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NTFS file system folder mount point - do I need it?

    Question

  • hi everyone,

    I was cleaning files on a server and found a folder called mount, it is a few years old but looks like it replicated the c:\ drive at some point.

    when I tried to remove access was denied, error was you require permission from trusted installer to make changes to this folder. 

    I am concerned if I try to force a deletion the server might not boot. 

    can anyone suggest a way to know if this folder is in current use for booting of the server?

    thanks in advance

    Friday, April 19, 2019 1:40 AM

Answers

  • I don't understand the concern about a link to the boot process.  Unless the boot process has been modified to reference it in some way, it is not going to impact it.  You could modify your boot to be verbose; that way you can see everything done during the boot to see if there is any reference to anything there, but it doesn't look like there is anything.

    As for the amount of data in that directory, look at it to see what it is.  When was it last accessed?  If it hasn't been accessed for months, then it is most likely not used.  Back it up before deleting it, if you want to.


    tim

    • Marked as answer by Marc Morris Sunday, April 21, 2019 11:52 PM
    Sunday, April 21, 2019 12:37 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    Thanks for posting in our forum!

    1. >> it is a few years old but looks like it replicated the c:\ drive at some point.

    Can you upload your screenshot about mount point?

    2. For more information about NTFS volume mount points, please visit:

    https://library.netapp.com/ecmdocs/ECMP1217281/html/GUID-C6537E25-1E71-40F8-A1AF-F0DEED4C865D.html

    Please Note: Since the web site is not hosted by Microsoft, the link may change without notice. Microsoft does not guarantee the accuracy of this information.

    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/storage/disk-management/assign-a-mount-point-folder-path-to-a-drive

    3. I tested it in my environment and I successfully deleted the mount point, so I think we can delete it if we have enough permissions. If you have concerns about the security of your system, I suggest you backup your system before deleting this mount point.

    Hope this information can help you, if you have any question, please feel free to let me know.

    Best Regards,

    Daniel


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    Friday, April 19, 2019 6:34 AM
    Moderator
  • thanks for the reply and suggestions Daniel.

    below is the  current windows dir and mount below it. does this shed any further light for you?

    thanks again 

    Marc

    Friday, April 19, 2019 10:26 AM
  • A mount point, in and of itself, it not necessarily a bad thing.  Mount points are generally created for some specific purpose, often for an application or utility.  Without documentation, it is pretty difficult to tell its purpose, but maybe listing out all the mount points will give you an idea of the application/utility using the mount point.  The following PowerShell script will provide some information about the mount points on your system.  Maybe it will help you determine if the application/utility is still in use.

    $TotalGB = @{Name="Capacity(GB)";expression={[math]::round(($_.Capacity/ 1073741824),2)}}
    $FreeGB = @{Name="FreeSpace(GB)";expression={[math]::round(($_.FreeSpace / 1073741824),2)}}
    $FreePerc = @{Name="Free(%)";expression={[math]::round(((($_.FreeSpace / 1073741824)/($_.Capacity / 1073741824)) * 100),0)}}
     
    function get-mountpoints {
    $volumes = Get-WmiObject win32_volume -Filter "DriveType='3'"
    $volumes | Select Name, Label, DriveLetter, FileSystem, $TotalGB, $FreeGB, $FreePerc | Format-Table -AutoSize
    }
     
    get-mountpoints
    
    

    If you can determine the application/utility is no longer in use, then you can obtain the proper privileges to delete the mount point and not be concerned about breaking something.  But, even if you can't, there is likely no harm in leaving the mount point there.


    tim

    Friday, April 19, 2019 1:06 PM
  • thanks Tim, the mount point looks like it is taking up 5 gig of space. that is the main reason I wanted to remove it. 

    I copied your script into a notepad and saved it as a .ps1 file and ran it and got nil results. see the attachment. 

    does this mean there are no mount points and the folder can be deleted safely once ownership and permissions have been granted?

    regards

    Marc

    Saturday, April 20, 2019 4:12 AM
  • Mount points are simply pointers.  I don't understand how it could be taking up 5 GB of space.  Maybe the content of the directory is taking up that much space, but it is not mount points taking up that much space.

    You didn't execute the script with what you posted.  Entering something within quotes like you did (".\mountpoint.ps1") is simply telling PowerShell to display the value you included within the quotes.  The proper way would have been to simply enter the string with no quotes.


    tim

    Saturday, April 20, 2019 1:24 PM
  • thanks for clarifying the running of the script, I have run it correctly now and it looks like the mount point I am concerned about does not exist. I am concerned about deleting the folder as it contains so much data and I am worried it is linked somehow to the boot up process. 

    here is another screenshot that I think might help. thanks again for your followup and suggestions. 

    Saturday, April 20, 2019 11:39 PM
  • I don't understand the concern about a link to the boot process.  Unless the boot process has been modified to reference it in some way, it is not going to impact it.  You could modify your boot to be verbose; that way you can see everything done during the boot to see if there is any reference to anything there, but it doesn't look like there is anything.

    As for the amount of data in that directory, look at it to see what it is.  When was it last accessed?  If it hasn't been accessed for months, then it is most likely not used.  Back it up before deleting it, if you want to.


    tim

    • Marked as answer by Marc Morris Sunday, April 21, 2019 11:52 PM
    Sunday, April 21, 2019 12:37 PM
  • thanks for the tip about the verbose boot.

    the last date accessed was 2013

    I guess it is ok to delete.

    thanks for your help.

    Sunday, April 21, 2019 11:53 PM
  • Nice to hear that!


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Monday, April 22, 2019 2:11 AM
    Moderator