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Cannot Copy Local Profiles in Server 2008 R2 RC

    Question

  • Hey,
    UconCornelias posted the same behavior for Windows 7.
    "Copying local profiles.  Not sure if this is a change in functionality or a bug.  If you want to copy the profile of a local user, you can login to the Server as the local Administrator, go to System Properties > User Profiles, choose a user's profile, then click the Copy To button to copy that profile to another profile.  In Server 2008 R2 RC, the Copy To button is grayed out when you choose another user's profile.  All you can choose from is Change Type or Delete.  What happened here?"

    Tuesday, May 12, 2009 5:38 AM

Answers

  • Hello djsp,
    That scenario that was used to replace the Default User Profile was unsupported in Windows Vista, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008 and unsupported in Windows XP.  There were many issues with it in the prior OSes, even though those issues were not always apparent, they did exist and caused inconsistencies and lingering problems.
    This article points to the supported way of updating the Default User profile which is the only profile that should be used to for creation of the new user profile.
    959753 How to customize the default local user profile when you prepare an image of Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows XP, or Windows Server 2003
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;959753

    Thanks, Darrell Gorter[MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights
    • Marked as answer by Elisa Willman Sunday, May 31, 2009 11:06 PM
    Friday, May 29, 2009 4:43 PM

All replies

  • hi there,

    sorry for the delayed rsponse, i was attending Tech-ed 2009 , i will be testing this tomorrow and update you.
    sainath Attending Microsoft Teched 2009
    Monday, May 18, 2009 10:45 AM
    Moderator
  • When you try to copy a profile to another user Windows will not allow the Copy to ... action while someone else is logged in with the specific username, because the profile is in use. I am afraid if you are trying to copy administrators profile to some other user ?? If I am not correct please do let me know.

    Thanks


    http://technetfaqs.wordpress.com
    Monday, May 18, 2009 11:05 AM
  • Hi there,
    no, i try to copy the local Adminisrator's profile to "Default user's" profile.
    Im logged with a Domain-Administrator Account. With all Profiles except "Default profile" the "copy to"-Button is greyed out.
    Up to Version 2008 r2 it works fine. The same behavior is to be observed in Windows 7.
    Im sorry for my terrible english!
    Thanks
    Monday, May 18, 2009 1:23 PM
  • Hello,

         The grayed out Copy To button usually occurs when you try to copy a profile that has been used since the computer has been started. Reboot the computer and don't log on as the profile you're trying to copy.Instead logon with some other user and try, The Copy To button should now be available.


    http://technetfaqs.wordpress.com
    Monday, May 18, 2009 1:50 PM
  • Hello,
    the Computer is fresh rebooted.
    All Profiles except "Default profile" are greyed out. It looks like a bug in Server 2008 R2 RC and Windows 7.
    Vista, Server 2003, Server 2008 works well.
    Thanks
    Monday, May 18, 2009 2:15 PM
  • Well I dont know exactly I tryand see . Well if your are seriously looking to copy the profile we can try an another way around.




    Thanks


    http://technetfaqs.wordpress.com
    Monday, May 18, 2009 2:26 PM
  • Any word on this? Just trying to keep this up there as an issue.
    Thursday, May 21, 2009 2:53 PM
  • Still nothing on this? This is a very important issue to many of us in enterprise settings.
    Thursday, May 28, 2009 6:08 PM
  • Hello djsp,
    That scenario that was used to replace the Default User Profile was unsupported in Windows Vista, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008 and unsupported in Windows XP.  There were many issues with it in the prior OSes, even though those issues were not always apparent, they did exist and caused inconsistencies and lingering problems.
    This article points to the supported way of updating the Default User profile which is the only profile that should be used to for creation of the new user profile.
    959753 How to customize the default local user profile when you prepare an image of Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows XP, or Windows Server 2003
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;959753

    Thanks, Darrell Gorter[MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights
    • Marked as answer by Elisa Willman Sunday, May 31, 2009 11:06 PM
    Friday, May 29, 2009 4:43 PM
  • Then this probably shouldn't be in the KB, right?

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/319974

    Monday, June 01, 2009 3:26 PM
  • Then this probably shouldn't be in the KB, right?

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/319974


    Should be, but is not, since the link you posted leads to a page that only has a circular reference (points to its self).

