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Why wouldn't ReadyBoost be enabled in Server 2008 R2?

    Question

  • If Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2 are from a common code base, why wouldn't ReadyBoost be enabled in Windows Server 2008 R2? 

    Is it because MS believes we all have our servers are overloaded with memory?  I was able to build my server with 4gb of memory, but now it has 12gb, which is more than it's currently using.  Still, when the server starts paging memory, wouldn't ReadyBoost help performance?


    - Michael Faklis
    Thursday, March 17, 2011 4:10 PM

Answers

  • Hello,

    Readyboost is made for workstations to have a temporary fix for RAM problems. On a server this is not builtin exact for that reason. Use real RAM instead.


    Best regards Meinolf Weber Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.
    • Proposed as answer by Mr XMVP Thursday, March 17, 2011 5:52 PM
    • Marked as answer by Tim QuanModerator Monday, March 21, 2011 3:25 AM
    Thursday, March 17, 2011 5:44 PM

All replies

  • Hello,

    Readyboost is made for workstations to have a temporary fix for RAM problems. On a server this is not builtin exact for that reason. Use real RAM instead.


    Best regards Meinolf Weber Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.
    • Proposed as answer by Mr XMVP Thursday, March 17, 2011 5:52 PM
    • Marked as answer by Tim QuanModerator Monday, March 21, 2011 3:25 AM
    Thursday, March 17, 2011 5:44 PM
  • Mr x

    Readyboost is NOT an alternative to RAM. The purpose of readyboost is to speed up boot times by storing small OS files in flash memory which has an insignificant seek time being solid state, unlike mechanical hard disks. RAM is faster but as it's volatile you can't boot from it. The swap file is an alternative to RAM but significantly slower.

    Carl Thompson

    Saturday, March 01, 2014 1:19 PM
  • Mr x

    Readyboost is NOT an alternative to RAM. The purpose of readyboost is to speed up boot times by storing small OS files in flash memory which has an insignificant seek time being solid state, unlike mechanical hard disks. RAM is faster but as it's volatile you can't boot from it. The swap file is an alternative to RAM but significantly slower.

    Carl Thompson

    I hate to revive such an old thread, but there's a lot of misinformation out there about ReadyBoost. It's been a while since I've done serious research on the subject, but I'll throw a few things out there for future readers to consider if they come to this predicament.

    ReadyBoost stores data that is prioritized by system services into encrypted sections of high-speed (low access times) media as a second location to pull data from (though I don't believe it can pull a given set of data from both the internal hard drive and ReadyBoost -- the operating system picks one as needed). For this purpose, even a USB 2.0 drive that has lower total throughput than your spinning disk can be used for a substantial impact on performance. It commonly makes a huge difference in systems that don't have a large volume of memory.

    ReadyBoost does not help with boot times. Before the system has loaded the services it uses, the USB drive is not recognized for reading data by the operating system. Also, the information on the flash drive is encrypted in a session that is wiped out on boot. There's no way for the OS to pull useful information from the drive to speed up the boot process.

    The short of it: ReadyBoost is considered a consumer-grade, not server-grade, technology, so it is not available in server operating systems. It is used to help some machines that are below their optimal volume of system memory stay reasonably productive with a relatively small investment. Users will commonly see some time period of slow performance after boot 'till the cache is rebuilt. It does not help boot times at all.

    Some decent community-provided information,  compiled by someone who has invested a fair amount of effort:

    http://superuser.com/questions/178386/how-to-stop-readyboost-from-rebuilding-cache-after-every-restart-on-sd-cards-and

    • Edited by 283741817213 Monday, April 13, 2015 8:49 PM Added URL at SU's website
    Monday, April 13, 2015 8:41 PM