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DOS Editor in WINDOWS 10 RRS feed

  • Question

  • I don’t even know if this will reach anyone of interest. The category options on this forum web page don’t even make sense. However, here goes.

     I recently tried the upgrade to WINDOWS 10. Every now and then I have occasion to use DOS (my age is showing) and I found to my horror that the plain text DOS editor seems to have been removed from WINDOWS 10. It is something I have used ever since DOS first appeared and I still use it. I quickly went back to my trusty WINDOWS 7.

     Two questions.

     1. Why on earth would MICROSOFT remove it? It’s simple, plain software that has worked forever and was an integral part of DOS.

     2. Does anyone know where I can get a simple, plain text editor that does nothing except the basic text editing functions?

    • Moved by PWMatherMVP Tuesday, February 2, 2016 8:12 AM Win 10 query
    Tuesday, February 2, 2016 3:38 AM

Answers

  • Hi Forestry Phil and everyone,

    # I cannot recommend to use NTVDM, because NTVDM is a Virtual Dos Machine and sometimes causes trouble (I've heard).

    In this thread, I remembered "edit" and "edlin" in MS-DOS and execute "edit.com" with Windows 7 32-bit.


    I wonder why Forestry Phil dwells on "MS-DOS Editor"(edit.com). As mentioned before, we can use "Notepad++", so I'd like to recommend "Notepad++". 

    The below: Notepad++



    Regards.



    Wednesday, February 3, 2016 12:56 AM

All replies

  • Hi Forestry Phil,

    I can hardly understand what you mentioned.
    What is "DOS" and "the plain text DOS editor"?  Is it "cmd.exe" and "notepad.exe"?
    Please tell me its file name(*.exe).
    Are they involved with "Project Server"?
    If so, sorry, I have no idea. 

    Regards.
    Tuesday, February 2, 2016 4:32 AM
  • Hi,

    DOS stands for Disc Operating System. It was the operating system for personal computers that Bill Gates invented originally and his fortune rose from that. Personal computers started to become available in the 1980s and most ran on DOS. WINDOWS was the next big change and that started in the 1990s. WINDOWS allowed you to have several applications open at once and you could swap between them (it was like you were looking in to several windows, which is where the name came from).

    DOS commands are quite simple and a few things are still easier to do in DOS than in WINDOWS. Basically they are commands that let you muck around with files - copy them, delete them, shift them to other 'folders' (which we called 'directories' in DOS) and to run applications. I have been using computers for scientific work since the 1970s. In those days, the only way to get a computer to do anything for you was to write your own programs (or 'apps' as they are now called) to do what you wanted. We didn't have things like WORD, EXCEL etc nor did we have the internet.

    I still write computer programs for scientific work simply because there are no 'apps' available to do the things I want to do. I use a programming language called FORTRAN (short for Formula Translator) which has been around since the 1960s and is geared to doing scientific work and complex calculations. It doesn't draw pretty pictures on the screen! And the software I use to write my programs only works on DOS.

    You'll find if you ask Cortana in WINDOWS 10 to find the DOS prompt it will do so and the DOS box opens on the screen in which you can type DOS commands. Typing Help there will list all the commands available.

    As I said in my post, this all shows my age!

    Hope that helps.

    Tuesday, February 2, 2016 5:03 AM
  • Hello,

    "notepad" is a plain text editor that does nothing except text editing.

    If you don't want to use "notepad" you can download the free notepad++ here: www.notepad-plus-plus.org (tabbed browsing, syntax highlighting, etc...)

    Tuesday, February 2, 2016 5:18 AM
  • Hi Forestry Phil,

    I'm 61 years old, and have used and known MS-DOS, and still now use DOS with Windows. I have some experience about Fortran, COBOL, ALGOL, etc. for work in my younger days.
    You can use Fortran with Windows, i.e. a several Fortran compilers for Windows are available. 

    Well, I'd like to ask you again...
    You described "1. Why on earth would MICROSOFT remove it?".
    What does "it" mean? Please tell me the name, or file name(usually it's *.exe).

