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Windows 7 will not connect to xp pc - fails with cannot access \\computer name

    Question

  • I can connect happliy from my windows xp pc to win 7 butnot the other way round - it fails with cannot connect access \\computername. The windows 7 network map shows it has seen it but states that it cannot be placed in the map. I have diabled IPV6 but still no go. Both machines are in a homegroup.

    Anyone got any ideas?
    Thursday, January 14, 2010 2:11 PM

Answers

  • Hi MSayre,

    Since your issue is not related to the current one, please create a new thread in our Networking forum and discuss there.

    Windows 7 Networking 


    Arthur Xie - MSFT
    • Marked as answer by zipe5226 Thursday, January 21, 2010 8:51 PM
    Tuesday, January 19, 2010 9:12 AM
    Moderator
  • Guys .. This solved.

    How to get XP to talk to windows 7 and share  . .  The actions that MS forgot to tell us all .. Sorry but I do not normally complain about MS as I work closeley with them on other developments but this one has really got me - three weeks to resolve and a lot of digging - MS really want to look at their redundancy testing as it is flawed!!

    This Fix is for XP home but maybe of use for the other variations.

    Ok .. If you are not comfortable in editing the registry then get someone who is as you will need to do so.

    Note: disable or remove any anti-virus/firewall software that you may have installed on both PC's (I use PC's to mean laptops, netbooks etc in the generic)  as these inherit settings from the windows firewall upon installation and we need to setup the windows firewall correctly first as follows:-

    1) Download the hotfix from KB 922120 and install. Once installed reboot - into SAFE Mode as we will now be working in that mode for a while.

    2) Check network properties is showing the the Toplology Discovery Responder and Internet Protocol. If they are not checked then do so and reboot back into SAFE mode.

    3) You will now need to edit the registry (Regedit) setting under currentcontrolset lsa and check that the anyomous settings (there maybe 2 of these) are set to 0. If not,  open the dword and set them to 0.

    4) Now check your IPstack settings and set that to 15 if it isn't already set. This will avoid any 'Server Storage Errors' occuring when you later try to access your shares.

    4) Select and share the folders and devices that you wish to share and ensure that you not only give 'Everyone' access but also the avanced settings are configured the same from the properties tab.

    5) Ensure that windows firewall is on.

    6) Reboot normally

    7) Check your network map in windows 7 - it should be showing all your shares including any network printers.

    8) Try to access your shared folders - It should work with no problems.

    9) Success .. Then reinstall your anti-virus/firewall systems and recheck your access after rebooting both pc's, if not, recheck the above in SAFE MODE as it will only work in this mode.

    10) Want to network your printers through the windows 7 PC then follow this:-

    goto:-

    http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-7/share-files-and-printers-between-windows-7-and-xp/

    scroll right down to you see the reply from 'Backdust45' dec 2nd 2009 5:05

    follow the instructions except for step 6.

    As this point tell windows 7 to refresh it's printer driver list and once cpompleted then select your networked printer.

    Windows 7 will then load the correct drivers an donce completed just follow the on screen instructions. It should lead you to a request for a test print .. Say yes .. and you should be connected.

    Hope that this helps everyone struggling with this and maybe MS may put a KB up showing how to network XP & Windows 7.

    • Marked as answer by zipe5226 Thursday, January 21, 2010 8:51 PM
    Thursday, January 21, 2010 8:51 PM

All replies

  • XP cannot join a Homegroup plus you need IPv6 for Homegroups to work. Go to the Network and Sharing Center. On the left click on "Change advanced sharing settings". Expand "Home or Work". Scroll down to "Homegroup connections". Make sure it's set to "Use user accounts and passwords to connect to other computers". Make sure you have an account with the same user name and password on both computers.

    I would turn IPv6 back on. Depending on how you disabled it disabling it may be causing more problems.


