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Black Screen with error 0xc00000e9 after reboot

    Question

  •  

    Hi all,

     

    yesterday my computer (running under Vista Ultimate) was running very slow and some services such as Indexing stopped working... so I decided to reboot the computer... but after the BIOS screen, error 0xc00000e9 appeared in a blank screen. I tried several things: start last known good configuration, safe mode... nothing to do!

    Now I'm trying to repair my Windows from the original DVD but the process is very very long... I have a blank screen with the mouse pointer, and my hard drive led show me sometimes an activity...

     

    Can someone help me?

     

    Thanks in advance ;-)

    Friday, September 28, 2007 4:36 PM

Answers

  • I have the same problem with my laptop. It was working fine until I rebooted it a few days ago and it came up with the black screen indicating some kind of file or disk error, which was followed by an automatic error scan of the hard disk. This showed a number of file indexing errors etc., which were automatically fixed during the scan, after which Vista eventually started and functioned as normal.

     

    Then a few days later Windows startup failed and halted at the screen with the 0xc00000e9 error message on it:

     

    I tried the Startup Repair (booting from the installation disk), which seemed to work just fine until the problem returned a few reboots later. I then completely reinstalled Vista, and again everything seemed to work just fine until I rebooted yesterday and got the same error message again.

     

    Running chkdsk /b from the command (cmd) prompt revealed unreadable segments and index files, so I suspect that my hard disk (which is less than 2 years old) may be going bad.

     

    Here's a description of the problem (as I understand it) and possible solutions  in layman's terms:

     

    The Registry

    All the data (information) Windows Vista needs to start up and function properly are stored in a special data file called the System Registry. If the registry file is missing, or corrupt (meaning that something was either changed or added incorrectly), Windows will stop functioning properly, or in this case, to stop loading altogether.

     

    The Cause

    A missing or corrupt registry can have various causes:

    - An accidental writing error by the computer.

      This can just be a glitch, but can also happen if the computer loses power before it has time to shutdown properly.

     

    - The installation of a badly written program.

      This could be a program you installed, or even an automatic update via the internet.

      (Some on the forum believe it may even be a recent Windows Vista update from Microsoft themselves).

     

    - Contamination by a computer virus.

      (This could have been hidden in something that was downloaded from the internet).

     

    - A bad/worn out hard drive.

      (Unfortunately hard drives don't last forever, but if you're lucky it may still be within warrantee).

     

    Possible Solutions

    Performing the following options (in the order they are listed) may help to ‘fix’ the problem.

     

    Option 1:

    1. Restart your computer using an anti-virus recovery boot disk, and perform a complete and thorough scan (including the MBR if you can) of your computer for viruses.
    2. If a virus is discovered then this may very well be the cause of your problem. Unfortunately however, removing the virus may not actually fix the startup problem, because it has already corrupted the registry files.

    Option 2:

    1. Insert the Windows Vista installation disk, and restart the computer. This should automatically start the installation program, but you may need to press Enter during startup to confirm you want to boot from the installation disk.
    2. Select your Language etc, and click on Next.
    3. Near the bottom of the screen click on Repair your computer.
    4. Select the operating system (if it isn't already selected), and click on Next.
    5. Select Startup Repair and follow any instruction on the screen. Eventually you will need to restart the computer (don't forget to remove the installation disk first).
    6. If the Startup Repair doesn't solve the problem, repeat all the step above and select System Restore, and follow the on-screen instructions. (This option will only be of use if a System Restore point was previously created while the computer was still functioning correctly).
    7. If the System Restore option indicates that the disk has errors, click on the Check the disk for errors option. Note that this may possibly indicate that your hard disk may be getting bad and needs replacement, especially if similar problems are starting to occur more often.

    Option 3:

    Try this option if you have previously made a backup of your entire computer.

    1. Repeat steps 1-4 of Option 2
    2. Select Windows Complete PC Restore and follow the on-screen instructions.

    Option 4:

    Completely reinstall Windows Vista from scratch. Unfortunately this will mean losing all the files currently on your hard disk, but hopefully you're one of those wise people who have regularly created backups of their important files onto CD/DVD.

    1. Repeat steps 1-3 of Option 2
    2. Select Install, and follow the on-screen instructions.
    3. Don't install any additional programs or allow any (automatic) updates to be downloaded and installed yet.
    4. If after a few reboots the computer appears to be working fine, create a System Restore Point as follows:
      • Click Start > Control Panel > System and Maintenance > System Protection > System Protection tab > Create
    5. If the problem re-occurs before installing any other programs or updates then you probably have a bad hard disk, which will need replacing.
    6. Download any updates for Windows Vista and then reboot your computer a few times.
    7. If the problem re-occurs after downloading and installing updates, then probably one of the updates is corrupt. In this case repeat steps 1-4 and then 6 of Option 2, to restore your system to the Restore Point you created in step 4, and then don't allow any Windows updates until Microsoft has come up with a fix.
    8. If the problem does not re-occur, then you can start installing other programs. 

