none
Hyper-V 2012 Cluster / Flex-10 RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hey all!

    So I'm in the process of deploying the first Hyper-V (2012) cluster to compare against our vSphere infrastructure and possibly migrate to Hyper-V.

    The 2 Hyper-V hosts are sitting on 2 BL460G8 blades w/ an extra Flex10 Mezz card in each (4 10GB ports in each blade), and this moves back to 2 Flex-10 modules on the back side of a C3000 enclosure.

    Some of the bandwidth for the two hosts is dedicated to iSCSI HBA's. I'm curious how some of you would carve out the rest of the bandwidth. If we do migrate to Hyper-V, this will turn into a 8 node Hyper-V cluster. I will have Live Migration and CSV enabled for this cluster as well. I've had a lot of trouble finding any kind of implementation or recommendation for Flex-10 deployments.

    What I'm thinking so far is:

    • Management Team - 1Gb
    • Cluster Team - 1Gb
    • Live Migration Team - 4Gb
    • CSV Team - 4Gb
    • VM Team - 14Gb

    What I'm curious about is, should I merge Cluster, Live Migration, and CSV together for 9Gb or maybe just CSV and Live Migration or just leave it all alone.

    Does anyone that has done a Hyper-V 08 R2 (or newer) deployment on Flex-10 gear have any recommendations?

    Thursday, October 25, 2012 3:10 PM

Answers

  • On 2012 your primary bandwidth would go to the vSwitch(es) for your VMs.

    Your next priority would be Live Migration.

    As I understand it there is no longer a need to split off the various networking duties but finding the references (I heard them in person) is a bit difficult at this time.

    A good reference though:


    Philip Elder SBS MVP Blog: http://blog.mpecsinc.ca

    Thursday, October 25, 2012 4:02 PM
  • Hi,

    Below information may also useful for you:

    Live migrations are now (in Windows Server 2012) able to utilize higher network bandwidths (up to 10 Gigabit) to complete migrations faster.

    Use of a private network is recommended for live migration network traffic.

    When performing a live migration of a virtual machine between two computers with no shared infrastructure, the first thing that Hyper-V does is perform a partial migration of the virtual machines storage, as follows:

    1. Throughout most of the move operation, disk reads and writes go to the source virtual hard disk.
    2. While reads and writes occur on the source virtual hard disk, the disk contents are copied over the network to the new destination virtual hard disk.
    3. After the initial disk copy is complete, disk writes are mirrored to both the source and destination virtual hard disks while outstanding disk changes are replicated.
    4. After the source and destination virtual hard disks are completely synchronized, the virtual machine live migration is initiated, following the same process that is used for live migration with shared storage.
    5. Once the live migration is complete and the virtual machine is successfully running on the destination server, the files on the source server are deleted.

    For more information please refer to following MS articles:

    Virtual Machine Live Migration Overview
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh831435.aspx
    6 Best Practices for Physical Servers Hosting Hyper-V Roles
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd744830.aspx

    Lawrence

    TechNet Community Support

    Friday, October 26, 2012 7:14 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • On 2012 your primary bandwidth would go to the vSwitch(es) for your VMs.

    Your next priority would be Live Migration.

    As I understand it there is no longer a need to split off the various networking duties but finding the references (I heard them in person) is a bit difficult at this time.

    A good reference though:


    Philip Elder SBS MVP Blog: http://blog.mpecsinc.ca

    Thursday, October 25, 2012 4:02 PM
  • Thanks Philip!

    I seem to find information about the individual technologies all over the palce but I haven't seen anything yet that puts it all together coherently.

    This seems to be the best I've found:

    Thursday, October 25, 2012 5:42 PM
  • Hi,

    Below information may also useful for you:

    Live migrations are now (in Windows Server 2012) able to utilize higher network bandwidths (up to 10 Gigabit) to complete migrations faster.

    Use of a private network is recommended for live migration network traffic.

    When performing a live migration of a virtual machine between two computers with no shared infrastructure, the first thing that Hyper-V does is perform a partial migration of the virtual machines storage, as follows:

    1. Throughout most of the move operation, disk reads and writes go to the source virtual hard disk.
    2. While reads and writes occur on the source virtual hard disk, the disk contents are copied over the network to the new destination virtual hard disk.
    3. After the initial disk copy is complete, disk writes are mirrored to both the source and destination virtual hard disks while outstanding disk changes are replicated.
    4. After the source and destination virtual hard disks are completely synchronized, the virtual machine live migration is initiated, following the same process that is used for live migration with shared storage.
    5. Once the live migration is complete and the virtual machine is successfully running on the destination server, the files on the source server are deleted.

    For more information please refer to following MS articles:

    Virtual Machine Live Migration Overview
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh831435.aspx
    6 Best Practices for Physical Servers Hosting Hyper-V Roles
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd744830.aspx

    Lawrence

    TechNet Community Support

    Friday, October 26, 2012 7:14 AM
    Moderator
  • In short with 2012 Server you virtualize all networks and connect them to a team through a vSwitch.

    I would suggest providing 2 x 10GbE NICs to each Hyper-V server and configuring as follows:

    1 x Team (powershell new-netlbfoteam) encompassing the 2 x 10GbE NICs

    Create a vSwitch (Powershell add-vmswitch) and attach it to your team

    Create virtual adapters for Mgmt/Cluster/LM (powershell - add-vmnetworkadapter)

    VM NICs connect directly into your vmSwitch

    The result is that all connections have been virtualized, they all have access to at least 10GbE of bandwidth (single connection technologies like Live migration will perform better - move to SMB3 storage and Live Migration is multichannel!).

    Using the minimumbandwidthweight cmdlet allows you to apply QoS to your VMNetworkadapters and prioritize traffic for any management or VM Guest NICs as required.

    Good luck!

    Dave

    Thursday, August 15, 2013 8:07 AM