    Regards.

    P.S.
     As Swisstone mentioned, "Notepad++" is a nice text editor for programming. It supports the syntax of Fortran. It can run on Windows 10, 8.1, and also 7. I recommend it for you.
    Tuesday, February 2, 2016 5:29 AM
  • MS-DOS Editor aka EDIT.COM was last seen in Windows 7. It was not included in Windows 8.

    As for why it was no longer included, I do not know. I wonder if this was brought up during Windows 8 preview testing. If not, it will probably fall into the "you missed the boat" category. :(

    BUT, have you tried running the EDIT.COM from Windows 7 on Windows 10?

    Tuesday, February 2, 2016 5:58 PM
  • Hello,

    Are you running 64bit or 32bit Windows?

    Edit.com is a 16 bit application so it would only be available on 32bit versions of Windows.


    Thanks, Darrell Gorter [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Tuesday, February 2, 2016 6:42 PM
  • http://www.nano-editor.org/download.php for Windows runs on Windows 10 64x for those not wanting to leave the command prompt and edit a file.
    Tuesday, February 2, 2016 8:01 PM

  • Edit.com is a 16 bit application so it would only be available on 32bit versions of Windows.


    Edit.com is available on Windows 10 32-bit but requires NTVDM be installed in order to run.  Attempting to run edit.com without NTVDM will prompt to have it installed but I personally haven't gone further than the prompt.


    • Edited by john.b_ Tuesday, February 2, 2016 11:32 PM
    Tuesday, February 2, 2016 11:30 PM
  • Hi Forestry Phil and everyone,

    # I cannot recommend to use NTVDM, because NTVDM is a Virtual Dos Machine and sometimes causes trouble (I've heard).

    In this thread, I remembered "edit" and "edlin" in MS-DOS and execute "edit.com" with Windows 7 32-bit.


    I wonder why Forestry Phil dwells on "MS-DOS Editor"(edit.com). As mentioned before, we can use "Notepad++", so I'd like to recommend "Notepad++". 

    The below: Notepad++



    Regards.



    Wednesday, February 3, 2016 12:56 AM
  • Hi,

    DOS stands for Disc Operating System. It was the operating system for personal computers that Bill Gates invented originally and his fortune rose from that. Personal computers started to become available in the 1980s and most ran on DOS. WINDOWS was the next big change and that started in the 1990s. WINDOWS allowed you to have several applications open at once and you could swap between them (it was like you were looking in to several windows, which is where the name came from).

    DOS commands are quite simple and a few things are still easier to do in DOS than in WINDOWS. Basically they are commands that let you muck around with files - copy them, delete them, shift them to other 'folders' (which we called 'directories' in DOS) and to run applications. I have been using computers for scientific work since the 1970s. In those days, the only way to get a computer to do anything for you was to write your own programs (or 'apps' as they are now called) to do what you wanted. We didn't have things like WORD, EXCEL etc nor did we have the internet.

    I still write computer programs for scientific work simply because there are no 'apps' available to do the things I want to do. I use a programming language called FORTRAN (short for Formula Translator) which has been around since the 1960s and is geared to doing scientific work and complex calculations. It doesn't draw pretty pictures on the screen! And the software I use to write my programs only works on DOS.

    You'll find if you ask Cortana in WINDOWS 10 to find the DOS prompt it will do so and the DOS box opens on the screen in which you can type DOS commands. Typing Help there will list all the commands available.

    As I said in my post, this all shows my age!

    Hope that helps.

    Since you're lecturing people who are attempting to help you, I should point out that you do not use DOS to edit files, and you did not do this in Windows 7 either. As you pointed out, DOS is an operating system, and Windows 7 is a separate operating system. Legacy OSes, such as Windows 95 ran on top of DOS, but that hasn't happened since Windows ME (Windows "Might Explode").

