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Windows 10 Pro to Windows 10 Enterprise 2015 RRS feed

  • Question

  • I've got 60 or so PCs running Windows 10 Pro.  They were formerly running Windows 7 Pro with KMS activation.

    I upgraded my KMS server to Server 2012 R2 and installed the host KMS key.

    In the meantime, the "Upgrade to Windows 10" icons started showing up on my enterprise PCs, like they do on consumer PCs.  So, in order to test our applications, I upgraded a few to Windows 10 Pro via the "Free upgrade".

    Now I would like to activate all PCs via KMS.  I have about 7 PCs which I have reinstalled Windows 10 Enterprise from scratch on.  The rest are running Windows 10 Pro from the "Free upgrade".

    The problem is I need 25 to validate the KMS host.  I only have 7 that are not in use and can have Windows reinstalled on them without disrupting the workflow.

    When I try to add the KMS client product key via slmgr.vbs /ipk I get the error message: Error: 0xC004F069 On a computer running Microsoft Windows non-core edition, run 'slui.exe 0x2a 0xC004F069'."  I get this error message even if I have removed the prior product key via slmgr.vbs /upk.

    I have also tried doing an upgrade from the Windows 10 Enterprise media.  The only option I'm presented with, when asked what I want to keep, is "nothing" because "Windows might have been installed in a non-standard directory."  So that method doesn't work.

    Please tell me there's a way to change the product key and activate these machines with KMS, without having to reformat and reinstall Windows 10 Enterprise from scratch.

    Friday, July 1, 2016 3:06 PM

Answers

  • Using changepk.exe and WICD produced error messages when tried; neither method was successful.

    Turns out what happened was this:

    PCs were originally imaged, by me, for Windows 7 Pro with a KMS key & server.  When I did the "free upgrade" Microsoft pushed out to everyone (including, bizarrely, the domain PCs), it converted them to MAK licensed versions of Windows 10 Pro.

    There does not seem to be a way to change the MAK install to a KMS install without doing a clean install.

    So, my resolution is: install Windows 10 Enterprise 2015 on a VM, try to activate it on the KMS server I set up, then reset the VM and repeat 25 times.

    Having done that, I can now activate the actual 7 or 8 Windows 10 Enterprise 2015 installs I've done and convert the Windows 10 Pro free upgrade PCs (convert = do a clean install of Win10Ent and restore user data from separate network backups) to Windows 10 Enterprise 2015.  I can do this as employees have down time, incrementally, without having to worry about exceeding the 3 day time limit to activate Windows, now that the KMS server has been validated by 25 activation attempts.

    Again, we have 64 PCs but only 7 or 8 were not being immediately used and were available for the Win10 Enterprise install.  So this is the workaround to have a functional KMS server for Win10 Ent. without disrupting the business flow for 15 or so unlucky users.

    End result: enterprise customers should not use the "free upgrade" to Windows 10 that FOR SOME REASON GETS PUSHED OUT TO THEIR DOMAIN JOINED, KMS LICENSED, PCs REGARDLESS!

    This practice by Microsoft makes no sense.  Why do KMS licensed machines, joined to a domain, get the "free upgrade" that will change their licensing scheme in the first place?

    Anyway, those are the facts.



    • Marked as answer by Brian Brock Wednesday, July 13, 2016 1:08 PM
    • Edited by Brian Brock Wednesday, July 13, 2016 1:11 PM additional information
    Wednesday, July 13, 2016 1:08 PM

All replies

  • Code: 0xC004F069

    Description:
    The Software Licensing Service reported that the product SKU is not found.

    That error suggests that you have a mismatch of installed-product -> product-key.
    Are you trying to apply the Pro pkey or the Ent pkey ?
    Is the installed edition of Win10 actually currently Pro or Ent?

    You updated your WS2012R2 KMShost, with the WS2012R2+Win10 host pkey?

    https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/askcore/2015/09/15/windows-10-volume-activation-tips/

    On the KMSclients and on the KMShost, you've checked via
    slmgr.vbs /dlv all
    that all is matching and configured as required, and the current_count / requests_received are incrementing as expected?
    The events in event log (12288/12289/12290/12291/12292/etc) on client and on host are confirming correct transmit_request and receive_request and transmit_response and receive_response?


    Don [doesn't work for MSFT, and they're probably glad about that ;]

    Saturday, July 2, 2016 10:42 AM
  • to upgrade the edition from Pro to Ent, you can do it via the Settings App (Updates -> Activation -> change product key) or try using the changepk.exe (if you're going to do it manually) or you can use WICD to create a ppkg file

    https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/askcore/2015/11/23/how-to-convert-windows-10-pro-to-windows-10-enterprise-using-icd/

    https://technet.microsoft.com/itpro/windows/deploy/windows-10-edition-upgrades


    Don [doesn't work for MSFT, and they're probably glad about that ;]

    Saturday, July 2, 2016 10:49 AM
  • Using changepk.exe and WICD produced error messages when tried; neither method was successful.

    Turns out what happened was this:

    PCs were originally imaged, by me, for Windows 7 Pro with a KMS key & server.  When I did the "free upgrade" Microsoft pushed out to everyone (including, bizarrely, the domain PCs), it converted them to MAK licensed versions of Windows 10 Pro.

    There does not seem to be a way to change the MAK install to a KMS install without doing a clean install.

    So, my resolution is: install Windows 10 Enterprise 2015 on a VM, try to activate it on the KMS server I set up, then reset the VM and repeat 25 times.

    Having done that, I can now activate the actual 7 or 8 Windows 10 Enterprise 2015 installs I've done and convert the Windows 10 Pro free upgrade PCs (convert = do a clean install of Win10Ent and restore user data from separate network backups) to Windows 10 Enterprise 2015.  I can do this as employees have down time, incrementally, without having to worry about exceeding the 3 day time limit to activate Windows, now that the KMS server has been validated by 25 activation attempts.

    Again, we have 64 PCs but only 7 or 8 were not being immediately used and were available for the Win10 Enterprise install.  So this is the workaround to have a functional KMS server for Win10 Ent. without disrupting the business flow for 15 or so unlucky users.

    End result: enterprise customers should not use the "free upgrade" to Windows 10 that FOR SOME REASON GETS PUSHED OUT TO THEIR DOMAIN JOINED, KMS LICENSED, PCs REGARDLESS!

    This practice by Microsoft makes no sense.  Why do KMS licensed machines, joined to a domain, get the "free upgrade" that will change their licensing scheme in the first place?

    Anyway, those are the facts.



    • Marked as answer by Brian Brock Wednesday, July 13, 2016 1:08 PM
    • Edited by Brian Brock Wednesday, July 13, 2016 1:11 PM additional information
    Wednesday, July 13, 2016 1:08 PM