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Virtualization disabled sleep mode. Any workarounds? RRS feed

  • Question

  •  

    Hi,

    I am able to run Virtualization in my laptop (T61P) but the problem is that when I enable the role, sleep mode becomes disabled.

    When running powercfg -a I receive the following statement.

    Standby (S3)
            An internal system component has disabled this standby state.

     

    Sleep mode works without virtualization role.

     

    Do you know is there a workaround for this?

     

    ilija

    Saturday, October 27, 2007 11:05 AM

Answers

  • Windows Server virtualization will be supported on systems that are certified for Windows Server 2008. Laptops do not fall in that category.

    Monday, October 29, 2007 3:48 PM

All replies

  •  ilijal wrote:

     

    Hi,

    I am able to run Virtualization in my laptop (T61P) but the problem is that when I enable the role, sleep mode becomes disabled.

    When running powercfg -a I receive the following statement.

    Standby (S3)
            An internal system component has disabled this standby state.

     

    Sleep mode works without virtualization role.

     

    Do you know is there a workaround for this?

     

    ilija

     

    I guess this behavior makes perfect sense as you would not want Windows Server 2008 / WSV to automatically go to sleep when mission critical applications are running as VMs on the host machine, either active with visible foreground windows or completely hidden in the background.

     

    Do let us know if this helps. Thanks.

     

    rgds,

     

    Saturday, October 27, 2007 4:09 PM
    Moderator
  •  

    I see your point and I agree but at the same time the feature would be forced using GPO or server settings by admins anyway so I don't see reason why one could not use laptop to virtualize applications like using Virtual Server 2005 R2 SP1 which is also meant for this and still does not affect the power management features of the operating system.

     

    ilija

    Saturday, October 27, 2007 7:13 PM
  • Windows Server virtualization will be supported on systems that are certified for Windows Server 2008. Laptops do not fall in that category.

    Monday, October 29, 2007 3:48 PM
  • To provide some more context here:

     

    With a hosted VMM model (like Virtual Server or Virtual PC) the VMM driver gets to participate in power management decisions just like other system drivers do.  When a request to sleep gets made it is able to react accordingly.  With a hypervisor model power management is controlled by a 'root' operating system that is relatively unaware of the state of the hypervisor and of any virtual machines.  In order to ensure that the root operating system does nothing detrimental the hypervisor needs to change some aspects of the power management features that are reported up from the hardware.

     

    Disabling sleep is one of the things we do while doing this.

     

    While this is awkward for laptop users, this is a server virtualization solution and supporting sleep would add a lot of complexity for a situation that 99% of our customers are not going to be interested in.

     

    Cheers,

    Ben

    Tuesday, October 30, 2007 7:21 AM
  • Ben,

    I believe that there has been a critical error of judgment on the usage of Hyper-V.  Please consider that every Microsoft Server application now requires to be run on a 64-bit environment, and even with Windows 7, VPC only allows for 32-bit guests.  That leaves all of us developers and demo staff to run our laptops on Windows 2008 Server with Hyper-V so that we can run a 64-bit guest OS.  There are a LOT of your users in this situation and using laptops.  I would disagree that 99% of your customers are not going to be interested in this feature.  Ideally, Microsoft should make VPC run a 64-bit client, but if Hyper-V continues to disable sleep and hibernate, your users are going to flock to VMWare instead.  Please reconsider!

    Thanks,
    Shan
    Thursday, November 26, 2009 11:06 PM
  • Since this is an old thread, I just wanted to reassure people that this feedback has been noted and is not forgotten or ignored. This request is made by many people and is a frequent subject of NDA discussions.
    Friday, November 27, 2009 1:37 AM
    Moderator
  • Since this is an old thread, I just wanted to reassure people that this feedback has been noted and is not forgotten or ignored. This request is made by many people and is a frequent subject of NDA discussions.

    Thanks, John.  I have this exact need, and it's what led me to this thread.  It is very disappointing, because I am a SharePoint architect, and SharePoint 2010 is a major resource hog and requires 64-bit.  So, what I have is this gaudy 16GB/QuadCore laptop with W2K8R2 as my host OS so that I can run a 5-server SharePoint 2010 farm in Hyper-V.  I would prefer to have Win7 64-bit as my host OS, since this will be my daily-use workstation, but I don't have that option unless I run VMware.  That's ok, because I'm ok with W2K8R2, but now I have to keep my laptop running 24/7 unless I want to shut it down.  This is very inefficient, especially when traveling and speaking, and it's even worse when I have such a beefy laptop that sucks power down so fast when not plugged in.  Since I can't be plugged in while traveling and moving about, then I have to shut down, which is terribly inefficient.

    Please allow us to use Sleep mode at our discretion when using Hyper-V on laptops instead of pushing us even more towards other virtualization competitors.
    SharePoint Architect || My Blog
    Monday, February 22, 2010 12:16 AM
  • I want to clear up any confusion about sleep mode for Windows Server 2008 (all versions) and Hyper-V (all versions) and provide an update: It's not going to happen.

