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Documents and settings\<user>\local settings folders (OR users\<userid>\local settings folder)

    Question

  • Is there any way for me to access this folder? I am an administrator on my system and I have turned on "Show hidden files" and unchecked "Hide extensions for known ..." and "Hide protected operating ...." options in folder options.

    I see the folder users\<userid>\local settings but am unable to list files in it.

    I have tried to disable "user policy" in control panel/users and even tried a few things with the secpol, but to no avail.

    Does anyone know how to get to this folder.

     

    Friday, June 30, 2006 7:41 PM

Answers

  • There is an Deny ACE on Everyone for listing the contents of that folder. right-click the folder, and choose properties, then use the security tab. I believe you'll need to click advanced and then edit.

    Personally, though, I'd let the installer do it's job and create all of the right registry settings and directory structure. If you are saying that the 1.1 installer fails, email me the details, as that would be a bug. Multiple .net frameworks can co-exist quite nicely.

    Tuesday, July 04, 2006 8:35 PM

All replies

  •  Ashokag99 wrote:

    I see the folder users\<userid>\local settings but am unable to list files in it.

    The security settings in Vista are designed this way. You can edit the NTFS permissions and remove the deny entry that is preventing you from listing the files.

    In a production environment, or in a environment where you are managing computers for users, though, I would be quick to ask what advantage you will be gaining by changing the security structure in Windows Vista.

    Sunday, July 02, 2006 7:46 AM
  • Byron,

    I am installing software that downloads the .NET framework 1.1 and installs it as part of its own installation process. Since Vista has .NET Framework 3.0 already installed, I dont really want to install the .NET framewrok 1.1.  The only way for me to bypass this behavior is to copy the dotnetfx file in the temp folder. I am unable to do that in Vista.

    How do I edit NTFS permissions on Vista? I am an admin on my system and I try to go to the security dialog. I see "Full Control" for the "Administrator" group, but when I look at "Effective Permissions" tab in the advanced section for my user ID, I see that "Full control" and "List Folder / Read Data" Are unchecked. Further more, when I try to save changes I get a message saying "Access denied" And something to do with insufficient priviledges. I am unable to figure out how to modify this setting. thanks.

    Monday, July 03, 2006 10:27 PM
  • There is an Deny ACE on Everyone for listing the contents of that folder. right-click the folder, and choose properties, then use the security tab. I believe you'll need to click advanced and then edit.

    Personally, though, I'd let the installer do it's job and create all of the right registry settings and directory structure. If you are saying that the 1.1 installer fails, email me the details, as that would be a bug. Multiple .net frameworks can co-exist quite nicely.

    Tuesday, July 04, 2006 8:35 PM
  • Is there a difference between Document and Settings and Users?  They seem to be the same thing (user profile folders with the same sub-folders), but why the two sets of profile folders, and why is Documents and Settings so locked down?

    And where will files get copied... both places?  A little confusing.

    Is this a backward compatibility thing?

    Tuesday, July 11, 2006 2:33 AM
  • I'm also finding the Deny ACE on for Everyone on a variety of folders that older programs seem to need access to.  Can someone explain why it is necessary for Vista to place the  Deny ACE's everywhere like this?

    In my case I have some software that seems to misbehaving due to the fact that the Application Data shortcut has this ACE present.  It appears that this shortcut redirects to AppData\Roaming, so why the DENY?
    Wednesday, February 07, 2007 5:44 PM
  • I guess the Administrator is no more an Administrator. This will make people think before going for Windows Vista.
    Tuesday, February 13, 2007 3:18 AM
  • I've had quite some furious moments with this folder also.

    Eventually I enabled the Administrator account, logged in as it and did a "take ownership" of my complete C drive.  That worked.  All protected files and folders are now accessible.

    Right click "C:" - Properties - Security - Advanced - Owner - Edit

    Select user that needs to be owner and tick on "Replace owner on subcontainters and object"

    During this process Vista complaints about some objects and folders that are still inaccessable but they quite don't matter.

     

    Greetz

    Thursday, February 15, 2007 10:58 PM
  • Thank's a milion Styx, you've saved me from a nervous breakdown.

