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Created windows 7 image with expired sysprep rearm count. RRS feed

  • Question

  • It seemed like a good idea at the time. I work in several schools that all required much the same programs on their image, based around a windows 7 enterprise iso. All legal.

    Using MDt2010 I built an image in vmserver, and sucked it back using the litetouch.vbs with a sysprep and capture task sequence.

    I then took the captured .wim to two schools, deployed it to a virtual machine in each school, made site appropriate changes and ran litetouch.vbs again with the same task sequence.

    I then started happily deploying the image and realised after getting to the magic 25 that my KMS server was stuck on one.

    A reasonable bit of googling lead me to the horrible truth.

    It appears that somehow I broke things by shifting the .wims and rebuilding the image.

    I've tried the rearm trick, but that hasn't worked.

    I've tried the sysprep /generalize method, but thats erroring out. Looking at the sysprep log I can see that the rearm count is exceeded.

    I've tried doing a repair install on a machine in the hope that I can find a method that doesn't involve me having to reimage the computers.

    Its bad enough that I have to rebuild the image, but I've 25 machines that I'd prefer not to have to reimage.

    Is there a way to get windows 7 to change its cmid other than reimaging it?

    BTW, the first school that i built the image at has deployed very nicely, KMS is happy, windows happily authenticating.

    • Edited by mattstarczak Thursday, April 15, 2010 5:04 AM Clarifying
    Thursday, April 15, 2010 5:02 AM

Answers

  • After you exhaust your rearm count (three rearms) you can no longer perform further rearms.

    Sysprep /generalize will also show error.

    The best approach is to start with a new image.

    If you plan to perform sysprep /generalize for more than three times, you should run sysprep with unattend.xml answer file, for example:

    sysprep /generalize /oobe /unattend:F:\unattend.xml

    unattend.xml should contain:

    <settings pass="generalize">
      <component name="Microsoft-Windows-Security-SPP">
        <SkipRearm>1</SkipRearm>
      </component>
    ...

    Thursday, April 15, 2010 3:17 PM

All replies

  • After you exhaust your rearm count (three rearms) you can no longer perform further rearms.

    Sysprep /generalize will also show error.

    The best approach is to start with a new image.

    If you plan to perform sysprep /generalize for more than three times, you should run sysprep with unattend.xml answer file, for example:

    sysprep /generalize /oobe /unattend:F:\unattend.xml

    unattend.xml should contain:

    <settings pass="generalize">
      <component name="Microsoft-Windows-Security-SPP">
        <SkipRearm>1</SkipRearm>
      </component>
    ...

    Thursday, April 15, 2010 3:17 PM
  • Does anyone know what the logic was behind crippling this function? It seems like, with the use of the skiprearm flag, there is no real benefit to Microsoft and it is clearly a detriment to we the techs who missed that flag in our planning.
    Friday, June 24, 2011 3:46 PM
  • Exactly! On two occasions now a tech forgot to take into account the skip rearm and we ended up blowing away two solid days worth of work building a custom 90GB engineering template. Really frustrating given it's completely bypass-able if you DO take it into account.


    • Edited by jlh.free Sunday, January 15, 2012 5:58 PM
    Sunday, January 15, 2012 5:58 PM