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Whose dumb idea was it to put the Metro UI on Server 2012? RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • How utterly ridiculous this is. Giant step backward.

    I do not need "apps" or a tablet user interface running on my servers. My god this is terrible, and I hope it's removed before RTM...

    Wednesday, July 11, 2012 6:25 PM

All replies

  • And how do you disable it in the RC?
    Wednesday, July 11, 2012 6:28 PM
  • I think you are looking this information : http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/quickly-easily-disable-metro-user-interface-windows-8/

    it works with Windows 8 and I'm pretty sure it works with Windows Server 2012. I will try tomorrow


    Arnaud Buonaccorsi - GSX Corp
    http://www.buenoflex.com
    http://www.gsx.com <= The monitoring solution for Exchange and Sharepoint



    • Edited by buenoflex Wednesday, July 11, 2012 8:25 PM
    Wednesday, July 11, 2012 8:23 PM
  • Hello,

    About 1 month ago, I downloaded the free ebook "Introducing Windows Server 2012". In this book, I got some ideas from Corey hynes's article, "Managing servers without the Metro start menu". It just makes me to think this "dumb idea" from another side.

    Here is the link for the free ebook, I hope it help to you to understand the "dumb idea".

    Free ebook: Introducing Windows Server 2012
    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/microsoft_press/archive/2012/06/04/free-ebook-introducing-windows-server-2012.aspx

    Keywords for search: Managing servers without the Metro start menu

    Personaly speaking, I think it will take some time for me to understand this "dumb idea".

    Best Regards,
    Huajun Gu


    After I watched the video "Richard St. John's 8 secrets of success" on TED.com, I learned this: "Being good at your job is not enough, you should be damn good at it."


    Thursday, July 12, 2012 12:52 AM
  • Yeah, I think we need to go back to Hollerith cards for input.  Or better yet, let's just use the switches on the console to enter hex characters.  This idea of changing the user interface every few years has got to stop.  Real engineers like to stay, close to the machine.  I've had to move from switches to cards or paper tape to electric typewriters, to CRTs, to GUIs.  And with GUIs it became hopeless.  Everyone thought they had a better idea, so I have lost track of how many different GUIs I have had to endure.  Why, oh why does technology have to keep changing?  The slide rule still works great; who needs a computer for calculations?

    Time to remove my tongue from my cheek. <grin>


    tim

    Thursday, July 12, 2012 7:57 PM
  • Yeah, I think we need to go back to Hollerith cards for input.  Or better yet, let's just use the switches on the console to enter hex characters.  This idea of changing the user interface every few years has got to stop.  Real engineers like to stay, close to the machine.  I've had to move from switches to cards or paper tape to electric typewriters, to CRTs, to GUIs.  And with GUIs it became hopeless.  Everyone thought they had a better idea, so I have lost track of how many different GUIs I have had to endure.  Why, oh why does technology have to keep changing?  The slide rule still works great; who needs a computer for calculations?

    Time to remove my tongue from my cheek. <grin>


    tim

    The change from cards to command line and then to a basic gui, while a fundamental change, actually made our jobs easier to some degree. And the fact the MS seems to be in love with Powershell makes that functionality available to those of us who like to go that route.

    And the Windows 95/NT/2003 interface was actually intuitive, 2008, while it was a change, was at least usable.

    This new Metro UI business is a steamy pile of horse dung that has no place on a server. It's a server, not a tablet. We are professionals, not 14 year old kids with mom's iPad.

    Getting back to UI changes, we went through a pretty significant UI change from NT3.5 to NT4... a positive change. The UI was much easier to use. From NT4 to 2000, again, a big change, but we gained quite a bit of functionality. 2000 to 2003 was virtually no change from a UI perspective. 2008 was another big change, however at that point, it was counterproductive. We had to re-learn "where stuff was", what went where. It was a square peg in a round hole, but once you got used to it, you could at least use it. This 2012, I am flabbergasted. Like someone else said in another thread about "Where is the shutdown button", someone said, and I thought it was perfect "this highlights one of the things that is is so fundamentally flawed with this UI".

    I think Windows 8 is going to go over about as well as Vista did. Thank god we dont have to use the console on a server too often.