    This was the fourth big isue I had with Vista in the two days I own it, and I was about to go back to XP.

    Your solution worked for me just fine, though it was time consuming (I had to click 'continue' thosand times because of Norton).

    Thnx again

     

    Saturday, February 17, 2007 4:29 PM
  • You're welcome Ales. I've got vista since last saturday and I can tell you that I share your agitation.

    Can you tell me what the other three issues were ?

    I'm still f***in' around to get the event viewer started, but that's in another post.

     

    Greetz

    Saturday, February 17, 2007 10:56 PM
  • The machine is still thinking about it but Styx; thanks in advance. I'm still unconvinced. I am tempted to downgrade back to XP
    Thursday, January 03, 2008 10:33 AM
  • Documents and Settings is a reparse point, not a folder or shortcut.  If you look closely in Explorer you'll see it has a slightly different icon to a shortcut (pale larger icons, different face on smaller ones).  Reparse points (also known as Junctions) are a new concept in Windows 6.  Think of them as an alias for somewhere else in the filesystem similar to UNIX filesystem links.  Unlike shortcuts (which are just a  file type) these are part of the file system structure itself.

     

    In Vista they have been used to allow legacy stuff to map onto the new file system structure which is physically quite different to XP, etc.  Do not mess with the security settings of default reparse points such as those you mention.  Instead learn where the physical directories to which they point exist and access those directly.  Refer to the help on the DIR command's /a:l switch for how to find out what are reparse points and where they point.  For example, open a CMD prompt and change directory to C:\Users\<your profile>.  Type DIR /a:l and all will be revealed.  If you want the whole picture, CD to the root and type DIR /a:l /s

     

    To answer your specific question, access to:

      

    C:\Documents and settings\<user>\Local Settings

     

     can be gained via:

     

    C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Local

     

     - where <profile> is the user's profile, which may have a different name to <user> if the user has been renamed or contains a domain suffix. In here everything will be familiar and accessible to you.  Here are some real directories for familiar legacy directory names provided by reparse points on most Vista systems:

     

    Application Data

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming

    Cookies

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Cookies
    My Documents

      C:\Users\<profile>\Documents
    NetHood

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Network Shortcuts

    PrintHood

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Printer Shortcuts
    Recent

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Recent
    SendTo

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\SendTo
    Start Menu

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu
    Templates

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Templates

    Saturday, February 02, 2008 2:16 AM
  • I've been trying to resolve this problem on a new machine - all my own, in which I should have full access to everything, not, repeat, not associated with a network of any sort.  I've tried resetting to the Administrator's account and to the User's account, which I'll simply call Spider.  I've followed all instructions, all without effect.  However, what strikes me as most interesting is trying the info in the quoted message below, which is quite interesting and makes good sense.  Except for one thing:

    In going to the command line and looking at lists of directories, I find that any reference to a directory named AppData is missing!  In other words, when I type:

    cd \users\spider

    and then type:

    dir

    A list of subdirectories comes up, but not one named AppData.  The same is true when looking for AppData under the Public directory, which is simply a subset of the already-inadequate list of subdirectories under Spider.

    I have Vista Ultimate.  At this point, it looks like Ultimate refers to the Ultimate Microsoft Aggravation.  Right now, I'd love to go back to DOS.

    Can anyone offer any ideas?
    -------------------------------------------------------------------

     Bondi Beach wrote:

    Documents and Settings is a reparse point, not a folder or shortcut.  If you look closely in Explorer you'll see it has a slightly different icon to a shortcut (pale larger icons, different face on smaller ones).  Reparse points (also known as Junctions) are a new concept in Windows 6.  Think of them as an alias for somewhere else in the filesystem similar to UNIX filesystem links.  Unlike shortcuts (which are just a  file type) these are part of the file system structure itself.