    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Thursday, January 14, 2010 3:24 PM
  • zip, if you want to have a step by step (but do enable on IPv6) on how to network windows 7/vista/xp with printer sharing, this will be a good graphical link for you on the how to http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-7/share-files-and-printers-between-windows-7-and-xp/  It will make what Kerry is telling you a little easier to understand. Does your XP machine have SP3 installed? Does the LLTD responder show in your network adapter properties?
    MCSE, MCSA, MCDST [If this post helps to resolve your issue, please click the "Mark as Answer" or "Helpful" button at the top of this message. By marking a post as Answered, or Helpful you help others find the answer faster.]
    Thursday, January 14, 2010 4:34 PM
  • Thanks guys for your thoughts but I have dug a bit deeper:- 1) managed to get network and all pc's to show correctly under the network map on windows 7 starter edition, I have had Symantec to check out config on both machines and prove that it is not nortons that is causing the problem, we have also disabled it and still the problem exists, I have also applied the hotfix to SP3 for the LLTD responder and all is now ok, but we did notice the following:- when you setup networking from XP it iniates the windows firewall and defaults to IPV4 rather than ipv6 (windows 7 map shows IP address for win7 pc in both IPV6 & IPV4 whilst XP is only IPV4 despite the responder code being IPV6. Unless someone can point me at a viable solution my conclusion and that of symantec is that WIN 7 will not allow a reverse connection to an XP PC on a network. I have even tried a full share on the computer (XP) to no avail. Hs anyone actually managed a reverse share using WIN 7?.

    It's beyond me other than I beleiev that MS need to sort out this networking issue as it obviously is affecting a lot of people judging by the amount of forum threads .. But if anyone has an anser I'm willing to try it as I have spent most this week trying to resolve the problem. 
    Thursday, January 14, 2010 8:24 PM
  • I share folders back and force between Windows 7, Vista, and XP all the time. I have no idea what you mean by reverse share. A share is a share. If you share a folder and the computer is properly setup for sharing then all computers on the network should see the share. Disabling the firewall in Norton products doesn't actually disable it. To test if Norton is the problem you have to uninstall it. As long as all the computers have the local subnet in the trusted networks section of Norton it's unlikely Norton is the cause. If you follow the directions in the link that cdobbs posted and you have matching accounts on both computers and it still doesn't work then try uninstalling Norton on both computers. The tech support person from Norton was full of ____.

    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Thursday, January 14, 2010 9:01 PM
  • Yes as stated above and MANY TIMES in the forum sharing works fine, both ways.
    Win 7 is not hard to network, stop reading all the trash people who can network and posting, that is giving people tunnel vision,
     it works and as computers only know 0 or 1, they do not play games, they not "work only for some", if you can not share and
    you think you did everything right, you need to start over. it does work

    I have networks with...
    2000 to win 7 ...win 7 to 2000
    win 7 to xp...xp to win 7
    vista to win 7....win 7 to vista
    win7 to linux...linux to win 7 
    Thursday, January 14, 2010 9:52 PM
  • As Bubba and Kerry have stated, Windows 7 and XP share files just fine, in any direction.  Yes, I can share folders on Win 7 and see them from XP and vice versa.  I do it every day, all the time.

    You don't need HomeGroup networking at all to do this.

    Chances are some 3rd party software you are running is causing your problems, or at the very least you have not configured things correctly.  Do you really think Symantec would tell you that it is their software causing problems, even if it is?

    Let me ask a question:  Do you an account on both computers with the same Username and Password, and are you using that account when trying to access the other computer?  Having that set up will help a lot for starters.

    -Noel
    Friday, January 15, 2010 12:01 AM
  • Thanks guys for your thoughts but I have dug a bit deeper:- 1) managed to get network and all pc's to show correctly under the network map on windows 7 starter edition, I have had Symantec to check out config on both machines and prove that it is not nortons that is causing the problem, we have also disabled it and still the problem exists, I have also applied the hotfix to SP3 for the LLTD responder and all is now ok, but we did notice the following:- when you setup networking from XP it iniates the windows firewall and defaults to IPV4 rather than ipv6 (windows 7 map shows IP address for win7 pc in both IPV6 & IPV4 whilst XP is only IPV4 despite the responder code being IPV6. Unless someone can point me at a viable solution my conclusion and that of symantec is that WIN 7 will not allow a reverse connection to an XP PC on a network. I have even tried a full share on the computer (XP) to no avail. Hs anyone actually managed a reverse share using WIN 7?.

    It's beyond me other than I beleiev that MS need to sort out this networking issue as it obviously is affecting a lot of people judging by the amount of forum threads .. But if anyone has an anser I'm willing to try it as I have spent most this week trying to resolve the problem. 

    Maybe because the LLTD responder for Windows XP only supports reporting of IPv4 addresses, but not IPv6. Windows Vista and Windows 7 build a network browse list with Network Discovery which supports both IPv4 and IPv6.
    Arthur Xie - MSFT
    Monday, January 18, 2010 8:14 AM
    Moderator
  • There is a problem with Win 7, perhaps just on the x64 version, with name resolution on a local network. The problem is not affecting every user and, at least in my case, it is intermittent. For a good description, see this thread: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en/w7itpronetworking/thread/3854e5a9-6cea-4fd5-8736-d0c35373ddf5.