    Mike Crowley | MVP
    My Blog -- Baseline Technologies

    • Proposed as answer by themanindbox Thursday, October 19, 2017 4:43 PM
    Thursday, February 4, 2016 5:31 PM
  • Since you're lecturing people who are attempting to help you, I should point out that you do not use DOS to edit files, and you did not do this in Windows 7 either. As you pointed out, DOS is an operating system, and Windows 7 is a separate operating system. Legacy OSes, such as Windows 95 ran on top of DOS, but that hasn't happened since Windows ME (Windows "Might Explode").

    Mike Crowley | MVP

    Oh my great f... god.

    I am 40yo.

    And i too remember the (D)OS times. Today i ran into the same problem you did. I was in the situation where i needed the shell command (yes SHELL/BASH whatever, not dos-exclusive).

    So i found out that our Windows command shell still sucks in comparison to any Unix or fork thereof (Linux anyone?).

    Having a simple command that lets you browse/edit text/ini files on the shell is such a basic, standard, useful feature one can only hit the desk with one´s own forehead multiple times if some company actually removes it.

    But there is hope - since MS is going for native Linux support and more command-line style of computer handling (powershell) we might even get that feature back.

    And no you´re not old and nostalgic. I use the cmd.exe in my daily work as an administrator. I tried not to... but lately i have begun laughing at the guys clicking wildly at an error message on a GUI instead of understanding and solving the problem in-depth.

    Or... what this is all about - to look into a file on the fly, just in a shell. Sure "notepad textfile.txt" works. But it opens a new window - if you wanna do stuff fast you don´t want a new window.

    Also notepad is readily available in a WinPE (Shell Install/Boot ) Environment. Still that doesn´t cut it.

    And tbh.... such a comment from an MvP.... erm... no. Nobody was actually helping the original topic - that MS screwed up a bit here.

    Can´t be that expensive to recode a valuable tool like Edit in 64bit. Or offer a suitable alternative (which Notepad, whatever version, is not.)

    Regards



    • Edited by bitheld Monday, May 9, 2016 2:04 PM
    Monday, May 9, 2016 1:51 PM
  • Perhaps the Ubuntu on Windows has potential

     

    Monday, May 9, 2016 6:05 PM
  • Hi acutally I miss too edit command but if you are looking for a command line editor I advice you to go VIM very powerful and lightweight, although a bit difficult to use at fist.

    http://www.vim.org/download.php#pc

    Sunday, August 14, 2016 9:10 PM
  • Although i don't have any solution to your prob. But I do think you have a point here. 

    Recently i ran into a problem where Win GUI won't boot any further from the OS selection menu (probably due to some changes in CMOS/EFI settings or deleting a small accessory disk partition.) I had access to recovery tools from the menu and and on trying to boot an error code was returned ( online troubleshooting pointed out to some change in h/w >> probably due deletion of an automatically created ~(250-500 mB) partition ) Diskpart was an available handy tool but couldn't help me rescue data. I was looking for edit.exe (as was in Win98-XP etc.) to access some text documents. Later i could rescue data by connecting to another PC and using third party s/w.

    Edit.exe is an under 1mb tool quite fast and useful, so supplying it shouldn't  be a big harm and can be of great help in rescue mode.  Linux for instance supplies editors like vi and a recent one nano so trouble shooting (like resetting forgotten root password and viewing text file contents) becomes a little easier in shell/Terminal mode.
    • Edited by GangaRaam Saturday, January 14, 2017 12:33 PM
    Saturday, January 14, 2017 12:30 PM
  • Diskpart was an available handy tool but couldn't help me rescue data. I was looking for edit.exe .

    You should have been thinking of notepad.exe.   However for rescuing data you would probably also want a good search, e.g. a Regular Expression search.  Then for that I would try  ISE  since PowerShell is supposedly available then too.   In fact, if PowerShell is there presumably you could be using its cmdlets to further your rescue too.

    Edit.exe is an under 1mb tool quite fast and useful, so supplying it shouldn't  be a big harm and can be of great help in rescue mode.

