday, December 21, 2012 8:22 PM
  • ** Update **

    I went through the Windows 7 Recovery option. For starters it makes a disk (drive C) image that I could not locate on the destination drive. Hmmmm.  As part of the process I created a system repair disk, booted off it, and was then presented was several options to choose from. I fumbled around a bit before I realized that, while doable, the utility of using an image to restore my system has become a pain in the &^%^%#$!   What's scary is this option, as poor as it may be,  may not even be supported in future edition of Windows. The future of imaging Windows for restoration seems in doubt.*****

    Solr,

    Regarding >>>> I have spent about 30 hrs testing all permutation on a .....

    I feel your pain. In fact I think I experienced the same pain. The computer field has its rewards but it is pretty crazy too.

    Given your warning

    1. I will try Chris's suggestion:  In Windows 8 just go to Control Panel--Windows 7 File Recovery and on the left side click on "create a system image" and make sure you check the boxes for "efi system partition" and "recovery(system)" for UEFI compatible image.  

    >>>> When I go through the steps Chris mentions I see "EFI Partition" , C,  Recovery Image (D) - HP's recovery partition, Windows RE tools (system) but no "recovery(system)". Looks like another learning curve coming up.

    2. And then I will verify the image works!

    edm2


    • Edited by edm2 Saturday, December 22, 2012 8:24 AM update
    Saturday, December 22, 2012 1:07 AM
  • My prior imaging solution (R-Drive) failed to create a bootable DVD I could use. Same story for Acronis True Image. The  problem was always missing drivers (USB xHCI Complaint Host Controller) and sometimes an Invalid signature. Still I needed a solution so I kept looking and found "Macrium reflect" (http://www.macrium.com/). I tried it but it couldn't generate a bootable DVD rescue disk either. It appeared the matter was hopeless.   Well Merry XMAS. Macrium released and update today that, so far, need to test it further, looks good.  Unlike before all drivers on my computer (HP Phoenix Envy h9-1340T) are now recognized by the Rescue DVD creation routine. When I reboot my computer, select my DVD as the boot drive (no "Legacy boot" nonsense required) I boot into their app (under Windows PE 4).  I'll be exploring the new release further this weekend and get back to you but if you are struggling to find a workable imaging solution Macrium is worth exploring. 

    edm2

    P.S. This product can also modify the Windows boot menu to include an option to boot to Window PE.  In other words, you don't need an external device or DVD to boot from anymore. My computer has three drives: C,D,E and a DVD burner.

    Tuesday, December 25, 2012 6:12 PM
  • Out of curiosity, what part of the Windows Backup imaging solution didn't you like (you said you still needed a solution and kept looking)?

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Tuesday, December 25, 2012 9:09 PM
  • Noel,

    "Exotic"'s solution was a bit too involved for me to try so I was looking for a third-party solution. My tried-and-true R-Disk Recovery disk was not recognized in the boot process. The company said I needed to set the "Boot Legacy Device" option in the UEFI BIOS. Simple concept but a pain in the rear to do in practice.  Both Acronis TrueImage  and, initially, Macrium, gave me an "Invalid Signature"  when I forced a boot form the DVD (I think is was an "efi" file invalid signature file) which made them untrustworthy.  To me, creating an image should be an easy a foolproof matter like it was for the last 4 years on my old computer.

    edm2

    P.S Regarding the  Windows Backup Imaging solution, I don't like to hang my hopes on something that is already regarded as being legacy and probably deprecated soon.


    • Edited by edm2 Tuesday, December 25, 2012 10:21 PM
    Tuesday, December 25, 2012 10:20 PM
  • I know, command line tools are confusing but when you got used to them, they are pretty flexible and easy to use. Personally, after nearly years of seeking for a reliable recovery solution I ended up with preparing a Universal Floppy Disk, a USB stick with Windows 8 setup plus a folder with some bits of Windows ADK. That's stable and works on every PC without needing to install anything. These two lines are not hard to remember.

    Just my 2 cents to insist on ADK and stress on how good it is.


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...

    Tuesday, December 25, 2012 10:40 PM
  • Exotic,

    Using  Macrium Reflect I created an image of my drive 0, restored it, and the system seems to be working fine. (I did encounter an issue during restore that the company needs to address:

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>

    Error dialog box

                "Standard SATA AHCI Control.... from Intel Corporation....  No driver has been found for this device...

                Click "Locate" driver.....  Unfortunately I could not find the driver so had to exit Reflect and reboot the

                system without completing the full restore process.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>

    Still, after rebooting, the system seems to work fine and there are no "unknown devices" shown under Device Manager. Odd, very odd.   So I decided to reboot, again, from the DVD but this time it worked without any errors. 