    Monday, July 16, 2012 7:37 PM
  • I think you are looking this information : http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/quickly-easily-disable-metro-user-interface-windows-8/

    it works with Windows 8 and I'm pretty sure it works with Windows Server 2012. I will try tomorrow


    Arnaud Buonaccorsi - GSX Corp
    http://www.buenoflex.com
    http://www.gsx.com <= The monitoring solution for Exchange and Sharepoint



    Thank you I will try that.

    EDIT: does not work.
    • Edited by Troy12n Monday, July 16, 2012 9:08 PM
    Monday, July 16, 2012 7:50 PM
  • This new Metro UI business is a steamy pile of horse dung that has no place on a server. It's a server, not a tablet. We are professionals, not 14 year old kids with mom's iPad.

    I remember similar complaints when WindowsNT came along: "A server with a GUI, what a crime. We don't want a freakin' GUI on a server!". It's the same every time the GUI changes. The Windowsxp/2003 interface may be intuitive now, but when it was introduced there was again an outcry about the new bloated interface, and that the old Win9x/NT/2k interface was so much better (it wasn't). It's remarkable that in an industry where change is a natural property many people are so reluctant and inflexible.

    Oh, and I guess probably only 14 year old kids believe that using a non-graphical interface is a distinction of a professional. It isn't. In fact, the choice of administration interface is utterly irrelevant. Even more, a real IT professional would very likely be a bit more open minded and give new things a try without prejudice. And then use what fits him best.

    Metro is certainly a change but after using (I mean really using) it I have to say I really like it. Yes, on a non-touch desktop monitor. I admit that I didn't expect to like it but I do. And at least in my environment I mostly get similar reactions from others. 

    And if you don't like it then don't use it. As you say there are other ways to admin Server 2012.


    • Edited by ZeroSugar Tuesday, July 24, 2012 8:17 PM
    Tuesday, July 24, 2012 8:15 PM
  • As many others I fell your pain... I am not necessarily against UI change but the ~Metro (non-Metro) UI is, in my humble opinion, not really suited to server management. At the end of the day it is mostly a touch screen thing... and it really lacks discoverability. To impose it on the desktop is a big gambit but to force it on IT staff is really suicidal in my book.

    Thursday, September 6, 2012 7:53 AM
  • All the MMC snap-ins and management interfaces are still there. It's really just the launcher interface that has changed. You can even pin all your management tools to the Start screen and have 1-click access to them.
    Thursday, September 6, 2012 8:34 AM
  • Guess no one listened
    Thursday, September 6, 2012 8:17 PM
  • For this release, it's pretty much a done deal. Sorry :-(
    Thursday, September 6, 2012 9:02 PM
  • I guess sales figures will be the ultimate answer. No way Server 2012 comes into our data centers for the foreseeable future.
    Thursday, September 6, 2012 9:31 PM
  • Ben,

    Have you or anyone else at Microsoft actually tried using this new interface on a server the way things are done in a real-world datacenter?  I connect to all of my servers using RDP with several open at one time, so they are not full-screen or I use VM tools which do not allow for full-screen.  Go ahead and try this out.  Try hovering and clicking in the corner when it is not the physical corner of a monitor.  This is a major design flaw for the server UI.  I've had to tell my CIO that we can't move our servers to Windows 2012 when we install SQL 2012 and TFS 2012, and eventually SharePoint 2013 because of this one simple UI design flaw.  While I've found the UI to be acceptable on a laptop or desktop, it's simply unusable on a server.

    And the executives are already not happy with Microsoft because some sales guy tried to push Lync at a SharePoint demo even after the sales guy was told don't mention it because they just dropped major money on new Cisco IP phones.  These kinds of things never happened when Bill Gates was still around.  Even Ballmer used to get it - http://www.ntk.net/media/developers.mpg - even if he did have a little to much coffee.  Did someone finally lock Raymond Chen in a closet and throw away the key?

    Seriously, someone needs to get this fixed quickly, and Sinofsky needs to get SP1 out the door quickly with the old Aero UI included.  The one thing that i could always count on from Microsoft was backwards compatibility.  Things got a little shaky with the change to .NET, but not like this.  My servers are not tablets and they never will be.  Same thing for developer laptops.  Apple and Google understand this, why not Microsoft?  Thanks in advance for fixing this design flaw quickly.