    Note, that page has now been corrected.
    • Edited by Brian Borg Tuesday, June 02, 2009 11:58 PM
    Monday, June 01, 2009 9:22 PM
  • Wow. So they ended up taking it out today. I guess that is one way to deal with the situation, treat it like it never actually worked in the first place. Ha.
    • Proposed as answer by Freelancetech Tuesday, June 02, 2009 7:21 PM
    Monday, June 01, 2009 10:18 PM
  • So it sounds like you have to repackage the server installation to setup the default profile. This really stinks. I have my server setup and ready to go. I need to setup the default profile and now I find that I have to use sysprep to do this. I'm wondering if there is a simple process to do this using sysprep.
    Tuesday, June 02, 2009 7:26 PM
  • Sorry djsp, I didn't mean to propose your statement as an answer. Just clicked the wrong button.
    Tuesday, June 02, 2009 7:28 PM
  • Looks that way.  At least they removed the circular reference.

    Now who says they never listen?
    Tuesday, June 02, 2009 11:57 PM
  • Any advice on how to do this on a server that is setup and ready to go?

    Wednesday, June 03, 2009 5:41 PM
  • Hello,
    I would like to ask some questions about replacing the Default User Profile to better understand the scenarios and reasons why it is being replaced.
    Certainly details would be appreciated on the scenarios.
    If you prefer to send directly to me that is fine as well
    Darrellg@online.microsoft.com
    remove the online from the address to send to me
    ·         Why is there a need to update the default profile so often?
    ·         What types of customizations are you doing?
    ·         What types of profiles are being customizing?  Mandatory, network default, local default?
    ·         Why is sysprep inadequate for this?


    Thanks, Darrell Gorter This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights
    Tuesday, June 09, 2009 1:39 AM
  • Well I can speak for my side.
    1. There is not a need to do this often. I need it to create the base image that I give out to my employees to build servers, workstations, etc.
    2. Customization in any form. Icons on desktop, task bar settings, all personal settings that we want in place for every user that logs on.
    3. Local default. That is it.
    4. I know Microsoft pushes sysprep, but there are many of us who don't use it. My company uses Acronis. Have for many years. It is nice to have an image joined to the workgroup with all the settings you want that you can copy off a hard drive and bring up in 15 minutes with no further configuration needed unless you need to join the domain. On the desktop side, we are an engineering firm, and we have specific ways that we set up our default profile so that all of our applications can work together. It is no small task. So we are not looking for any further configuration to happen once the computer hits the desk.
    Wednesday, June 10, 2009 11:49 PM
  • Hello,
    1. We need to update the "default profile" once per Server.
    2. We install with the "local admin" user-account. After finishing the Server, we do some personal settings like IE-Settings, Desktop,  ntbackup cmd, and so on.
    3. The we need to copy the admin-Profile to the default, so that all the other users (domain-admins) have the same equal environment.
    4.
    Sysprep is no option, because the Server is still "ready"!

    This scenario is working on Windows Server 2000, 2003, 2008, Vista. All Versions with or without ServicePacks.

    Only Server 2008 R2 RC and Windows 7 RC will not work.

    I'm sorry for my bad english.
    Wednesday, July 01, 2009 10:20 AM
  • How do your questions have any relevance?  Your CUSTOMER wants the copy to functionality back, that should be enough. 

    We use it to setup a standard desktop experience and I am irritated it is gone.  Sysprep is NOT a valid answer to the situation.  Why, you ask.  It is extra work we don't need to do.

    edit Unattend.xml
    Why do I need to do all this instead of just clicking copy to?

    capture the image
    deploy the image
    I don't need to create an image and redeploy it for every server or workstation.  Also don't need to reload a pc just to make changes to the default profile.

    Putting the copy to back would be would be the correct answer.  It works.  You have to load the ntuser.dat into regedit and get rid of the references to c:\users\username, but it works. 