    BTW: you wrote "2. Copy Windows 8 setup files from the installation media to the USB flash drive"

    What director(ies) contains these files? 

    edm2


    • Edited by edm2 Wednesday, December 26, 2012 12:51 AM
    Tuesday, December 25, 2012 11:36 PM
  • P.S Regarding the  Windows Backup Imaging solution, I don't like to hang my hopes on something that is already regarded as being legacy and probably deprecated soon.

    Well, while I understand the sentiment, either it works or it doesn't - and you have people telling you it works.

    Plus I don't think there's any guarantee a 3rd party backup solution you choose now will work in Windows 9.

    I'm presently making a Windows Backup system image backup to a brand new 3 TB Western Digital MyBook drive.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    • Marked as answer by edm2 Saturday, January 19, 2013 12:06 AM
    Wednesday, December 26, 2012 8:55 PM
  • Exotic,

    Using  Macrium Reflect I created an image of my drive 0, restored it, and the system seems to be working fine. (I did encounter an issue during restore that the company needs to address:

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>

    Error dialog box

                "Standard SATA AHCI Control.... from Intel Corporation....  No driver has been found for this device...

                Click "Locate" driver.....  Unfortunately I could not find the driver so had to exit Reflect and reboot the

                system without completing the full restore process.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>

    Still, after rebooting, the system seems to work fine and there are no "unknown devices" shown under Device Manager. Odd, very odd.   So I decided to reboot, again, from the DVD but this time it worked without any errors. 

    BTW: you wrote "2. Copy Windows 8 setup files from the installation media to the USB flash drive"

    What director(ies) contains these files? 

    edm2


    Hi, edm2,

    Sorry to have missed your question. I just meant to copy all an everything from ISO/Setup media to a USB stick just to boot from it into Windows 8 setup.


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...

    Saturday, January 19, 2013 12:19 AM
  • Hi! guys, first time post.

    I followed your instructions and made a backup to an external drive but haven't tested it yet.

    This is the first time I'm actually in a forum asking questions previously (XP, Vista and Win&) Google was enough to get any answers. Window 8 though is another cup of tea.

    First I got a system without system recovery disks. No problem I thought, I'll burn them from the recovery tool on the comp but there was no option to make any recovery tools and nothing about it was said anywhere. Searched online for almost three days before I read somewhere that Refurbished systems had that utility disabled.  I really thought A company as prestigious as Toshiba was beyond such tactics-just so I should buy the disk for $20 from them-I mean do they really loose anything when even the media I'm burning to will not cost them a dime. And besides I should have been warned with a little note with the system I'd been shipped. Shame on you Toshiba.[end of rant]

    Anyway I found this post and tried Chris' instructions and backed up my HDD. I want an out of the box backup in case anything goes wrong, I may be able to get the original factory setup at least.

    Fisrt I'd like to partition the disk into two partitions-another remiss from toshiba-I have just one drive, the system drive. But I'm told that once the partition size changes that system  is unable to recover from recovery partition. Is there a work around this? Also is there a  way to install windows 7 from win8. This is my dad's comp, he's 70 plus and I doubt he'd take to windows 8 so easily.

    How nice it would have been if win 8 recovery partition would update itself to any partition or OS changes-but then that would make life easier for windows users and that's not how MS functions.

    Tuesday, June 4, 2013 3:21 PM
  • Folks -- I finally found a product called reflector from Macrium, http://www.macrium.com/

    that works fine with UEFI disk. (The only trick, I found, was before rebooting my box to use their boot disk, I needed to insert the disk into my DVD drive so it was recognized, then reboot my box. Otherwise the DVD was NOT recognized as a bootable device when that box was rebooted.)

    edm2

     

    Wednesday, June 5, 2013 12:10 AM
  • Hello

    Like you I wanted an easier way around this new UEFI and found it with Macrium Reflect. It is set to establish a compatible interface and does the work for you.

    Within Macrium you need only create the Win PE disc 5.0 for Win 8.1 and 4.0 for Win 8.  Macrium does this for you also. You just follow a couple of prompts.

    Us this disc when you are recovering and there is little else to do.


    • Edited by peter43e4 Wednesday, February 5, 2014 4:09 PM
    Wednesday, February 5, 2014 4:05 PM
  • Soon as DVD makers integrate UEFI bio in their DVD Rom Drives, you will not need tools to do what this topic is covering .
    Thursday, February 6, 2014 2:11 AM
  • You know, after trying to seek for confirmation that using a system image backup and restore if viabale on Win. 8.1 with UEfi and GPD w/secure boot enabled;  this just simply makes sense.  

    Thank you.  And as for the bootable recovery media conundrum, that would enable a user to restore their image incase of a non bootable OS: - A Windows recovery flash drive sounds like the obvious solution. 

    A confused 8.1 User 
    Thursday, June 26, 2014 11:49 PM