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UAC Shield icon overlay will not go away!

    General discussion

  • The blue/yellow shield won't disappear off some application icons. I'm not running it on admin, nor have I turned on UAC's the would enable it. Help please?
    Saturday, January 24, 2009 3:37 PM

All replies

  • http://img91.imageshack.us/img91/6817/capturegm4.png

     

    Picture of what I'm talking about if it helps.
    Saturday, January 24, 2009 3:39 PM
  • Right mouse click on the shortcut.  Click on the application compatibility tab.  What (if anything) is checked in there?  If there is, uncheck it.
    Saturday, January 24, 2009 9:51 PM
    Answerer
  • You won't be able to remove it. It's there as a warning. Your only fix is to remove Win7. Disabling UAC does not remove the requirement to elevate for effective use. It simply disables the nag screen, and makes it twice as hard to use admin rights.
    Rating posts helps other users
    Mark L. Ferguson MS-MVP
    Tuesday, February 03, 2009 2:43 AM
    Moderator
  • I had the same need but couldn't find solution, so I did it myself.

    Modify imageres.dll.
    Just clear UAC icon, make it transparent (and Shortcut overlay at one shot).
    A side effect is that admin icon is missing in context menu, where  "Run as Administrator" command is. Personally I can live with it!
    Friday, June 12, 2009 7:20 AM
  • The blue/yellow shield won't disappear off some application icons. I'm not running it on admin, nor have I turned on UAC's the would enable it. Help please?

    I had the same problem with Total Commander. In my case simply changing the icon to something else helped. Then you just change back to the original icon and that's it.

    Note: If you have the icon pinned to the start menu or taskbar, you won't be able to see the icon changed immediately. It seems that Windows caches the pinned icons and you can't just refresh them, you need to unpin and pin again (or log off and back in) to see the change.
    Tuesday, September 08, 2009 12:02 AM
  • while some ppl is worried about security (only me lol) others just want to leave it wide open like XP!
    Useless post but fair comment...
    RR
    Tuesday, September 08, 2009 1:44 AM
  • while some ppl is worried about security (only me lol) others just want to leave it wide open like XP!
    You are not alone, believe me. Many people, myself included, care about security and appreciate UAC. Those who get annoyed by the nag screens should stop whining and start thinking about how to manage their applications and files so that UAC stops bugging them all the time. I was able to get the most of my software to do its job without elevated privileges by simply modifying the permissions. As for the rest, they are really too small in number to complain.

    But people can't live without complaining, can they?
    Tuesday, September 08, 2009 3:16 AM
  • while some ppl is worried about security (only me lol) others just want to leave it wide open like XP!
    You are not alone, believe me. Many people, myself included, care about security and appreciate UAC. Those who get annoyed by the nag screens should stop whining and start thinking about how to manage their applications and files so that UAC stops bugging them all the time. I was able to get the most of my software to do its job without elevated privileges by simply modifying the permissions. As for the rest, they are really too small in number to complain.

    But people can't live without complaining, can they?
    *sigh* Constant annoyances are STILL ANNOYANCES. If you don't want to deal with the annoyances due to security,find a work-around, use a different os like *nix, or buy a mac and use thier software.

    While i do believe in security, i find most times that MS usually is late to the ball game. UAC while it's intentions are good, implementation leaves a lot to be desired. If you have a suspect application, flag it and stop it from continuing it's processes.  MS's idea is to flag the application and halt all use of the OS until the user deals with the situation. A tad overboard if you ask me.

    Calling people whingers and such solves no issue at all. Stating that they have no worries about security doesn't either. Truth be told, microsoft doesn't exactly have the best track record for security if you ask me, but i still use thier products because there are other solutions available.

    My advice is this:

    If you use MS and have a problem, feel free to ask around for solutions.
    If you use MS and can't stand people asking for help, simply don't respond / read the posts.
    If you don't want to deal with MS, then simply don't.

