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Server Operating System Upgrade Question RRS feed

  • Question

  • We are working with a client that has a line-of-business application that is built on Microsoft SQL Server.  Specifically, they are using SQL Server 2014 Standard.  The operating system on this server is the now-discontinued Windows Server 2008.  We are planning to upgrade their server to Windows Server 2016 Standard.  Will this OS upgrade incur any costs related to SQL Server 2014, assuming that the user count does not change (no additional CALs)?  Or can we just purchase and install Windows Server 2016 and leave the SQL Server 2014 side of things as-is?  Windows Server 2016 is listed as a supported operating system for SQL Server 2014 in the Microsoft System Requirements document for SQL Server 2014.

    Thanks very much for your assistance with this.

    John


    John

    Monday, April 13, 2020 3:07 PM

All replies

  • Hi JN92,

    Your query is licensing related and its always recommended to get it clarified from Microsoft or from your License partners/Vendors.

    Thanks.


    Regards, AKash Pawar

    Monday, April 13, 2020 3:11 PM
  • Thanks Akash.  Actually I did try the Microsoft licensing telephone number first, and after entering in various responses to narrow the focus of the call, I received a message that the licensing line was experiencing technical problems and was not operational at this time.

    John


    John

    Monday, April 13, 2020 3:15 PM
  • Thanks Akash.  Actually I did try the Microsoft licensing telephone number first, and after entering in various responses to narrow the focus of the call, I received a message that the licensing line was experiencing technical problems and was not operational at this time.

    Then you may want to wait until those technical problems have resolved.

    My very unauthorative answer to your question is that there is no cost incurred on the SQL Server license cost; I've never heard anything about your operating system affects the license cost for SQL Server. (But I assume they need to pay for the OS upgrade as such.)

    Then again, in many of when you upgrade the OS, you also move to new hardware, and this can mean that you now have more cores than before, and that can definitely affect the license cost for SQL Server.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se

    Monday, April 13, 2020 5:28 PM