none
wuauclt and other questions about WSUS RRS feed

  • Question

  • Fist and foremost, what use is wuauclt?  There seems to be a ton of missinformation out there on the command.  I have tried running it a number of ways and it never appears to do anything...

    Second, if i have a machine that has checked into the WSUS server and is added to the appropriate group, how can I force it to get the updates without waiting for the GP schedule?

    Third, once I initiate the above process, where can I go to see something is actually happening?  Event Viewer?

     

    Thanks!  I am really frustrated trying to navigate the WSUS environment!

    Wednesday, May 25, 2011 3:28 PM

Answers

  • Great, thanks!  It would be nice if the command line actually returned a message to let you know it was actually doing something... 

    It does! It's called the WindowsUpdate.log. :

    I literally just typed this: "wuauclt /khfkoshflkasfhklasjdfhkasdfkashvk" and it acted as though the command executed fine...

    I guess it's all a matter of perception. . . . when I don't get feedback from something, or someone -- I assume I'm being ignored. Such is the case here, as well -- your command was simply ignored (it was, after all, quite invalid). Remember.. this is not a consumer-level command . . . it's a tool,  presumably only used by qualified and experienced patch administrators, so the fact that the programmers did not write a lot of 'tell me when I did something pointless" code into the utility is a Good Thing, IMO.

    The command is documented in the WSUS Deployment Guide in Manipulate Client Behavior using Command-Line Options


    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP:EA, MCDBA, MCSA
    Principal/CTO, Onsite Technology Solutions, Houston, Texas
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2011)
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin
    My Blog: http://onsitechsolutions.spaces.live.com

    Thursday, May 26, 2011 8:43 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi there,

    When run from the command prompt on a client in the form of "wuauclt.exe /resetauthorization /detectnow", this command will kick off a manual check in with the configured WSUS server (or WindowsUpdate website, if you're using that instead of WSUS).  You can verify this occurs by opening the windowsupdate.log file located in the Windows directory.

    If you manually run wuauclt.exe with the above listed switches, it will check in with WSUS, and then behave based on your update configuration, either configured locally on each client, or through Group Policy.  So, if you have your clients configured to download any available updates, it will do so.  Or, if you have your clients configured to just check in and inform you there are updates without downloading, it will do that also.

    The windowsupdate.log file, located on the individual clients, will have all the information pertaining to how wuauclt runs on their individual systems.

    Hope that helps,

    John

    • Proposed as answer by John May Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:18 PM
    Wednesday, May 25, 2011 3:48 PM
  • Helped a lot.  Thanks!
    Wednesday, May 25, 2011 4:24 PM
  • Helped a lot.  Thanks!


    To expand on John's answer...

    There are three functional uses for the WUAUCLT.EXE command.

    1. wuauclt /detectnow  -- initiates a detection event to the assigned update services resource (AU or WSUS).

    2. wuauclt /resetauthorization /detectnow -- this is actually a special case version of the previous command. The /resetauthorization parameter forces the targeting cookie to be immediately expired. Normally the cookie has an ~60 minute expiration. Typically this form of the command is used when server-side targeting is being used, and a client system has just been reassigned to new group(s) via the WSUS console. Use of this command forces the WUAgent to discard any previously known group memberships and to requery the WSUS server for the current memberships. This command should also be used when the SusClientID has been deleted and a detection was performed within the previous hour to ensure the WUAgent does not use the SusClientID that is cached in the targeting cookie. Also note that the order of these parameters is critical -- the /resetauthorization flag must be the first of these flags on the command line.

    3. wuauclt /reportnow -- IF a recent event has completed and there are PENDING EVENTS to be reported to the WSUS server, this command will force the immediate flushing of that reporting event queue. If there are no pending events to be reported, this command does nothing.

    No other parameters are supported or documented -- although many are defined in the source code and have been extracted via reflection. Some of them have experimental functionality, but should not be used in a production environment.

     


    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP:EA, MCDBA, MCSA
    Principal/CTO, Onsite Technology Solutions, Houston, Texas
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2011)
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin
    My Blog: http://onsitechsolutions.spaces.live.com
    Wednesday, May 25, 2011 8:48 PM
    Moderator
  • Great, thanks!  It would be nice if the command line actually returned a message to let you know it was actually doing something...  I literally just typed this: "wuauclt /khfkoshflkasfhklasjdfhkasdfkashvk" and it acted as though the command executed fine...  wuauclt is a strange command...
    Thursday, May 26, 2011 3:25 PM
  • Great, thanks!  It would be nice if the command line actually returned a message to let you know it was actually doing something... 

    It does! It's called the WindowsUpdate.log. :

    I literally just typed this: "wuauclt /khfkoshflkasfhklasjdfhkasdfkashvk" and it acted as though the command executed fine...

    I guess it's all a matter of perception. . . . when I don't get feedback from something, or someone -- I assume I'm being ignored. Such is the case here, as well -- your command was simply ignored (it was, after all, quite invalid). Remember.. this is not a consumer-level command . . . it's a tool,  presumably only used by qualified and experienced patch administrators, so the fact that the programmers did not write a lot of 'tell me when I did something pointless" code into the utility is a Good Thing, IMO.

    The command is documented in the WSUS Deployment Guide in Manipulate Client Behavior using Command-Line Options


    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP:EA, MCDBA, MCSA
    Principal/CTO, Onsite Technology Solutions, Houston, Texas
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2011)
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin
    My Blog: http://onsitechsolutions.spaces.live.com

    Thursday, May 26, 2011 8:43 PM
    Moderator