    Friday, September 7, 2012 8:38 PM
  • //My servers are not tablets and they never will be.//

    Yes!

    Metro UI on Server 2012 - it's very bad idea, i need style like ''server'', not like ''tablets''.

    Tuesday, September 11, 2012 8:56 PM
  • Your wish is granted!

    Yes, change is harder for some that for others.  At first I was not too happy with the change, but now that I have starting finding out the power that is available with Server Manager, the tiled interface has become very little of an issue.  If you want to treat like a 'real server', install it without the GUI and put RSAT on Windows 8.  Once you start using the Server Manager and PowerShell as they are meant to be used, you soon hardly notice the tiles.  And, just like with 2008, I got so used to clicking Start and typing in a search string that I nearly forgot where everything was in the Start menu.  Same capability exists in 2012.  Only, instead of clicking Start (or typing the Windows key) and typing in the search string, simply type Windows key + Q and start typing the search string.  I almost never use the tiles anymore.


    tim

    Tuesday, September 11, 2012 11:17 PM
  • I haven't something wrong about powershell, but GUI is more informative. But METRO is ******* GUI, it's good for touch tablets, but for servers? It's so wrong, that for administration we wanna "old" interface? It's so hard to make option, that can disable Metro?

    Thursday, September 27, 2012 6:38 AM
  • You can also use Minimal Server Interface if you want to remove the shell altogether.  You can then manage the machine via GUI (if you'd like to) using Server Manager or RSAT tools from a Windows 8 client.

    Information about what you can do in this interface is located here: http://blogs.technet.com/b/server-cloud/archive/2012/01/11/windows-server-8-server-applications-and-the-minimal-server-interface.aspx

    Information on how to enable it is here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh831786.aspx

    And you can always check out my blog regarding this option and role persistence considerations: http://blogs.technet.com/b/joscon/archive/2012/08/20/understanding-features-on-demand-and-role-persistence-in-windows-server-2012.aspx


    --Joseph [MSFT] http://blogs.technet.com/b/joscon/

    Thursday, September 27, 2012 3:09 PM
  • You can also use Minimal Server Interface if you want to remove the shell altogether.  You can then manage the machine via GUI (if you'd like to) using Server Manager or RSAT tools from a Windows 8 client.

    Information about what you can do in this interface is located here: http://blogs.technet.com/b/server-cloud/archive/2012/01/11/windows-server-8-server-applications-and-the-minimal-server-interface.aspx

    Information on how to enable it is here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh831786.aspx

    And you can always check out my blog regarding this option and role persistence considerations: http://blogs.technet.com/b/joscon/archive/2012/08/20/understanding-features-on-demand-and-role-persistence-in-windows-server-2012.aspx


    --Joseph [MSFT] http://blogs.technet.com/b/joscon/

    Or better yet, just give us the ability to disable Metro. Problem solved without wonky remote "Windows 8"-only client based solutions.

    What is this NetWare all over again where we have to manage our servers via remote tools? I swear this was called "Windows Server 2012" and not "PowerShell Server 2012", "Tablet Server 2012" or "Remote-managed-only Server 2012". Perhaps Microsoft just needs to ditch the "Windows" name if we aren't going to be running the windows GUI anymore.

    Thursday, September 27, 2012 6:00 PM
  • And you still have those options.  The default installation type for Server 2012 is actually Server Core and not the Gui version of the operating system.  So you have three options:

    • No shell = Server Core
    • Minimal shell = Minimal User Interface
    • "Full" shell = Server with Gui

    You don't have to use Windows 8's "wonky" client based tools, you can use a full gui version of Server to manage your environment as well if you like, I was just giving out the options.  As Tim said earlier, use the new interface, you might find that its not as bad as you think (and if it is, now you know you can always remove it :)


    --Joseph [MSFT] http://blogs.technet.com/b/joscon/

    Thursday, September 27, 2012 6:46 PM
  • Ben,

    Have you or anyone else at Microsoft actually tried using this new interface on a server the way things are done in a real-world datacenter?  I connect to all of my servers using RDP with several open at one time, so they are not full-screen or I use VM tools which do not allow for full-screen.  Go ahead and try this out.  Try hovering and clicking in the corner when it is not the physical corner of a monitor.  This is a major design flaw for the server UI.  I've had to tell my CIO that we can't move our servers to Windows 2012 when we install SQL 2012 and TFS 2012, and eventually SharePoint 2013 because of this one simple UI design flaw.  While I've found the UI to be acceptable on a laptop or desktop, it's simply unusable on a server.