     

    In Vista they have been used to allow legacy stuff to map onto the new file system structure which is physically quite different to XP, etc.  Do not mess with the security settings of default reparse points such as those you mention.  Instead learn where the physical directories to which they point exist and access those directly.  Refer to the help on the DIR command's /a:l switch for how to find out what are reparse points and where they point.  For example, open a CMD prompt and change directory to C:\Users\<your profile>.  Type DIR /a:l and all will be revealed.  If you want the whole picture, CD to the root and type DIR /a:l /s

     

    To answer your specific question, access to:

      

    C:\Documents and settings\<user>\Local Settings

     

     can be gained via:

     

    C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Local

     

     - where <profile> is the user's profile, which may have a different name to <user> if the user has been renamed or contains a domain suffix. In here everything will be familiar and accessible to you.  Here are some real directories for familiar legacy directory names provided by reparse points on most Vista systems:

     

    Application Data

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming

    Cookies

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Cookies
    My Documents

      C:\Users\<profile>\Documents
    NetHood

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Network Shortcuts

    PrintHood

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Printer Shortcuts
    Recent

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Recent
    SendTo

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\SendTo
    Start Menu

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu
    Templates

      C:\Users\<profile>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Templates

    Monday, February 18, 2008 8:54 PM
  • Try using the DIR switches that include hidden and system files/directories.  AppData is a hidden directory.

    Monday, February 18, 2008 9:55 PM
  • Thank you!  That was a big "Duh!" on my part.  As it turns out, since I had already unhidden all directories, I found the directories via Vista.  It never occurred to me that they'd also be hidden in a DOS-type of format.  I'm still not out of the woods in trying to resolve the problems I'm dealing with, but if more help is needed, I'll be back.

     Bondi Beach wrote:

    Try using the DIR switches that include hidden and system files/directories.  AddData is a hidden directory.

    Monday, February 18, 2008 10:08 PM
  • Thankyou for sharing this info! I hate the fact that Vista has taken control, now at least I can have some back.

    with thanks and regards Daz

    Sunday, April 06, 2008 10:01 AM
  •  Ok so what do you do when you have an application (Autodesk) that stores its temp files in "C:\users\Local Settings\Temp" are you saying they are really somewhere else? If so I was unable to find them, I just wound up running a regedit and adding "Take Ownership" to my context menu and applying this to folders I still need access to.

    Thursday, April 10, 2008 11:50 PM
  • Hi All,

     

     Would just like to add my thanks to Styx. I just switched (actually bought a system with) to Vista 64. Here I was thinking maybe all the reports of Vista being a step backwards from XP were blown out of proportion and I run into a wall just accessing Documents and Settings. I can see now this operating system is gonna be a pain. AnyWho Thanks again Styx you saved the few hairs I've got left on my head.

     

    Medicanman....

    Monday, August 18, 2008 8:10 PM
  • You are not kidding! Vista is a joke! Just simplytransferring my .pst file over from my previous laptop, their help tells me what I already know - to put my old .pst fdata files in Doc&Settings\<user>\Local Settings\Application Data\ etc... which Ive done a hundred times with W2K and XP PRO. I'm 'using' Vista Home Premium and went in and changed the file properties to show hidden files but there is NO Local Settings folder??? There IS one called Local, is that supposed to have been what they meant? But even if so, other than horrendus help documentation there is NO Application Data folder under that anyhow.

    Why didnt they just leave well enough alone? No doubt some things needed to be fixed, enhanced etc, but as a new Vista user it looks to me that they paid a bunch a developers to change things just for the sake of changing things, or to justify their salary, or to force us to buy a new product. All Billy G is doing is pushing us harder and harder to go to Linux and Open office. If I didnt know better I'd say he was doing it on purpose after seeing some of the stupid *** Ive seen so far in Vista.

     

    Thursday, November 20, 2008 2:45 AM
  • OK.

     

    What is the easiest way to recreate the two ones in C:\ (Ithink Program Files, and Documents and Settings), which I delete thinking they were some virus' creation?

     

    Sunday, November 23, 2008 6:20 PM
  • My thanks also Styx.  I was at the stage of banging the table and swearing.  I could not customise the menus, arrange things how I wanted or import the programs from XP even with their utility all because of this crazy stupidity. It must have wasted at least a couple of hours of my time before I started searching for the answer online.

     

     Some novices may need protecting from their own ignorance but Microsoft PLEASE do do not do anything so stupid with Win 7 for the rest of us - not that I plan to be an early adopter.

     

     

    Andy

    Friday, November 28, 2008 9:51 PM