     

    Good luck

     

    Monday, April 07, 2008 12:23 PM

All replies

  •  

    I have the exact same problem. All I did in my previous login before the error was run Vista Disk Cleanup. I was not using any external I/O and did not install any new software during that login. Then I attempted to shutdown the machine and the shutdown failed. I had to hard power off the machine and upon restart I get this error every time. I think it is related to a registry error and I have yet to be able to fix it.
    Saturday, December 01, 2007 3:08 AM
  • This is, in fact, a registry error.  Typically, using a Windows repair disk may help.  However, I have run the diagnostic on my system several times, to no avail.  This error usually indicates a catastrophic failure of the registry, and it also means you'll have to reinstall Windows Vista.  The best thing is to make sure to back up your data on a regular basis, so when events of this nature do happen, they can be overcome with little or no data loss.

    Of course, your data are still on the hard drive, so if you plug the drive into another computer that has a functioning O/S, you can transfer files that are most critical to you, then place the hard drive back into your host system and reinstall Windows.  It is time consuming, but it does work.

    Good luck!
    Saturday, January 12, 2008 1:20 PM
  •  

    I had this same problem also.  This first occured around Christmas 2007.  I have left my laptop in its case until today (2-16-08) when I decided to fix it.  I have a Dell Precision M4300 laptop with 2GB of RAM, 80GB SATA hard drive, Intel Core2 Duo processor, and Windows Vista Ultimate Edition.  Since my wife uses it, I figured she must have downloaded something that my anti-virus could not detect.  I pulled the drive out and hooked it up to my destop computer via a SATA to USB adapter.  I transfered all my data to the desktop and then ran a disk check scan on the drive.  Nothing came back as being bad.  This led me to believe that it must have been either a fluke or a nasty program she had downloaded.

     

    I did what most people end up doing, formating the hard drive and performing the clean install.  Vista installed great, antivirus installed, Office 2007 Pro installed, transfer of data back to my laptop via ethernet installed, and all previous drivers installed with no problem.  Even with all the multiple reboots to complete installation, the operating system came right back up.

     

    Here is what went wrong!  After spending nearly a whole day getting my laptop back the way it was, I decided to run Windows Update.  After installing all, I believe 78 updates, the computer rebooted again to make those updates active.  As soon as the BIOS was done booting and it was time for Windows to boot, I got the nasty "WINDOWS BOOT MANAGER" error.  The first sentance states:

     

    "Windows failed to start.  A recent hardware or software change might be the cause.  To fix the problem:

    1. Insert your Windows installation disc and restart your computer.

    2. Choose your language settings, and click "Next."

    3. Click "Repair your computer."

     

    If you do not have this disc, contact your system administrator or computer manufacturer for assistance.

    File: \Windows\system32\config\system

    status: 0xc00000e9

    Info:  Windows failed to load because the system registry file is missing, or corrupt."

     

    Of course I followed all the directions and it still comes back to this screen with the same error.  I personally believe this error is due to one of the hotfix's or patch's that Windows Update installed.  There must have been a hotfix some time around the week of 12-17-08 that caused this error or corruption in the registry.  After looking online, it looks like any time you have a corrupt registry, you end up having to do a clean install of Windows.  So, I guess I wasted my day trying to fix this laptop.  I will continue my search for updates and try to narrow down which one causes this total system failure.  Hopefully this gives someone out there some insight into fixing this or at least pulling the hotfix that is resposible for the error.

    Sunday, February 17, 2008 4:37 AM
  • Thanks to all for your posts!

    I did not found any quick answer to this problem. First I thought it was a hard drive failure, so I bought a brand new one in order to replace it (and not to loose any data by formatting the old one).

    After the re-installation of Vista, I tried to find by sectors or any other mistake on the HDD, but nothing! I made a backup of all necessary files and re-format it. It is now back alive without any problem.

     

    So finally, I suspect as many of you said that the problem came from a corrupted registry (or something similar) after a shutdown...

     

    Thanks again to everybody, and sorry to have not found a repair solution, except the format!

     

    Sunday, February 17, 2008 12:12 PM
  • None of the stuff on this page makes any sence to me as i no little bout computers or computer jsrgon...can someone please tell me in SIMPLE terms how to sort my PC out whan it displays the error 0xc00000e9 message...my windows vista recovery disk does NOT work. it is the ONLY disk i have all emails are welcome, as i am using a friends computer as i can NOT get on to mine. colinjenkinson@hotmail.co.uk allso add me on MSN if it will help explain things more clear.