    I found for example that I can connect to a printer on my home XP SP3 machine from my Win 7 x64 machine when Win 7 x64 is first installed. However, once I connect to a different network when traveling with the Win 7 x64 laptop, I can no longer connect to that same printer upon returning home, even after rebooting the Win 7 laptop. The XP machine shows on the network map, but attempts to connect to it result in the same error as described in the beginning of this thread. Reinstalling Win 7 resolves the problem, but only until the next time I travel.

    Monday, January 18, 2010 3:42 PM
  • Hi MSayre,

    Since your issue is not related to the current one, please create a new thread in our Networking forum and discuss there.

    Windows 7 Networking 


    Arthur Xie - MSFT
    • Marked as answer by zipe5226 Thursday, January 21, 2010 8:51 PM
    Tuesday, January 19, 2010 9:12 AM
    Moderator
  • Guys .. This solved.

    How to get XP to talk to windows 7 and share  . .  The actions that MS forgot to tell us all .. Sorry but I do not normally complain about MS as I work closeley with them on other developments but this one has really got me - three weeks to resolve and a lot of digging - MS really want to look at their redundancy testing as it is flawed!!

    This Fix is for XP home but maybe of use for the other variations.

    Ok .. If you are not comfortable in editing the registry then get someone who is as you will need to do so.

    Note: disable or remove any anti-virus/firewall software that you may have installed on both PC's (I use PC's to mean laptops, netbooks etc in the generic)  as these inherit settings from the windows firewall upon installation and we need to setup the windows firewall correctly first as follows:-

    1) Download the hotfix from KB 922120 and install. Once installed reboot - into SAFE Mode as we will now be working in that mode for a while.

    2) Check network properties is showing the the Toplology Discovery Responder and Internet Protocol. If they are not checked then do so and reboot back into SAFE mode.

    3) You will now need to edit the registry (Regedit) setting under currentcontrolset lsa and check that the anyomous settings (there maybe 2 of these) are set to 0. If not,  open the dword and set them to 0.

    4) Now check your IPstack settings and set that to 15 if it isn't already set. This will avoid any 'Server Storage Errors' occuring when you later try to access your shares.

    4) Select and share the folders and devices that you wish to share and ensure that you not only give 'Everyone' access but also the avanced settings are configured the same from the properties tab.

    5) Ensure that windows firewall is on.

    6) Reboot normally

    7) Check your network map in windows 7 - it should be showing all your shares including any network printers.

    8) Try to access your shared folders - It should work with no problems.

    9) Success .. Then reinstall your anti-virus/firewall systems and recheck your access after rebooting both pc's, if not, recheck the above in SAFE MODE as it will only work in this mode.

    10) Want to network your printers through the windows 7 PC then follow this:-

    goto:-

    http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-7/share-files-and-printers-between-windows-7-and-xp/

    scroll right down to you see the reply from 'Backdust45' dec 2nd 2009 5:05

    follow the instructions except for step 6.

    As this point tell windows 7 to refresh it's printer driver list and once cpompleted then select your networked printer.

    Windows 7 will then load the correct drivers an donce completed just follow the on screen instructions. It should lead you to a request for a test print .. Say yes .. and you should be connected.

    Hope that this helps everyone struggling with this and maybe MS may put a KB up showing how to network XP & Windows 7.

    • Marked as answer by zipe5226 Thursday, January 21, 2010 8:51 PM
    Thursday, January 21, 2010 8:51 PM
  • I don't know why you had to go through this procedure. It is not the norm. I've setup Windows 7 on many sites, some with workgroups, some with Active Directory, and all with a mix of OS's including XP. I've never had to do anything like that.

    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Thursday, January 21, 2010 10:40 PM
  • Zipe5226:

    I tried to follow your instructions for a Windows XP Media Center edition PC. I need more detail on the location of the keys that need to be changed in the registry.

    Here are my questions:

    1. When you recommend booting into SAFE mode, do you mean, SAFE mode WITH network support?

    2. I found several sets of LSA settings in the registry. I suspect you mean to change these:

    In the key HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\LSA, change RestrictAnonymous to 0. Also change RestricAnonymousSam to 0.

