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PING: transmit failed. error code 1231. RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a HyperV environment I just set up on my laptop. Within HyperV's Virtual Network Manager, I have created 3 network connections, 1 External, 1 Internal with no VLAN ID, and an Internal with VLAN ID = 2.

    I have a VM with network adapter set to the external connector. (I've tried the internal connectors, too).

    If I ping any IP, I get this result:
    PING: transmit failed, error code 1231.

    Host Networking Configuration
    LAN connection
    * Microsoft Virtual Network Switch Protocol
    * Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4)

    On the Sharing Tab
    * Allow other network users to connect...
    connection: Local Area Connection 3
     (Local Area Connection 3 is the virtual adapter for the External connector.)

    I've also tried with Sharing unchecked.

    What am I missing?

    Thanks!

    David
    SharePoint Developer
    Tuesday, March 17, 2009 3:01 PM

Answers

  • In a nutshell - you have broken your Virtual Network.

    When using an External Virtual Network - do not assign an IP to the physical NIC (in Network Connections).

    Here is what happens.

    When an External Virtual Network is created - Hyper-V inserts a virtual switch in between the physical NIC and your parent partition.  The Parent partition is then given a new Virtual NIC so that is can still get traffic out the port.
    the External Network switch allows traffic to exit the physical PC.

    If you create a virtual network (any type) and set a VLAN Tag within the properties of the Virtual Network - this actually sets the VLAN tag on the Parent partition traffic that passes on that virtual network - this does not apply to the guests.

    If you are running wireless on your laptop and what the VMs to share in the external network traffic, then the process is totally different. 
    John Paul Cook has that spelled out here:
    http://sqlblog.com/blogs/john_paul_cook/archive/2008/03/23/using-wireless-with-hyper-v.aspx

    This is what I am extrapolating that you are attempting to do.




    Brian Ehlert (hopefully you have found this useful)
    • Marked as answer by MossDev Tuesday, March 17, 2009 6:23 PM
    Tuesday, March 17, 2009 4:18 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • In a nutshell - you have broken your Virtual Network.

    When using an External Virtual Network - do not assign an IP to the physical NIC (in Network Connections).

    Here is what happens.

    When an External Virtual Network is created - Hyper-V inserts a virtual switch in between the physical NIC and your parent partition.  The Parent partition is then given a new Virtual NIC so that is can still get traffic out the port.
    the External Network switch allows traffic to exit the physical PC.

    If you create a virtual network (any type) and set a VLAN Tag within the properties of the Virtual Network - this actually sets the VLAN tag on the Parent partition traffic that passes on that virtual network - this does not apply to the guests.

    If you are running wireless on your laptop and what the VMs to share in the external network traffic, then the process is totally different. 
    John Paul Cook has that spelled out here:
    http://sqlblog.com/blogs/john_paul_cook/archive/2008/03/23/using-wireless-with-hyper-v.aspx

    This is what I am extrapolating that you are attempting to do.




    Brian Ehlert (hopefully you have found this useful)
    • Marked as answer by MossDev Tuesday, March 17, 2009 6:23 PM
    Tuesday, March 17, 2009 4:18 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks Brian.

    So I started over. That does answer the immediate question. I'll mark that as the answer.

    So, a followup question.

    When my laptop is at work, I'm on their network. However, my machine isn't attached to their domain. What I'd like to do is have these VM's be their own network. That's why I went down the route of the VLAN ID thing. At least with it enabled, my VMs could ping eachother when I'm not of their network.

    So, when I'm at home and therefore not attached to their network, I'd still like to have all the VMs on the same virtual domain, call it moss.com.

    Is this possible with a secondary network adapter that is Private? Should I still stay away from VLAN IDs?

    David

    PS - sure, I'd like to use wireless at home. But I'll wait to tackle that later.


    SharePoint Developer
    Tuesday, March 17, 2009 6:23 PM
  • Okay..

    VMs can communicate with each other on any of the three virtual network types.

    External = VMs + Host = traffic can leave the PC
    Internal = VMs + Host = traffic is local to the PC
    Private  = VMs only = traffic is local to the PC.

    The fact that the Server 2008 ooperating system that you interact with at the consle is not joined to the domain has no impact on the network connectivity of the VMs.

    To simplify this - lets forget wireless and just think about a wired LAN connection.

    Physical switch -> wall plate -> patch cable -> physical PC NIC -> External Virtual Network -> Host (WS08 Parent partition)
                                                                                                                                                   -> VM1
                                                                                                                                                   -> VM2

    It is where you get your IP address from that matters.

    If your VMs DHCP from the corporate network, they will be on it, regardless of their domain menbership.
    If your VMs DHCP from your home network, they will be on it, again - regardless of any domain membership.

    The problems that you run into with moving private domains around, is IP addressing and DNS.
    You move your DC from network A to B - the DHCP addressing sceme is different, thus the VMs and the DC get new IP addresses and a new DNS server from DHCP and they can no longer find each other and the test environment crumbles.

    There is no reall automatic way to get this all working really well - it requires some manual intervention to update the DNS pointer (that is the key).

    I get around this by building myself a test Domain Controller, I add DNS.
    My VMs are allowed to DHCP from anywhere, but I manually set the DNS settings and put my private DNS server as the first one (and I may need to add a second depending on what I want to do) and the one from DHCP as the second one.

    Then I reboot the VM to allow everything to update cleanly.

    Yes, not 100% portable.  But all I require is one NIC on my Hyper-V host with an External Virtual Network.

    If you want to get really fancy, you use an internal network with all the VMs - then an ISA VM (old product name, I know - proxy server) that bridges the Internal virtual network with the external virtual network and let the proxy server do the translation work.
    But then, you need to know ISA to get everything right - depending on what you want to do.

    Could you follow all that? (I have to ask to make sure that I didn't dump too much info and cause confusion).


    Brian Ehlert (hopefully you have found this useful)
    Tuesday, March 17, 2009 9:18 PM
    Moderator