    It's beginning to get old all these MS huggers fighting the *Nix guys, and the Mac guys, and vice verse, and the normal everyday user gets caught in the crossfire, usually when asking a simple question or trying to find a solution. If you're going to help people help them, if not, and you just want to express your opinion on how THEY should run THEIR pc's, STFU already. It's not your place.

    Next time you get the idea to post in a thread telling people how they should operate their computers, think on how you would feel if someone decided to make all of your decisions for you.

    Wednesday, October 14, 2009 2:37 AM
  • Point taken, ArcAiN6. My previous post might have sounded like I'm a blind Microsoft admirer, but that's far from reality. Yes, I think UAC is good, but it doesn't change the fact that the permissions system is ridiculously overcomplicated. Setting permissions quickly becomes a royal pain in the buttocks, when there are lots of files from the previous installations, nested in sub-folders. Even if you change the ownership of the entire tree, there will always be some "disobedient" files scattered here and there, that for some reason refuse to inherit permissions automatically, having you to do it manually in each case.

    While most of the things in Windows 7 are streamlined, the permissions system remains to be cumbersome. Microsoft surely has a lot of work to do in this particular area.
    Wednesday, October 21, 2009 8:52 AM
  • That worked perfect - thanks!
    Wednesday, June 02, 2010 3:14 AM
  • I've dealt with security settings in both a business setting and my own personal network for many years and still get confused from time to time. UAC is a great step forward from where things were. I strongly agree with those who feel some of the settings are far too complicated, unfortunately the only way to fix the issues would be to start back at square one, and in that case forget backwards compatibility with older systems like xp. I think the main topic of this thread got lost however. The issue here isn't about complaining for the sake of complaining. A user just has some icons that are being covered by another icon. This bothers me too. I have no problem with the warning that comes up when I try to run certain programs, (Microsoft is just trying to help us out a little) but like others, my problem is with the fact that I cant remove the overlay icon. It won't kill us, but it's the little things that make products so great. 

     

     

    Monday, December 27, 2010 3:21 AM
  • Hey, I found an easy solution that worked.

    Right click the program then click properties.Then click the Compatibility tab at the top.The at the bottom

    you will see Privilege Level and under that it will have a checkbox that says Run this program as an admin.

    uncheck that (note that if it is grayed out click the Change settings for all users button on the bottom).

    This you just change the icon to something random...then back to the original icon. THEN everything is back

    to normal.

    PS: To those who dont know how to change the icon:

    Right click the program click properties then click the Shortcut tab....at the bottom of this it will say Change Icon

    The rest is self explanitory.

    Friday, January 28, 2011 8:45 AM
  • Yeah done that but where do you find the original itunes icon after you have changed it???!

    Wednesday, February 08, 2012 4:39 PM
  • I had a program that ran very sluggish. Thanks to this thread I was able to remove UAC and the program now works great but still had the stupid shield. I deleated the shortcut and created a new one from the list of programs and now no more stupid shield and the program work well.
    Sunday, February 19, 2012 6:08 PM
  • I know this is late... I myself am attempting to remove this overlay icon from my apps and games.  I believe you are completely wrong in making your statement... people like me pay hard earned money for our pc's, windows, our programs, and then for protection via whatever means. We don't pay for these "protections" to be tossed at us in our face the way UAC does.  I like having a clean and beautiful pc including my desktop.  So this UAC is in fact annoying to persons like us.  Persons like you like to settle for.... whatever... that doesn't mean others have to.  It's not complaining... it's pointing our flaws.... like your comment.  =]

    Good day.

    Monday, July 29, 2013 1:19 AM
  • nice. =]
    Monday, July 29, 2013 1:21 AM
  • Some of us are plenty smart enough but are just sick and tired of these useless functions. UAC is not necessary to facilitate system security unless you have young kids at home whom play with the computer too, but even then, that won't prevent them from accessing anything if they are entitled to administrator privileges through a guest account nor if the administrator did not create a password or allows every user administrator privileges.

    Either way, for those of us whom just would rather not see a clunky-looking stupid security shield overlay on their program icons, it should only make sense that Windows would have that option built in.