    And the executives are already not happy with Microsoft because some sales guy tried to push Lync at a SharePoint demo even after the sales guy was told don't mention it because they just dropped major money on new Cisco IP phones.  These kinds of things never happened when Bill Gates was still around.  Even Ballmer used to get it - http://www.ntk.net/media/developers.mpg - even if he did have a little to much coffee.  Did someone finally lock Raymond Chen in a closet and throw away the key?

    Seriously, someone needs to get this fixed quickly, and Sinofsky needs to get SP1 out the door quickly with the old Aero UI included.  The one thing that i could always count on from Microsoft was backwards compatibility.  Things got a little shaky with the change to .NET, but not like this.  My servers are not tablets and they never will be.  Same thing for developer laptops.  Apple and Google understand this, why not Microsoft?  Thanks in advance for fixing this design flaw quickly.

    spot on josh.perry... we just started moving to server 2012 in our datacenters and trying to get that damn "metro start" button inside a non-full screen RDP session is almost impossible. And trying to shut down, logoff, restart, same, going to the right side of the screen. in what should have been a 30 minute setup for prerequisites, it took almost an hour just dragging the mouse trying to get the popup.. I kept having to go full screen just to use my windows key. still trying to find out if i can make a shortcut to the "metro" interface and stick that where the start menu used to be. There are apps that will bring back the start button, but the fact that i should have to install that on a production server is ridiculous. 
    Friday, September 28, 2012 10:24 PM
  • And you still have those options.  The default installation type for Server 2012 is actually Server Core and not the Gui version of the operating system.  So you have three options:

    • No shell = Server Core
    • Minimal shell = Minimal User Interface
    • "Full" shell = Server with Gui

    You don't have to use Windows 8's "wonky" client based tools, you can use a full gui version of Server to manage your environment as well if you like, I was just giving out the options.  As Tim said earlier, use the new interface, you might find that its not as bad as you think (and if it is, now you know you can always remove it :)


    --Joseph [MSFT] http://blogs.technet.com/b/joscon/

    Better yet, just remove the Metro UI from server. Problem solved. Everyone is happy.

    That would also save the server team thousands and thousands of hours wasted on implementing it, allow them to focus on improving the current features (like implementing a good reporting system for claims), reduce the image footprint, solve the remote problems, speed everything up even more, reduce attack footprints, etc.

    There are LOTS of benefits to removing it. There are little or no benefits to keeping it. Just remove it.


    • Edited by ABCFED Saturday, September 29, 2012 2:30 PM
    Saturday, September 29, 2012 2:25 PM
  • I think the fact that only 22% of pro-Windows fans currently like Metro really says it all. On the flip side, 78% of users do not want Metro on the desktop. I can imagine that number would certainly be much higher on the server side of things....probably 90%+ of admins really don't want it. It consumes server resources. It is a pain to take the extra step to run a "Minimal User Interface" as that's not selectable as a default installation option. It causes problems for deployments. Nobody wants to retrain their admins in Metro stupidity.

    http://www.zdnet.com/even-windows-8-early-adopters-prefer-windows-7-by-two-to-one-7000004927/

    • Edited by SAS71 Saturday, September 29, 2012 10:05 PM
    Saturday, September 29, 2012 5:05 PM
  • microsoft love us... 

    they sad that they were stupid for many years, and only commandline server is good, and all what was good in "windows" now is a story... 

    UNIX win...

    Monday, October 1, 2012 9:39 AM
  • I am sorry that you don't like Metro UI however this feature is too popular in mobile users, as for the other companies they are digging deep to make this more popular like Apple, Nokia, Samsung and almost all companies are on the same track, well personally I appreciate this feature I don't find it annoying rather I welcome this feature.