    Is that correct?

    3. I cannot find where to set the IPStack settings. Can you provide more guidance?

    Thank you.
    Saturday, January 23, 2010 3:01 PM
  • Those registry changes are not normally needed to network XP and Windows 7. Be very careful when changing the registry. Export the existing keys before you make any changes so you can get back to where you are now. At the very least document exactly what changes you make. Playing with this area of the registry may mess up networking so that you will lose all network communications including the Internet. You need to make sure you can restore the registry back to the original settings.


    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Saturday, January 23, 2010 3:23 PM
  • I searched this morning for the same problem listed here. Reverse sharing is a correct term when W7 recognizes and shares files with the xp machine but...the xp machine cannot connect and share with W7.  To further the issue it works intermittently. 

    The W7 machine holds the data one xp machine requires those files for one of my programs.  It will connect and share the files from W7 except when I startup another xp client on my work network.  It seems when I access the W7 machine for files other then what the first machine needs it locks out the first client.  I have to ask my users to close programs using data off W7 machine and reboot the W7 machine and then it can again share both ways. 

    Sometimes I use the W7 machine to transfer files to the XP then work on the files, then with the W7 machine I pull them back up so they can be shared with everyone.

    How do I get my 2 xp machines to share continuously with my 3 W7 machines?
    Thursday, January 28, 2010 12:21 PM
  • Kerry, it seems that you are very knowledgable about those issues.

    I would really appreciate your help!

    I have a PC running XP SP3 and some folders are marked as shared. I would like to access those folders from another PC running Win7 Ultimate

    Both PCs are connected using a wireless router (DHCP), to which I have no access.

    Both PC have a user account with the same user name and password and show WORKGOUP as workgoup name.

    On the Win7 PC, Homegroup Advanced settins are as follows:
    - Network discovery turned on
    - File and printer saring turned on
    - Turn o shring...
    - 128 bit encryption
    - Turn on password protected sharing
    - Use user accouts and passwords to connect to the other computer (I have also tried the "Allow Windows manage homegroup" option without success)

    Now, on the XP PC I just went to Start>Search>Files and Folders changed to search for a computer, entered the IP address of the Win7 PC and after some seconds the Win7 PC appeared in a new window with his IP and I could access it from the XP PC without any additional effort. It did not even ask me for a user name or password.

    On the Win7 PC, however, there seems to be no function to search for a PC using a known IP address? The only thing I could find is See full map from the Network and Sharing Center. Unfortunately, when using this, the XP PC does not appear.
    I also tried to search for and open the XP PC by going to Run and entering \\192.168.0.109 (the XP PCs IP) and tried the same in the Start>Search programs and files area.
    In the first case, Windows 7 opens a new window and then displays an error message saying: "Windows cannot access \\192.168.0.109 You do not have permission to access \\192.168.0.109 ... In thesecod case it states: "Windows cannot access \\192.168.0.109 ... Error code: 0x80070035 The network path was not found.

    I have tried all kinds of things but without any luck thus far. I am not sure why it seems so complicated to search for a computer on the network in Win7 or maybe this is exactly how it's supposed to work but for some reason it does not.

    Would really appreciate your support!

     

    Monday, May 17, 2010 2:31 AM
  • You should start a new thread for this question. Because this tread is already marked as answered very people will see your question. The more people that see it the more likely you are to get an answer,

     


    Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Monday, May 17, 2010 4:25 PM
  • I am not sure why it seems so complicated to search for a computer on the network in Win7 or maybe this is exactly how it's supposed to work but for some reason it does not.

    I don't have a direct answer for you, but I can tell you this:  What you describe is definitely not how it is supposed to work.

    I have computers running XP 32 bit, Vista 64 bit, and Windows 7 32 and 64 bit on my home network (as well as a MacBook running OSX Snow Leopard) and every one of them can see the others, access their shares, and file transfer is very quick I might add.  So it CAN be as good as you're hoping for it to be.  I didn't do anything particularly special, save for disabling HomeGroup networking entirely, and making sure my protocols and router are all compatible.  I did set the workgroup to be Carboni.net for all systems.

    How is it you have no access to your router?  Are you connecting to a public network?

    -Noel

    Monday, May 17, 2010 10:48 PM
  • Kerry,

     

    My windows 7 laptop will not connect to m XP pro machine, or my win2K pro machines or my small business server 2003 server.  it will only connect to the internet whether wired or wireless.  the other machines will occasionally see the laptop but the laptop never sees the other machines.  the laptop will occasionally see the network printer and work, but often will not.