    Are you sure you're not thinking of edlin.exe?   <eg>



    Robert Aldwinckle
    ---

    Sunday, January 15, 2017 3:06 AM
  • The link you provided was for Linux system.  The question was clearly about a CUI text editor for Windows.
    Friday, March 3, 2017 3:01 AM
  • Mike,

    He is not "lecturing" anyone.    Looking at the level of responses  here, I wonder if they understand what the user is asking about.  I am in the same boat and looking desperately to be able to edit text files in Windows using a CUI text editor (is it a good explanation for you?).  He must really feel frustrated by the responses he gets and I don't blame him.  It reminds me of someone trying to "help me" when asking for directions only to be sent in an opposite direction because someone "just tried to help me".

    Friday, March 3, 2017 3:06 AM
  • Bravo!  I felt the same way about the level of responses.  "They just tried to help" reply does not cut it.  If you do not know, just shut up.  Don't try to be helpful, because  you are not.

    Great post.

    Friday, March 3, 2017 3:09 AM
  • Close, but no cigar.  It's good if you are on the same machine.  If you ssh to another Windows machine from bash command line on Windows 10, it drops you in Windows command line and not bash.  Executing a bash command afterwards results in a command line being completely screwed up (terminal not setup properly) so you can forget about using 'vim' to edit any files.  Trying to reset it does not work either so I believe there still is some work to be done.
    Friday, March 3, 2017 3:11 AM
  • I know it's not quite the same, however, QB64 is a command prompt based editor. I too was in search of edit.com and I came across your page. I originally had trouble getting QB64 to work with Win10 however others have had success. Hope this helps. QB64 is a branch off of qbasic --- similar format to edit.com

    Damon

    Thursday, March 9, 2017 4:22 AM
  • Notepad.exe can be run from the dos(CMD command) prompt. I use it to edit my dos batch files all the time in WIN 10.
    Sunday, March 19, 2017 1:25 PM
  • The OP worded the second question somewhat ambiguously.

    I'm not even going to try to answer the first question; I doubt anyone knows the answer, not even Microsoft themselves. I guess they just don't know what SSH is.

    As for the second question:

    "2. Does anyone know where I can get a simple, plain text editor that does nothing except the basic text editing functions?"

    If you simply mean any kind of text editing software, then I suggest either simply the built-in notepad, or Notepad++ (https://notepad-plus-plus.org/download/)

    If, more likely, you mean a text editor you can use directly within the Command Prompt, then you should look at nano (https://www.nano-editor.org/dist/win32-support/) (the .exe file)

    Sadly, with the removal of edit.com, there is no native way to edit files like this. This seems to be a major flaw to me: now there is no way to natively edit files through SSH. I wonder how MS could just overlook this.

    Anyway, hopefully I answered your question. Please don't forget to upvote if I did!

       -DanoValo

    • Proposed as answer by DanoValo Sunday, June 4, 2017 10:43 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by DanoValo Sunday, June 4, 2017 10:44 PM
    Sunday, June 4, 2017 10:42 PM
  • Best I've come up with from a "stock" command prompt is "notepad filename.ext" This does open as a window, but accomplishes the task of editing a file from the dos prompt. And you can exit with alt-f,s and alt-f,x.

    Phil, if you're still around.... (This is an old thread) I'm in the same boat. Editing login scripts, batch files, etc. Seems amazing to me programmers were better in the 1980's than they are today. 30+ years later I still find myself absent mindedly typing edit filename. Edit ran on Basic, also no longer included. And it was a big improvement over edlin.

    Cheers!


    Wednesday, July 5, 2017 5:44 PM
  • Use Notepad.exe
    Monday, August 14, 2017 10:10 PM
  • Use Notepad.exe

    Use Notepad? That is a GUI, so I say Notepad++ :)

    What about something in the command prompt on modern command prompts in Windows 10?

