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WIN 7 PCs browse the LAN very slowly RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    50% of my networked PCs are running WIN XP and the other half run WIN 7 Pro.

    On a WIN XP PCs, I can go to My Network Places and I instantly see all of the hosts on the network.

    If I do the same on a WIN 7 PC, it takes up to 2 minutes and a few refreshes to finally pull up every device on the network.

    Anyone know why this is occuring in WIN 7 and not XP and possibly a resolution?

     

     

    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 1:43 PM

All replies

  • decki wrote:

    Hello,

    50% of my networked PCs are running WIN XP and the other half run WIN
    7 Pro.

    On a WIN XP PCs, I can go to My Network Places and I instantly see
    all of the hosts on the network.

    If I do the same on a WIN 7 PC, it takes up to 2 minutes and a few
    refreshes to finally pull up every device on the network.

    Anyone know why this is occuring in WIN 7 and not XP and possibly a
    resolution?

     

     

    Do you have by chance any other network client besides of the Windows
    one installed on the Win7 boxes. Then this is very often seen. If you
    have only the Client for MS networks installed and enabled Netbios over
    TCP/IP the My Network places should be displayed instantly.


    Wolfgang
    Thursday, September 29, 2011 5:15 PM
  • Are you referring to the Networking properties under the LAN adapter?

    looks like i only have the MS networks client.

     

    If so, here is what I have installed and enabled:

    1. Client for MS Networks
    2. Virtual PC network filter driver
    3. QoS packet scheduler
    4. file and printer sharing for ms networks.
    5. realtek
    6. realtek
    7. realtek
    8. IPv6
    9. IPv4
    10. link-layer topology discovery mapper driver
    11. link-layer topology discovery responder
    Thursday, September 29, 2011 6:13 PM
  • Try this from Fred Langa's Simple change in settings pumps up Win7 networks article:

    To start, if you’re in a homegroup, exit it. (Need info? See MS’s Help page, “Leave a homegroup.”) Once every PC has left the homegroup, it no longer exists.

    Next, to disable HomeGroup and change encryption levels, open the Control Panel, select Network and Internet, then Network and Sharing Center. Once there, in the left-hand pane choose Change advanced sharing settings.

    It’s a two-click fix, as shown in Figure 1.

    W20101014 TopStory settings Simple change in settings pumps up Win7 networks
    Figure 1. Two quick radio-button clicks are all it takes to restore classic networking speed to Windows 7.

    In the Home or Work section of the dialog box, scroll down to File Sharing Connections and click the radio button for Enable file sharing for devices that use 40- or 56-bit encryption. (Note: You need this setting anyway, if you want to share files between Win7 and an XP box. More on this to come.)

    Next, a bit further down under HomeGroup connections, select Use user accounts and passwords to connect to other computers.

    Save the changes, and you’re done!


    • Edited by jwitalka Thursday, September 29, 2011 8:36 PM
    Thursday, September 29, 2011 8:35 PM
  • decki wrote:

    Are you referring to the Networking properties under the LAN adapter?

    looks like i only have the MS networks client.

     

    If so, here is what I have installed and enabled:

    1. Client for MS Networks 2. Virtual PC network filter driver 3. QoS packet scheduler 4. file and printer sharing for ms networks. 5. realtek 6. realtek 7. realtek 8. IPv6 9. IPv4 10. link-layer topology discovery mapper driver 11. link-layer topology discovery responder

    Yes you only have the Client for MS networks installed.
    Regarding the rest I'd recommend the following:
    If you are not using IPv6 disable that. Further have a look into the
    properties of the IPv4 protocol  / Advanced (TCP/IP settings) / WINS,
    if "Enable NetBIOS over TCP/IP" is checked - or - if all is set via
    DHCP enter "ipconfig -all" in a cmd window and see if this is enabled
    for your Network interface to the local LAN. If it is not enabled
    enable it.

    Although the recommendations of jwitalka are a good advice and I never
    use homegroups myself, I doubt that they would make a human noticable
    timing difference.


    Wolfgang
    Thursday, September 29, 2011 9:09 PM
  • A further explanation of the changes from Fred:


    " Turning off HomeGroup is no loss for me — and, I suspect, for most Windows Secrets readers. Win7 is perfectly happy to use the faster, classic workgroup style of networking. If you know how to share files and devices in XP or Vista, you can do exactly the same thing in Win7 and enjoy faster speeds.

    (If you need help with workgroup networking, see Microsoft’s Help & How-to page, “Join or create a workgroup.” Or (because Vista’s networking menus and dialogs are close to Win7′s) see the Technet Vista networking article, “File and Printer Sharing in Windows Vista.” Internet.com also has a useful tutorial, “Windows Vista Tips: Home Networking Setup Tutorial.”)

    Networking novices, however, might feel more comfortable relying on the convenience of HomeGroup’s automated setup. But if you go this route and run into those annoying slowdowns, you know how to solve the problem.

    I see little downside to dropping from 128- to 56-bit encryption for file transfers. While heavy encryption is absolutely essential for easy-to-eavesdrop Wi-Fi or public connections, it seems like overkill for standard home or office local networking. For a hacker or data thief, there are far easier ways to get information from the machine in the next room or down the hall than trying to decrypt its network file transfers!

    In any case, you can’t use 128-bit file-transfer encryption if there are XP machines (or any other devices using conventional 40- or 56-bit file-transfer encryption) on your LAN. To get Win7 to communicate with XP or those other devices, you must use 40/56-bit encryption.

    I suggest that you try the above changes. If you don’t like the results or it doesn’t work for some reason, just reverse the two changes shown in Figure 1 and you’ll be back where you started with Win7′s default networking setup."

    He benchmarked a 12 % gain in network performance with the change.

     

    Jerry

     

    Thursday, September 29, 2011 11:03 PM
  • Yes, we are not using HomeGroups so they are disabled.

    Could it be a DNS issue?

    Eventually the lists of computers on the network do show up, but only some of them.

    Due to the nature of our software programs, about half of the workstations use static IPs and the other half use DHCP.

     

    Monday, October 3, 2011 3:05 PM