    Windows 8 is released to market and you must have seen its all new awesome technology and feature. Windows 8 is a dawn to new age to computing however if you don't like and not comfortable with that then you can try to disable some of the annoying feature out of it and use it that can give you the best of the both worlds. 

    The golden mean that i see is to add start menu to windows 8 that controls your metro UI without removing it, you are gonna love that.

    http://www.technology-howto.com/2012/10/Add-Start-Menu-To-Windows-8.html

    http://www.technology-howto.com/2012/10/Remove-Metro-UI-From-Windows-8.html

    Please share if you find something new on it 

    Thursday, October 25, 2012 5:45 PM
  • Are you for REAL!?!

    We need to RDP to server desktops ALL THE TIME. It has been explained in this thread that the UI is BITCHED on multiple monitos. I suggest you try to use multiple monitors with multiple server RDP sessions spread across each monitor then try to select the 60 pixels that's the hotspot to get to metro or the charm bar.

    I'm just so fed up with Microsoft if there was an alternate solution I'd drop you guys in a heartbeat.

    Do you MS workers have any comprehension of how many people you have pissed off this fall!

    You just wait till 2013 when the cries turn to a chorus of SCREAMS!

    Tuesday, November 20, 2012 9:32 PM
  • "If you want to treat like a 'real server', install it without the GUI and put RSAT on Windows 8."

    So we have to have a Windows 8 client/workstation to do this!!!

    RSAT needs a bloody Win8 client to run!!!

    ARE YOU FOR REAL!!!

    This is the biggest f-up in the history of the company if you ask me!

    I won't touch Server 2012 with a ten foot pole!

    Also I have to comment on how PATHETIC this forum is. It will not work with Firefox and eachy comment doesn't have a audit trail IE message #.

    Also the way this windows scrolls when you get to the end is brutally bad.

    I'VE HAD IT MS

    You can't even make a decent support forum at this point in the game.

    YOU GUYS ARE LOOSING IT!!!

    • Edited by Solid-State Tuesday, November 20, 2012 10:18 PM
    Tuesday, November 20, 2012 10:17 PM
  • Ben,

    Have you or anyone else at Microsoft actually tried using this new interface on a server the way things are done in a real-world datacenter?  I connect to all of my servers using RDP with several open at one time, so they are not full-screen or I use VM tools which do not allow for full-screen.  Go ahead and try this out.  Try hovering and clicking in the corner when it is not the physical corner of a monitor.  This is a major design flaw for the server UI.  I've had to tell my CIO that we can't move our servers to Windows 2012 when we install SQL 2012 and TFS 2012, and eventually SharePoint 2013 because of this one simple UI design flaw.  While I've found the UI to be acceptable on a laptop or desktop, it's simply unusable on a server.

    And the executives are already not happy with Microsoft because some sales guy tried to push Lync at a SharePoint demo even after the sales guy was told don't mention it because they just dropped major money on new Cisco IP phones.  These kinds of things never happened when Bill Gates was still around.  Even Ballmer used to get it - http://www.ntk.net/media/developers.mpg - even if he did have a little to much coffee.  Did someone finally lock Raymond Chen in a closet and throw away the key?

    Seriously, someone needs to get this fixed quickly, and Sinofsky needs to get SP1 out the door quickly with the old Aero UI included.  The one thing that i could always count on from Microsoft was backwards compatibility.  Things got a little shaky with the change to .NET, but not like this.  My servers are not tablets and they never will be.  Same thing for developer laptops.  Apple and Google understand this, why not Microsoft?  Thanks in advance for fixing this design flaw quickly.


    100% ON THE MONEY!

    How the hell did this even pass Q/A testing!

    And how the hell did Steven Sinofsky RAM his Metro LUNACY into the server dev team's product!

    HOW THE HELL DID THIS HAPPEN MICROSOFT!!!

    As an MS user and partner for dam near 20 years...

    I'VE HAD IT WITH YOU MICROSOFT

    Tuesday, November 20, 2012 10:20 PM