    Monday, August 14, 2017 10:44 PM
  • Notepad for further users! Be a bolder!
    Wednesday, October 18, 2017 3:23 PM
  • I realize this is a late response to a very old thread.  However, I commiserate with Forestry Phil.  I too, long for the days when you could simply type "edit xxx.bat" and instantly have a dos prompt change into a blue screen that responded to Wordstar control sequences.  I've tried a bunch of freeware since then: VIM, notepad++ and alike, however, nothing was as quick to respond, and just the rudimentary commands that would allow a real programmer; versus a drag'n drop artist, to get in and out of a file quickly.  I'm not trying to slight new programmers.  However, programming used to be a way to make the software work, and keep it small, with tight little algorithms that performed a function or task in the least amount of time.  Now it's more how fast can you generate a routine and get it right the first time by reusing and replicating instances or blocks of code.  Very wasteful of memory space.  

    Whoops!  I really digressed.  I started to say, I wonder why someone hasn't sat down with their favorite C/C++ compiler and simply recreated EDIT.COM.  How hard would it be to create a console application that used the same WordStar commands to edit a file?   You would need to start from scratch since the original EDIT.COM was written for 16-bit machines, and later recompiled for 32-bit architecture.  What used to work in 32-bit cannot work in our 64-bit world.  It would be very cool if Microsoft would release the old EDIT source code to the public domain, but I won't hold my breath.  
    Thursday, October 19, 2017 1:39 PM
  • Yes, we all seem to looking for the old days.

    Pls remember that all the code you write is hitting the registers of the Processor.  If you need to view the code there was only one way to do this.  Debug was you ultimate tool to put ASCII characters in your code that also controlled the Printer (If you knew which one you had access to)

    Remember, it is the Microprocessor that did all the work for you and knowing how the read assembler code put you as the programmer in charge of everything.  Writing BATCH files with control codes is still a problem when you need to use extended character codes and very few of the DOS editing software was capable of editing the special codes without blowing up in your face.  Back to basics

    EDIGuru


    EDIGURU

    Tuesday, December 12, 2017 1:13 AM
  • A point of interest Bill Gates and Paul Allen bought DOS in 1981.

    I recommend Notepad ++ to edit DOS/Windows NT Command level files using Window 10 either in 64bit or 32bit mode.

    If I am showing my age ... I am just a Computer Historian ... not necessarily a friend of Ada Lovelace the first ever programmer.    

    Sunday, December 24, 2017 12:22 AM
  • To Dr. Debugger: I also sorely miss edit.com, last seen in Windows 10 32-bit.

    "Replacements" that open a window, or have user interfaces wildly different from the DOS editor of old, are not good for me. Also I don't want to learn a new computer language just to write my own editor. The point of this post is: I am generally pretty cheap, but would gladly donate to anyone who writes a 64-bit replacement for edit.com. I think there must be thousands like me who also aren't dead yet.

    Monday, January 1, 2018 2:23 AM
  • I know this is very old thread, some of these responses are hillarious, so I felt compeld to reply :)

    You can use dosbox and work in edit.com in there, I use it since I prefer DOS environment when drafting batch scripts.

    Dosbox: http://www.dosbox.com/

    If you don't have copy of edit, then google "old dos", I´m sure you can find a downloadable zip file which includes Microsoft editor

    • Proposed as answer by Raasan Sunday, February 25, 2018 12:24 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by Raasan Sunday, February 25, 2018 12:25 AM
    • Proposed as answer by Raasan Sunday, February 25, 2018 12:25 AM
    Monday, January 22, 2018 1:40 PM
  • Hasn't anyone tried the built in line-editor called edlin?
    Sunday, February 25, 2018 12:26 AM
  • Bill Gates didn't invent DOS. He bought it for $50,000 or so from a pour soul who developed it, and didn't know he was holding gold in his hand. It was based on an earlier system called CP/M.

    Personal computers started to become available in the mid-1970's, and most ran all sorts of OSs. Only when the IBM-PC became popular, DOS became popular as it was the OS it was supplied with.

    Windows 1.0 came out in 1985, but only by version 3.1, which came out around 1990, did it become popular (and useful).