     

    Thank You.

    Sunday, April 06, 2008 8:25 PM
  • I have the same problem with my laptop. It was working fine until I rebooted it a few days ago and it came up with the black screen indicating some kind of file or disk error, which was followed by an automatic error scan of the hard disk. This showed a number of file indexing errors etc., which were automatically fixed during the scan, after which Vista eventually started and functioned as normal.

     

    Then a few days later Windows startup failed and halted at the screen with the 0xc00000e9 error message on it:

     

    I tried the Startup Repair (booting from the installation disk), which seemed to work just fine until the problem returned a few reboots later. I then completely reinstalled Vista, and again everything seemed to work just fine until I rebooted yesterday and got the same error message again.

     

    Running chkdsk /b from the command (cmd) prompt revealed unreadable segments and index files, so I suspect that my hard disk (which is less than 2 years old) may be going bad.

     

    Here's a description of the problem (as I understand it) and possible solutions  in layman's terms:

     

    The Registry

    All the data (information) Windows Vista needs to start up and function properly are stored in a special data file called the System Registry. If the registry file is missing, or corrupt (meaning that something was either changed or added incorrectly), Windows will stop functioning properly, or in this case, to stop loading altogether.

     

    The Cause

    A missing or corrupt registry can have various causes:

    - An accidental writing error by the computer.

      This can just be a glitch, but can also happen if the computer loses power before it has time to shutdown properly.

     

    - The installation of a badly written program.

      This could be a program you installed, or even an automatic update via the internet.

      (Some on the forum believe it may even be a recent Windows Vista update from Microsoft themselves).

     

    - Contamination by a computer virus.

      (This could have been hidden in something that was downloaded from the internet).

     

    - A bad/worn out hard drive.

      (Unfortunately hard drives don't last forever, but if you're lucky it may still be within warrantee).

     

    Possible Solutions

    Performing the following options (in the order they are listed) may help to ‘fix’ the problem.

     

    Option 1:

    1. Restart your computer using an anti-virus recovery boot disk, and perform a complete and thorough scan (including the MBR if you can) of your computer for viruses.
    2. If a virus is discovered then this may very well be the cause of your problem. Unfortunately however, removing the virus may not actually fix the startup problem, because it has already corrupted the registry files.

    Option 2:

    1. Insert the Windows Vista installation disk, and restart the computer. This should automatically start the installation program, but you may need to press Enter during startup to confirm you want to boot from the installation disk.
    2. Select your Language etc, and click on Next.
    3. Near the bottom of the screen click on Repair your computer.
    4. Select the operating system (if it isn't already selected), and click on Next.
    5. Select Startup Repair and follow any instruction on the screen. Eventually you will need to restart the computer (don't forget to remove the installation disk first).
    6. If the Startup Repair doesn't solve the problem, repeat all the step above and select System Restore, and follow the on-screen instructions. (This option will only be of use if a System Restore point was previously created while the computer was still functioning correctly).
    7. If the System Restore option indicates that the disk has errors, click on the Check the disk for errors option. Note that this may possibly indicate that your hard disk may be getting bad and needs replacement, especially if similar problems are starting to occur more often.

    Option 3:

    Try this option if you have previously made a backup of your entire computer.

    1. Repeat steps 1-4 of Option 2
    2. Select Windows Complete PC Restore and follow the on-screen instructions.

    Option 4:

    Completely reinstall Windows Vista from scratch. Unfortunately this will mean losing all the files currently on your hard disk, but hopefully you're one of those wise people who have regularly created backups of their important files onto CD/DVD.

    1. Repeat steps 1-3 of Option 2
    2. Select Install, and follow the on-screen instructions.
    3. Don't install any additional programs or allow any (automatic) updates to be downloaded and installed yet.
    4. If after a few reboots the computer appears to be working fine, create a System Restore Point as follows:
      • Click Start > Control Panel > System and Maintenance > System Protection > System Protection tab > Create
    5. If the problem re-occurs before installing any other programs or updates then you probably have a bad hard disk, which will need replacing.
    6. Download any updates for Windows Vista and then reboot your computer a few times.
    7. If the problem re-occurs after downloading and installing updates, then probably one of the updates is corrupt. In this case repeat steps 1-4 and then 6 of Option 2, to restore your system to the Restore Point you created in step 4, and then don't allow any Windows updates until Microsoft has come up with a fix.
    8. If the problem does not re-occur, then you can start installing other programs. 