     

    How can I resolve this inter-version networking nightmare.  I cannot upgrade all of the machines.  can't we just have a "classic"  interface for solving this stuff, instead of making it so hidden and difficult in win 7?

    Wednesday, January 05, 2011 5:21 PM
  • Here was my solution, a registry setting:

    Key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\

    Value: restrictanonymoussam

    Data: toggle from 1 to 0

    I did see elsewhere on the 'net that restrictanonymous value should be 0 but mine already was. Somebody else asked about restrictanonymoussam but was told it is ignored if the other one is already 0. That is not true.

    Note you can also set this from the "Local Security Settings" form. In the tree expand: Security Settings -> Local Policies --> Security Options ... then in the left hand pane find "Network access: Do not allow anonymous enumeration of SAM accounts". Make sure this is disabled.

    This is a really poor effort at networking usability. Seems that Microsoft's effort at security is simply to make sure computers can't access each other!

    Friday, April 15, 2011 8:35 PM
  • Those who have surfaced upon this thread with various flavors of inability to connect from Win7 to XP, are not alone. The further I get into my own version of this situation the more I find others fighting the same cannot-get-there-from-here as I am.

    In my case it is a Win7Pro laptop needing to connect to a WinXPPro laptop over a small  wireless network. You can go through Microsoft thread after thread, trying what seems logical, and getting nowhere. You can as I have, take the wireless hub out of the picture by experimenting around it, and still no good.

    No, I am not offering details sufficient for you MS MVPs to be helpful. I created an ID and I am posting here because I am getting darn frustrated with those who surface and say bluntly that this cannot be happening because it is not happening to them. 

    I have been on MS products since before the first version of Windows came out. I was on 3.1 and 3.11, on NT, on XP, Vista and now Win7. By "on" I mean running networks and supporting users on and developing applications for, those platforms. I was on Technet for many years from its beginning, and on Developer Network from when it started also.

    Why do people, especially smaller business people, stay with XP? Because it simply works, period. It does what they need done, period. Win7 is a nice product, I much prefer it to Vista. Unfortunately I am one of the many who spent the extra for Win7Pro because of the need to run XP vintage packages and THEN found out that the processor does not support the necessary virtualization. This is not how you build good referrals, MS.

    Will

     


    Sunday, April 24, 2011 7:55 PM
  • Will, have you checked your firewall settings?  Can you ping one system from the other?  What 3rd party security software do you have (or did you once have)?  Do you have the same user account and password on both systems?

    I hope it made you feel a lot better to vent, because statements like "XP simply works" just make you look silly...  In virtually all the ways that matter, Windows 7 is simply a better OS than XP ever was, even service packed 3 times.  In the lion's share of the cases it's far easier to set up, and (unlike XP) can just run forever stably.  It's way past time to drop that ball and chain.

    I have as much or more history than you, and it sounds like I have a few years more with Windows 7.  I predict you'll figure out what you've done wrong, bop your head, then go on to find Windows 7 is something you really like.

    -Noel

    Tuesday, April 26, 2011 12:06 AM
  • Noel,

    Firewall settings were among the first items I checked. This small wireless network has the older-than-dirt XP Pro system, a Vista Home Pro system, and the latest, the Win7Pro system. The user accounts in use are identical across all three systems, with identical passwords. All are administrator accounts. All three systems have the same a/v / security suite, McAfee. The McAfee firewall settings are identical. McAfee does its own network thing, and interestingly, the McAfee network includes all three systems. Ping fails between the XPPro and the Win7Pro systems, either way. DHCP in the hub however returns the correct ip address for the Win7Pro and the XPPro systems when I ping by computer name and not ip address.

    The Win7Pro system apparently cannot discover the XPPro system let alone access its shares, as the XPPro system cannot discover let alone access the shares on the Win7Pro system. Whether any kind of work or home group is involved seems irrelevant. Real life kind of intruded recently, thus there has been no time to spend on this project. 