    Monday, April 16, 2018 6:14 AM
  • I would also donate to anyone telling me which alternative is available for Windows 10 64-bit to such a simple feature as edit/nnn which was able to show a text in binary mode starting a new line at a specific length.

    Have people stopped working with positional data nowadays? And how they manage on Windows without a command as simple as edit/nnn?

    Sunday, May 27, 2018 11:31 PM
  • Notepad++ and other editors put hidden characters at the start of the file.  I'm not sure if PowerShell_ISE puts characters there, also (I don't think so), but neither PS_ISE nor ordinary Notepad will show or remove these characters.

    Create a file in ordinary notepad and look at the beginning of the file in the CMD prompt (>TYPE File.ext).  Then edit it with Notepad++ and look at it again with TYPE in CMD.  You'll see characters like "∩╗┐#" at the beginning of the file that you can't see, or more importantly, remove in any of the Win 10/64 editors.  Microsoft programs, i.e. Word, Excel, etc.  put even more "funny" characters at  the beginning of the file.  The only way I've found to remove these characters is to use "TYPE" then copy (in CMD) and paste into a completely new NOTEPAD file and SaveAS over the original.  Of course, this creates it's own problems with line wrapping, etc. in CMD.  If it's something realy short, you can always use "COPY CON" but there's no going back and editing or inserting a line once you've used ENTER.

    Bring back debug.exe and edlin.exe

    Tuesday, May 29, 2018 4:10 PM
  • Bring back debug.exe and edlin.exe


    What about using the Linux Subsystem?  Surely there are relevant tools available for it?


    Robert Aldwinckle
    ---

    Tuesday, May 29, 2018 10:43 PM
  • Hello, Mike Crowley,

    Before you take this tone with a well-intentioned inquisitor, you should perhaps read the thread to which you're responding.  This person's post was in response to another reader who specifically asked about some of the things the OP was talking about.  He wasn't "lecturing people who are attempting to help".

    And while you point out that "you do not use DOS to edit files", if the program one was using to perform the edit was actually part of the operating system, as EDIT.COM or EDLIN.COM were standard parts of DOS, then I think your point is actually incorrect.  And technically, even if the edit program weren't a part of the OS, it'd have a hell of a time editing the file without the support provided by the OS.  Indeed, it wouldn't even be able to run.

    It would have been nice to post some actually useful information instead of self-promotion.

    Have a great day,

    Kelly Murphy

    Wednesday, June 27, 2018 4:41 PM
  • I REALLY feel for all of you fellow old-timers [This coming from a 58 yo CompSci BS '83  programmer with 30+ yrs C (no bloody ++, # or D! - Trekkers will get that one) experience. Long live BSD 4.x!]

    Reality hit the fan today when I got a notice from Firefox, apparently the last of the good-guys,  that they will no longer be supporting my Win XP OS which I have clung to since I bought my last personal home desk top (~'04). I happened by this thread hoping someone was aware of a version of... wait for it... Norton Editor (NE.COM), which I still use religiously, that was later than the one I currently run on Windows XP, (gasp '98!) and 10. As mentioned previously, a fully compatible version of EDIT would be a great (albeit less featured) compromise, but from the sounds of it, that is no longer an option either.

    I've been running a newer Win10 company supplied machine under the desk next to my trusty XP and rarely switch to it (KVM switches don't seem to work well with the newer machine - it doesn't seem to like to have it's mouse and keyboard taken away and returned, so I don't bother turning it on except to test and get on the internet when I don't use my tablet for internet) primarily because Windows XP and 10 are supposedly no longer compatible sharing drives with each other on the wired Ethernet LAN I have in my home like Win 7 was. So transferring files means trays full of random thumb drives. Ugh. I refuse to go wireless.

    Anyway, I've gotten NE, which to me is more familiar than Edit ever was through the years, to more or less run in a "DOS Box"  emulator on the Windows 10. I HAVE used it a lot with great results. It has always had the issue with a trailing CR (or is it an LF?) so you may need to do a quick trunc of  .c or other files before recompiling. You can find copies scattered about the net, as it has been out of support (not like it ever really needed any) for many years, so it may be a good line editor option for you all.