     

    Good luck

     

    Monday, April 07, 2008 12:23 PM
  • I KNow what to do...... i had the same thing happen today.....but sadly before i knew what to do i deleated a bunch of files....but anyway   get task manger up.. then go to new task and type explorer...and then it shoud load. hoped i helped. 

    Wednesday, June 11, 2008 5:18 AM
  • where can I get task manager and how do I use it?

    Saturday, July 26, 2008 11:32 PM
  • I'm having same issue the last couple of months.  I do have a new hard drive so that isn't the issue.  It is something in the registry, but what is causing it and how do I fix it?  I am getting tired of putting in the Vista disk and repairing computer to get it to boot up. 

    I am no techno whiz, but do want to avoid having one at a grand charge to come work on this.  Since this is obviously not a new issue surely there is somebody who knows what to do. 

     

    Thursday, July 31, 2008 8:40 PM
  • I have also just encountered this same problem.
    It seems to have occurred following a Windows update (from 2008-11-14)

    I tried auto repair using the Vista disk to no avail...
    I then tried System Restore using the install disk trying 2 different restore points ... again no luck.

    My Solution:
    It then occurred to me that I had previously made 1 registry hack to allow AHCI disk access (and then changed BIOS mode to AHCI)... (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976)
    So I booted into BIOS and reset my SATA mode to SATA instead of AHCI (this option is called IDE on some motherboards).

    Now Vista boots fine.

    Interestingly, the registry hack is still there.

    It is worth considering that your PC vendor may have made this registry modification before you received yuor computer, and thus I would recommend trying the BIOS change even if you didn't make the registry hack yourself.
    Sunday, November 16, 2008 11:41 AM
  • did you get help with this - I have the same probem and no one seems to know how to help apart from buying new laptop!! I cant do that

     

    Linda

    Monday, April 05, 2010 6:48 PM
  • I have a very similar problem with my HP Pavilion laptop. I got around it by starting in safe mode and uninstalling the display adapter. I'm using the default vga adapter. Its more stable now.
    Thursday, April 08, 2010 2:31 AM
  • my hhp dv7 just did this same thing also 2 days after the warranty expired!  i tried the factory image recovery or the clean repair and after it all loaded the windows blue screen comes on and the little in progress circle turns for 5 minutes then it shuts off or looses power like someone pulled out the plug, no shut down. what do i need a new hard drive?
    Tuesday, May 11, 2010 2:29 AM
  • First of all I can safely eliminate a malware source for my problem here (Windows Boot Manager … Status: 0xc00000e9 Info I/O error… because I was only re-re-re-re-re-re-re-reinstalling Windows 7 after faults itself produced and not initially started by Hard Ware faults…

    Running the Startup Repair from the install DVD reports the following:

    Problem Event Name: StartupRepairOffline
    Problem Signature 01: 6.1.7600.16385
    Problem Signature 02: 6.1.7600.16385
    Problem Signature 03: unknown
    Problem Signature 04: -1
    Problem Signature 05: AutoFailover
    Problem Signature 06: 3
    Problem Signature 07: CorruptRegistry
    OS Version: 6.1.7601.2.1.0.256.1
    LocaleID: 1033

    What I believe this to mean is the HardDisk is failing - not bad sectors failing, more like power cutting off failing.

    Now I didn't build this thing - I've already had one bad experience with home-building something-that-spends-more-time-opened-up-waiting-for-replacement-than-it-actually-is-ever-fit-for-use. It's not fair, it's a drain on my time, constantly asking me to spend more and more and more to repair problems not caused by misuse, accident or wear/tear. It is like the cells in a human body - replace themselves completely over 7 years except in this case is it 7months after which nothing remains of the original set up apart from the original case+keyboard+mouse+monitor: Harddisk fail followed by RAM fail followed by GFX fail followed by CPU fail followed by mainboard fail followed by PSU fail and then back to the new hard drive fail………

    Solution: sell this POC to some poor mug on eBay and Buy A Mac instead
    Saturday, October 22, 2011 8:42 PM
  • Your problem description is accurate. You sollution however, is pure nonsense. Mac runs just the same Intel x64 chips, with Xeon CPU's, like our normal servers have. I've installed Windows just fine on any Mac - there is nothing special or Unique about Mac but only it's pricing and own OS tuned for specific tasks. Userabuse (cutting power while running) could cause the error - even on Mac.

    Microsoft can not be held responsible for what a user misuses. If you want powerfail protection, you're more likely to succeed when treating your system with respect, not turning it off over nothing without cleanly saving state and shutting down. And in addition you could add a UPS when your supply from the energygrid is unstable / critical to work.

    Friday, June 29, 2012 4:00 PM