    As far as me looking silly, so be it. That XPPro system does what I need done, with little fuss nor bother. It is stable enough that the only time it gets restarted is when the a/v suite demands it. To see that system run stably for 30 days is very common. Its workload starts before 8am, and between 9am and 4:30pm it is working hard running several different charting packages which utilize real time data. That system is typically utilizing 60%+ of the cpu. That system also runs Outlook, various browsers, and whatever else I throw at it as need be. It gets hibernated very late each night, and brought back up by 7am each day. That XPPro system simply works, day in and day out. I was finding that XPPro was proving much more stable that was Vista, fwtw, and certainly easier on resources. Win7 may yet prove as reliable and stable and useful for my needs as has XPPro, only time will tell. As far as me looking silly, I am happy looking silly all the way to the bank. Am I the only person in consumer and small business land who is in no hurry to toss what has worked quietly, calmly and reliably, for years? There are more of us across many different vertical industries than MSFT would prefer, to be sure. 

    Will 


    Will Block
    Thursday, April 28, 2011 2:27 AM
  • Noel,

     All three systems have the same a/v / security suite, McAfee.

    As they say on Mythbusters, "Well there's your problem, right there!"

    In all seriousness, I've been hearing nothing but bad things about McAfee lately.  Honestly, I'd try removing that and seeing how things go.

    Personally I'm fond of Avast Pro for Windows 7.

    -Noel

    Thursday, April 28, 2011 3:37 PM
  • Joining the millions having trouble connecting networks between XP and 7.

    We have three machines, desktop running XP, and two laptops running Windows 7.  The configurations on the two laptops are identical to the extent that I went over them for 10+ hours checking every setting- from adapters to registry to firewalls- and they are on a non-Win7 non-home work network called WORKGROUP.  Only difference is one of the laptops started as home edition and was upgraded to Pro (BAD7), the other started as Pro (GOOD7).

    XPBOX sees all three and can can connect and share with only GOOD7, cannot connect and share with BAD7. 

    GOOD7 can connect and share with XPBOX and BAD7.

    BAD7 can connect and share with GOOD7, but cannot share on Network with XPBOX.  Somehow I can map a drive using IP address and get to XPBOX from BAD7, but this is not sufficient for our needs.

    All 3 are capable of successful pings with each other.

    Bottom line XPBOX and BAD7 will not connect.  Both appear in eachothers network list and when clicked through, Message is "Windows cannot access XPBOX".  Applications that rely on the network fail between the two.  No problems between GOOD7 and XPBOX, identically set up.

    Haved wasted a weeks work and thousands of consulting dollars on this.  Shame on Microsoft.  This is a widespread and extremely nutty problem.

    Thursday, July 07, 2011 11:37 PM
  • I can connect happliy from my windows xp pc to win 7 butnot the other way round - it fails with cannot connect access \\computername. The windows 7 network map shows it has seen it but states that it cannot be placed in the map. I have diabled IPV6 but still no go. Both machines are in a homegroup.

    Anyone got any ideas?

    I had the same exact problem.  After over a month of connecting easily back and forth between two XP desktops and a new Win 7 laptop, the Win 7 laptop stopped connecting to the XP desktop. XP desktop can access the Win7 laptop and access the shared folders. Win7 laptop cannot access the shared folders from the XP desktop. Spent hours and hours troubleshooting. Simple, stupid cause and fix.

    Stumbled across this finally in a help file: "Both computers must be on the same system time."  Yup, had a power failure and the CMOS battery on the XP desktop was bad. Corrected it's time to the correct time and the connection was restored without so much as a reboot.

    Sunday, March 11, 2012 1:59 PM
  • For a home network, (no dedicated server), it seems to me the answer is simply as follows:

    - There must be an account on the PC you want to connect to with the same name as the account you are logged onto on the PC from which you want to connect.

    Historical explanation:

    - Very many "XP Professional" users operate the 'administrator' account as their primary logon (like me). That version of the Windows operating system installed like that.
    - "Windows 7" forces installers to specify a name (other than 'administrator').
    - So, connections from XP to Win7 work ('administrator' to 'administrator'), but connections from Win7 to XP fail ('John' to 'administrator')

    A Work-around:

    - Command Prompt (CMD.exe), 'Run as Administrator', type:
    NET USE \\{the name of your XP machine} * /USER:ADMINISTRATOR
    - Go back and mouse-click on the machine and be surprised!
    (Can you see why it works? Administrator to Administrator).

    Technical:

    - When you click on a computer in 'Network Places', your current username is sent to that computer. If there is no account by that name on the target machine, the connection is rejected.

    • Proposed as answer by edferwerfd Wednesday, September 19, 2012 10:34 AM
    • Edited by edferwerfd Thursday, September 20, 2012 3:01 AM
    Wednesday, September 19, 2012 10:33 AM