    We are your customers.  We're asking you to put it back in.
    Wednesday, August 26, 2009 1:28 PM
  • I met the same problem. In server 2008 age, we can simply copy the template user profile to deault account thus we don't need to set up account one by one. But in 2008 R2 age, we just can not do that.  We are using 2008 enterprise  RTM. Only default user profile can be coied to other account. What is it for? reset profile for other accounts? simply deleting user profile and logging abck on can reset profile. i think MS has a stupid design here. 
    Monday, September 21, 2009 10:48 PM
  • This is dumb, why would they make this change. I have spent the last week pounding my head trying to figure out why this was not working, went out and bout the Terminals Services Resource Kit for 2008 and it says to use the copy to:
    "Be sure to use the CopyProfile tool--do not do this manually,"
    well that would be great if it wan not broken!
    Friday, September 25, 2009 7:15 PM
  • I'm with you guys but I did find something that's helpful....

    This does not install and can be run off a USB thumb drive and 'enables' locked menus and buttons. Basically you:

    1) Download Windows Enabler
    http://www.angelfire.com/falcon/speedload/Enabler.htm

    2) Save it to a thumb drive

    3) Right-Click and choose "Run As Administrator" on the Windows Enabler EXE on the system you wish to copy the profile

    4) Click the Notification Tray icon to turn Windows Enabler on

    5) Open the USER PROFILES dialog and click on the greyed out COPY TO... button to see it become enabled.

    6) Copy the profile as you used to in XP and Vista.

    Hope this helps,


    via: http://joeelway.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!2095EAC3772C41DB!2708.entry

    • Proposed as answer by Brian Borg Friday, October 02, 2009 9:14 PM
    Friday, October 02, 2009 1:45 PM
  • It is really not a good idea to use "Windows Enabler" to get the grey out button back, however, it seems the only way right now.  Microsoft should enable the button officially, there is no point in forcing people to use sysprep!
    Thursday, December 24, 2009 7:38 AM
  • As stated earlier in this thread, the scenario that was previously used to replace the Default User Profile (overwriting via the User Profile Control Panel applet) was unsupported in Windows Vista and unsupported in Windows XP.  There were many issues with it in the prior OS’s, even though those issues were not always apparent, they did exist and caused inconsistencies and lingering problems.

    For Domain joined systems, an alternative exists that in many cases will provide a centralized way to update user profiles and accomplish the same tasks that many of you are seeking: Group Policy Preferences. In contrast to policy settings, preferences allow users to change them after you’ve deployed them, they are unmanaged. Additionally, deploying some preferences for users could be a necessity in locked-down environments. Organizations have deployed preferences in a variety of ways, most commonly default user profiles, reg files, and logon scripts. Including preferences in Windows images is also common. In any case, most methods for deploying preferences are decentralized and ‘high touch’.

     

    In contrast to the less IT-friendly methods for deploying preferences, Group Policy preferences add to Group Policy a centralized system for deploying preferences. It provides the means to simplify deployment, reduce configuration errors, and reduce IT costs. Rather than using the steps described earlier to deploy mapped drives, for example, you simply create a Group Policy object and edit its Drive Maps preference item.

     

    Group Policy preferences do not require you to install any services on servers. Windows Server 2008 includes Group Policy preferences by default as part of the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC). Administrators will also be able to configure and deploy Group Policy preferences in a Windows Server 2003 environment by installing the Remote Server Administration Tools (RSAT) on a computer running Windows Vista with SP1.

     

    You can download the whitepaper that describes Group Policy Preferences here: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=42e30e3f-6f01-4610-9d6e-f6e0fb7a0790&displaylang=en. This white paper describes Group Policy preferences—its features, the differences between policy settings and preferences, and the many benefits of using this new technology.

     

    If there are specific customizations that you made using the old method to replace the Default User Profile that you cannot make with Group Policy Preferences, you can email them to me: PLeBlanc@*microsoft.com (remove the *)

     

    Note that Group Policy preferences will not address creation of Mandatory Profiles and some other settings may still require the supported method of customizing the Default User profile. This article points to the supported way of updating the Default User profile:
    959753 How to customize the default local user profile when you prepare an image of Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows XP, or Windows Server 2003
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;959753


    Paul LeBlanc MSFT
    Thursday, May 20, 2010 11:08 AM
  •  

      Why is there a need to update the default profile so often?

     

    I have a w2k8 ts and a lot of printers. If I want to change a setting in one of them for exemple print on both sides I have to copy the profile to the Defaut profile otherwise only function for mee . I have spent almost one week on this problem. Can You in detail tell me how to create the unatten.xml file and it's contents. 

    Thursday, June 03, 2010 8:49 PM