    And if anyone can suggest a seamless, reliable way of sharing full drives between XP and Win 10  on a closed Ethernet, I'd love to hear about it. Looks like I have a lot of catching up on Win 10 to do.

    Thanks for all the memories.

    Mike

    P.S. No we didn't have Excel, but we DID have Lotus 1-2-3 under DOS (still have my floppies and binder) for anyone who remembers that :)

    P.P.S. Love the term "drag'n drop artist" earlier in the thread, lol, that's perfect mind if I borrow that from now on? Beats my "cut n' paste programmers" term that seems to offend the youngsters.

    Sorry if I offended anyone reminiscing with you all, I'm just a cranky old codger, I mean coder.

    Saturday, June 30, 2018 6:07 AM
  • I have no idea if you found a solution that works for you yet. I was looking for the same thing, that is how I found your post. I feel your frustration.

    Maybe you have heard of far manager. It has an editor as well. It is basically a norton commander/dos navigator clone. Worth a try, worked for me :) It even has syntax highlighting and lots of plugins.

    Let me know if it helped!

    https://farmanager.com/screenshots.php?l=en

    • Proposed as answer by NTVDMx64 Friday, November 16, 2018 7:58 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by NTVDMx64 Friday, November 16, 2018 7:58 AM
    Friday, October 12, 2018 6:54 PM
  • combine Far Manager with 

    http://www.columbia.edu/~em36/ntvdmx64.html

    and this

    http://www.lexitec.fi/xywrite/utility.html vdosplus...

    Friday, November 16, 2018 8:02 AM
  • What a completely bamboozling thread highlighting exactly what is wrong with the information age - Nobody fully reads anything anymore, along with so called experts assuming everybody means Notepad++ when like myself, all I wanted was a dos based win32 text editor so I don't need to use the mouse and carry on in my command prompt.

    This question was answered above with the thread that mentioned nano - a simple text editor for linux.

    If anyone looked longer than 2 seconds on that link, they would of found the win32 version of nano.

    Download this and rename to edit.exe, then copy into windows\system32.

    A link to directly download nano. Nano Win32 DOS

    • Proposed as answer by DeeferDawg Sunday, November 18, 2018 9:08 PM
    Sunday, November 18, 2018 9:08 PM
  • I too am a similar vintage to Foresty Phil and I also miss the DOS editor, I've been using PFE(Programmer's File Editor) from Lancaster University since (don't ask) - you can get it here:

    https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/staff/steveb/cpaap/pfe/pfefiles.htm

    The 32 bit version runs happily in W10 and it optionally writes DOS/Unix End-Of-Record terminators.

    Cheers

    Saturday, January 19, 2019 9:24 AM
  • Hi Phil,

    1. The Edit.com project was 16-bit and was not renewed. So it works on Windows 7 32 bit and does not work on any 64 bit Windows.

    2. Alternatively, use the Brief Editor (http://www.briefeditor.com). Works on x86 and x64 architecture. Install the MSI file and use it through the command prompt.

    Monday, April 22, 2019 5:24 PM
  • The single line editor Edlin has a lot a fans ; the most popular instance is called "Vim".

    For editing large documents (more than 64k), I used "NE.exe", norton editor. It could edit about 550K.

    When my reverse engineer studies reached that limit, I discovered "me.exe", multi-edit.

    This 16 bit DOS text editor could edit up to 16 meg documents.

    The windows 16 bit version, multi-edit version 7.0, was still using an internally generated paging system, so it was as fast as the DOS version.

    The next improvement, the 32 bit multiedit version 8.0 was relying on Windows to do the disk swapping. It was taking a few minutes to load a large document, but once in the cache, the penalty was about running at half the speed. So, Microsoft did a good job.

    Thursday, May 2, 2019 6:18 AM