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Windows 7. x64 and x32 versions. upgrading/downgrading RRS feed

  • Question

  • Can I "upgrade" Vista x64 to W7 x32?
    Can I "upgrade" W7 (x32) to W7 (x64)?
    Can I "downgrade" W7 (x64) to W7 (x32)?

    And, yes, I do have reasons.  I want a dual-boot machine with the 32-bit and 64-bit versions and due to some historical factors, I want to switch which version is on which partition without affecting installed apps.  (I've decided I can't stand Vista and I can't get XP to run on this new computer, so dual-booting between the 32-bit and 64-bit versions is the best solution I can find for handling applications that can't run under the 64-bit version, even in XP Mode.)
    Tuesday, January 12, 2010 3:40 AM

Answers

  • 1, Yes, but will require Clean install will have to be performed when upgrading from a 32-bit version to a 64-bit version.
    2. Again, clean install but once your product was installed on the same machine, there's a possibility that it won't activate, which will require phone activation (tell Microsoft rep what you did)
    3, Again clean install, same as answer 2.

    with cavet, if you are going to be dual booting, you'll need an additional license as its treated as a separate machine (even though same hardware). License can only be activated once.

    However, in all the scenarios above, each requires a clean install which requires reinstalling your applications. If you're already Vista 64bit, then an upgrade preserves your applications and data. But a solution is to use Vista backup. Then after the install, restore your data in any clean install scenario.

    Have you run the window 7 upgrade advisor yet? If applications you have can't run in 64bit, either in xp compatibility mode or in XP mode (virtual), then I don't see how remaining in 64bit is going to resolve the problem and in my opinion dual booting isn't going to solve that either.

    Just make sure you have appropriate partitions for both operating systems installed. You can install either before or after, doesn't matter. Windows 7 64 bit setup cannot be started from within Windows 7 32 bit, so if you install that first, you will need to boot from your Windows 7 64 bit disk, click Custom Install during the install options and select the prepared hard disk or partition and Windows 7 will take care of the rest. Once installation is complete, you will have the option when your computer to select either version to boot into. Please note, you can only have 1 activated license, if you need to use both, you will need have both licensed separately, cannot use the same key. However, you can evaluate both for 30 days until decide which one is appropriate for your needs.  (don't activate the key)
    MCSE, MCSA, MCDST [If this post helps to resolve your issue, please click the "Mark as Answer" or "Helpful" button at the top of this message. By marking a post as Answered, or Helpful you help others find the answer faster.]
    • Marked as answer by Vivian Xing Wednesday, January 13, 2010 7:02 AM
    Tuesday, January 12, 2010 4:52 AM

All replies

  • 1, Yes, but will require Clean install will have to be performed when upgrading from a 32-bit version to a 64-bit version.
    2. Again, clean install but once your product was installed on the same machine, there's a possibility that it won't activate, which will require phone activation (tell Microsoft rep what you did)
    3, Again clean install, same as answer 2.

    with cavet, if you are going to be dual booting, you'll need an additional license as its treated as a separate machine (even though same hardware). License can only be activated once.

    However, in all the scenarios above, each requires a clean install which requires reinstalling your applications. If you're already Vista 64bit, then an upgrade preserves your applications and data. But a solution is to use Vista backup. Then after the install, restore your data in any clean install scenario.

    Have you run the window 7 upgrade advisor yet? If applications you have can't run in 64bit, either in xp compatibility mode or in XP mode (virtual), then I don't see how remaining in 64bit is going to resolve the problem and in my opinion dual booting isn't going to solve that either.

    Just make sure you have appropriate partitions for both operating systems installed. You can install either before or after, doesn't matter. Windows 7 64 bit setup cannot be started from within Windows 7 32 bit, so if you install that first, you will need to boot from your Windows 7 64 bit disk, click Custom Install during the install options and select the prepared hard disk or partition and Windows 7 will take care of the rest. Once installation is complete, you will have the option when your computer to select either version to boot into. Please note, you can only have 1 activated license, if you need to use both, you will need have both licensed separately, cannot use the same key. However, you can evaluate both for 30 days until decide which one is appropriate for your needs.  (don't activate the key)
    MCSE, MCSA, MCDST [If this post helps to resolve your issue, please click the "Mark as Answer" or "Helpful" button at the top of this message. By marking a post as Answered, or Helpful you help others find the answer faster.]
    • Marked as answer by Vivian Xing Wednesday, January 13, 2010 7:02 AM
    Tuesday, January 12, 2010 4:52 AM
  • Darn, Darn, Darn.  Leave it to Microsoft to force me to reinstall all the apps.

    Yes, I have two full licenses (I've never trusted Microsoft's upgrades when it comes to licenses) and multiple partitions.  And I do have backups but this means it's probably going to take one or two full days to get everything going.

    And there are two 1/2 reasons for the dual booting: first, I've tested the apps that won't run in XP mode under W7 x64, and they do run under the 32-bit W7.  But only the 64-bit version will take advantage of all the memory in my computer.  So, basically, I will spend most of my time in the 64-bit version and just switch to the 32-bit version for those older apps that I use only occasionally.  I suppose it would be easier to use a Virtual Machine to manage the two, but given my experience with XP Mode, I don't have the time or energy to try a VM solution and then undo it if it doesn't work out.  And, finally, Windows is unreliable which is why every computer I've ever owned is dual-booted, usually between the last Windows version and the current version (e.g., W2K and XP).  The same apps are installed under both on a different partition so when one OS blue-screens, I can boot into the other version and continue working until I can figure out what the problem is. But XP won't run at all on this new computer and I hate Vista so .....

    Thanks for your answer.
    Friday, January 15, 2010 2:54 AM