    UAC is virtually useless as a means for hardening system security, unless you have set a password.

    Good computing practices along with a layered approach by using additional anti-malware components as well as maintaining an up to date security suite is a far more concerted approach to preventing any sort of attack.

    Windows Users should also know what they are doing before they configure their security applications and should definitely employ the latest version of EMET from Microsoft or even better than that---Hitman Pro Alert. If you can understand concepts such as ASLR and HEAP Spray protection among many others, then you'll already know how to harden system security so that any attack-vector is greatly reduced if not eliminated. Again, the point here is that users should know what they are doing first.

    Malwarebytes AntiMalware and Zemana Antilogger are also excellent supplemental security programs that all Window users should consider employing in addition to the methods mentioned above. Additionally users should consider using better browsers and be very careful with how much personal information about themselves they actually post online.

    Firefox, Cyberfox and Comodo Ice Dragon are all highly secure and fast browsers and should be a part of everyone's cyber-security vocabulary.

    Don't click on anything suspicious in your emails and don't visit porn sites! They are riddled with all kinds of malware. 

    And don't forget about your router's firewall. This is another point of configuration that can be hardened to prevent attack. 

    At best UAC is a misnomer, at its worst, its a waste of time and a detestable appendage to those of us whom appreciate a smooth and secure desktop experience with our pc's.

    Resetting the icon cache by deleting the IconCache.db file located under your local profile folder (%LOCALAPPDATA%) should do the trick.

    Kill the Explorer.exe process by clicking on Start button > Hold down Ctrl+Shift & Right Click on empty area in the Start Menu > Click "Exit Explorer".

    Click Ctrl+Shift+Esc keys and open Task Manager.
    Click File > New Task > then type [cmd.exe] and click OK. This will open the command prompt.

    Type del /AH "%localappdata%\iconcache.db"
    Press [ENTER]
    Type explorer.exe
    Press [ENTER]

    • Edited by zeroneday Thursday, April 28, 2016 4:08 PM Fixed some spacing issues.
    Wednesday, July 15, 2015 5:39 AM
  • In response to Mark L. Ferguson's statement: "You won't be able to remove it. It's there as a warning. Your only fix is to remove Win7..."

    That is completely bogus information and you should know better than that!

    When people post these types of questions to forums---they're not looking for some sort of fascist answer because Microsoft wants to keep their user-base in line with their skewed vision---they're looking for real answers!

    STOP perpetuating the corporate quelling of the common people and start listening to us!

    The fact of the matter is there are a number of ways to remove the shield overlay from icons, including a well known program called Microangelo.

    You can use Script Power Tools to remove individual shield overlays, though this option would be time-consuming.

    You can use a resource editor to remove common words from the 'Comments' and 'File Description' fields by first loading the program .exe file into the editor. Check the version strings and look for words that could be interpreted as having the potential to change the system, i.e., tweak, recovery, update, setup, install, etc. If Vista sees any of these words, it will put the overlay on the icon. Simply edit these words out of the Version table in the resources.

    You can also use the Command Prompt to remove the shield overlays from icons and start menu items by following these steps:

    1. Make sure UAC (User Account Control) is disabled by moving its slider to the lowest position.
    2. Open the Command Prompt as Administrator.
    3. Type the following commands, pressing [ Enter ] after each line:

        taskkill /IM explorer.exe /F

        CD /d %userprofile%\AppData\Local

        DEL IconCache.db /a

    Then simply restart your computer.

    Please folks, don't listen to liars. All they're interested in is keeping the average user from tweaking their system because Microsoft would rather have full control over you and your machine. It's no longer a (P)ersonal (C)omputer when they've taken that aspect out of the equation.

    You have the right to tweak your system how you please (though you should be smart about it and not forsake system security just to make a few modifications), there are many ways to do this.

    Microsoft is the Evil Empire and if you are with the resistance---they hate that. Too bad I say---too bad!




    • Edited by zeroneday Thursday, April 28, 2016 3:57 PM Minor grammatical error.
    Thursday, April 28, 2016 3:46 PM