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Sharing Remote Session with Interactive user

    Question

  • Is there any way in Windows Server 2008 to share a remote session with the current desktop user (the local interactive user who is logged in at the keyboard).  I don't want the local user to get booted off, I want to share his session.

     

    i.e. is there anything in Windows 2008 Server that can act like pcanywhere, or radmin, vnc, etc.  (esp now that the console switch has been removed from RDP).

     

     

    Sunday, November 11, 2007 2:57 AM

Answers

  • Drew,

     

    Thanks.  Actually, your directions for removing the user's prompts weren't quite perfect, but got me to the right place--and this is not perfect either (windows 2003 is slightly different), but close enough.

     

    Manuel

     

    This article is from Microsoft Knowledge base article 292190

    The information in this article applies to:
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition
    This article was previously published under Q292190

    SUMMARY

    This article describes how to shadow a Terminal Server session without a prompt for approval.

    MORE INFORMATION

    If you would like to shadow the Terminal Server console (session 0) in a Terminal Server session, and you do not want to be prompted for permission, set the local Group Policy on the server that is running Terminal Services.

    To shadow other sessions, on the RDP-TCP Properties dialog box, on the Remote Control tab, click to clear the require users permission check box. This does not affect the console session.

    To remote control the console with no prompt for approval:
    1. Open Group Policy Editor (Gpedit.msc) on the server that is running Terminal services.
    2. Under Computer Configuration, expand Administrative templates, expand Windows Components, and then click Terminal Services.
    3. Right-click Remote Control Settings, and then click Properties.
    4. Select the Enabled option.
    5. Under Options, click Full Control without user`s permission.
    6. Click OK, and then quit Group Policy Editor.
    To update the local policy immediately afterward, go to a command prompt and run the following command:

    gpupdate /force

    Now, if you establish a Remote Desktop session you can connect to the console and remote control it by going to a command prompt and using the following command:

    Shadow 0

    You should not be prompted on the console for permission. For additional information, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 186556 Terminal Server Commands: SHADOW

     

    Thursday, November 15, 2007 8:54 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

     

    It sounds like you're looking to shadow a specific user's session, I don't have any specific documentation on shadow in 2008, but the same functionality was available in 2003 and hasn't really changed much.  http://support.microsoft.com/kb/278845

     

    To do this, you'll need to change some server settings to allow remote control, you can decide whether or not you want the user to be prompted before an admin can start shadowing the user's session: http://www.jsifaq.com/SF/Tips/Tip.aspx?id=6750

     

    As you mentioned, since is no longer a 'console' session, you'll need to find out which session you want to shadow through some tool (qwinsta.exe, admin tools, taskmgr, etc.) and shadow that particular session.  (shadow.exe <sessionid>)

     

    Drew

     

    Wednesday, November 14, 2007 4:30 PM
    Owner
  • Drew,

     

    Thanks.  Actually, your directions for removing the user's prompts weren't quite perfect, but got me to the right place--and this is not perfect either (windows 2003 is slightly different), but close enough.

     

    Manuel

     

    This article is from Microsoft Knowledge base article 292190

    The information in this article applies to:
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition
    This article was previously published under Q292190

    SUMMARY

    This article describes how to shadow a Terminal Server session without a prompt for approval.

    MORE INFORMATION

    If you would like to shadow the Terminal Server console (session 0) in a Terminal Server session, and you do not want to be prompted for permission, set the local Group Policy on the server that is running Terminal Services.

    To shadow other sessions, on the RDP-TCP Properties dialog box, on the Remote Control tab, click to clear the require users permission check box. This does not affect the console session.

    To remote control the console with no prompt for approval:
    1. Open Group Policy Editor (Gpedit.msc) on the server that is running Terminal services.
    2. Under Computer Configuration, expand Administrative templates, expand Windows Components, and then click Terminal Services.
    3. Right-click Remote Control Settings, and then click Properties.
    4. Select the Enabled option.
    5. Under Options, click Full Control without user`s permission.
    6. Click OK, and then quit Group Policy Editor.
    To update the local policy immediately afterward, go to a command prompt and run the following command:

    gpupdate /force

    Now, if you establish a Remote Desktop session you can connect to the console and remote control it by going to a command prompt and using the following command:

    Shadow 0

    You should not be prompted on the console for permission. For additional information, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 186556 Terminal Server Commands: SHADOW

     

    Thursday, November 15, 2007 8:54 AM
  • All the above is for Server 2003, not Server 2008 which represents a change in Microsoft's thinking. 

    I finally figured out how to bypass the remote control request prompt for approval in Server 2008.  Even Microsoft support KB947723 wasn't even that clear.  It's all in Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Terminal Services\Terminal Server\Connections\Set rules for remote control of Terminal Services user sessions node of the Local Group Policy Editor.  Once that is enabled, you can choose from options to:
    No remote control allowed
    Full Control with user's permission
    Full Control without user's permission
    View Session with user's permission
    View Session without user's permission.

    And so, to by pass the prompt in the console session, set Options to "Full control without user's permission", and voila.

    More detail info at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/947723

     

    Thursday, November 25, 2010 1:32 AM