    Monday, February 22, 2010 1:08 AM
    Moderator
  • If this is "not going to happen", then I would respectfully ask that you put as much pressure on the Virtual PC team to support 64-bit, as soon as possible.  There is a huge gap in the current state of virtualization at Microsoft and this gap is going to frustrate your customers to jump ship and use virtualization from your competitors.  All new Microsoft server platforms require 64-bit, the only virtualization solution you have that supports a 64-bit guest is Hyper-V, and Hyper-V doesn't support laptop configurations.  All three restrictions are placed on us by Microsoft designs and if any one of them were addressed, that would allow us to continue.  With all three problems, we are blocked.
    Monday, February 22, 2010 1:14 AM
  • I want to clear up any confusion about sleep mode for Windows Server 2008 (all versions) and Hyper-V (all versions) and provide an update: It's not going to happen.


    John, is this response based on conversations and decisions that have occurred since November 27th?  When you last replied, you mentioned how big of a topic it was and how it was becoming more obvious to MS that this was a major area of need, but now your response is cold and harsh as if the management response to all of us was "screw you."  Is that the case?  My company is 100% MS focused, which is rare, so being forced to use VMWare due to having 0 options with Hyper-V is difficult to swallow...
    SharePoint Architect || My Blog
    Monday, February 22, 2010 1:34 AM
  • I don't work for Microsoft. I don't speak for Microsoft management. I did meet with them last week. I didn't mean to come across as harsh, only as definitive.

    The Hyper-V product team is aware of the interest many people have in enabling hibernation in Windows Server 2008 so that Hyper-V can take advantage of it. They also understand that many of the people who are asking for this want it because Virtual PC does not support 64-bit guests. The Virtual PC product team is well aware that 64-bit support is a top customer request, if not the top one.

    Enabling hibernation for a server operating system is technically very difficult. Although Windows Server 2008 (including R2) is used as an operating system on laptops, the primary market for it is on servers. Hyper-V was not designed for or intended for use on laptops. Server customers are not asking for hibernation (see Ben's 99% comment above - he's not exaggerating). Hibernation is an edge case for this operating system. Among the fractional percentage of customers asking for hibernation, most of them are asking for it because Virtual PC doesn't support 64-bit guests. The root problem for most people is actually the lack of 64-bit support in Virtual PC. Resources for making changes are limited. Server customers are asking for other features that are being worked on. What those features are will be announced by Microsoft at a later date.

    Your concerns are definitely understood and noted by Microsoft. As of today, Microsoft is not divulging its plans for the next release of Virtual PC, not even to those with nondisclosure agreements.

    For those of you using VMware instead of Virtual PC, VirtualBox is another option to consider.
    Monday, February 22, 2010 4:00 AM
    Moderator
  • To be clear, by "harsh" I just meant it in terms of "the harsh facts" of the situation, not you personally being harsh.

    Thanks for the info.  I also wanted to thank you for helping me through some Hyper-V networking stuff that I found on your blog.  You got me over my wireless connectivity issue by utilizing RRAS + NAT, which left me able to use bridging for putting my Host on the virtual SharePoint domain. 
    SharePoint Architect || My Blog
    Monday, February 22, 2010 4:19 AM
  • I don't work for Microsoft. I don't speak for Microsoft management. I did meet with them last week. I didn't mean to come across as harsh, only as definitive.

    The Hyper-V product team is aware of the interest many people have in enabling hibernation in Windows Server 2008 so that Hyper-V can take advantage of it. They also understand that many of the people who are asking for this want it because Virtual PC does not support 64-bit guests. The Virtual PC product team is well aware that 64-bit support is a top customer request, if not the top one.

    Enabling hibernation for a server operating system is technically very difficult. Although Windows Server 2008 (including R2) is used as an operating system on laptops, the primary market for it is on servers. Hyper-V was not designed for or intended for use on laptops. Server customers are not asking for hibernation (see Ben's 99% comment above - he's not exaggerating). Hibernation is an edge case for this operating system. Among the fractional percentage of customers asking for hibernation, most of them are asking for it because Virtual PC doesn't support 64-bit guests. The root problem for most people is actually the lack of 64-bit support in Virtual PC. Resources for making changes are limited. Server customers are asking for other features that are being worked on. What those features are will be announced by Microsoft at a later date.

    Your concerns are definitely understood and noted by Microsoft. As of today, Microsoft is not divulging its plans for the next release of Virtual PC, not even to those with nondisclosure agreements.

    For those of you using VMware instead of Virtual PC, VirtualBox is another option to consider.
    Clarification, I don't think that most of us are asking for Hyper-V + Sleep/Hibernate on Windows 2008.  What we really want is to run some variant of Hyper-V on Windows 7. 

    I've got to say that I've been pretty frustrated by the disconnect between Virtual PC and Hyper-V.  I just wish that they'd unify the virtual hardware and give us the ability to execute Hyper-V VMs in something like Virtual PC.  When I'm running a VM on my laptop, I don't expect to have enterprise quality reliability so I'm willing to make some major compromises.  The goal for me is to be able to do sleep AND run Hyper-V and to only have to support one VM format between my laptop and my servers.  Since Virtual PC 2009 doesn't support multiprocessor VMs, I simply can't use it for most of what I do on my laptop. 

    Even though I'm a huge MSFT fanboy, the lack of decent virtualization support on Win7 has unfortunately forced me to start using a competing product. 



    Benjamin Day - Microsoft MVP for Visual Studio Team System -- http://blog.benday.com
    Monday, March 8, 2010 3:06 PM
  • I want to second what Benjamin Day said.  We need a hypervisor for Windows 7 that can natively run Hyper-V images.

    I work for a Gold Certified Microsoft Partner and we receive Pre-Sales Virtual Machine Demos directly from MSFT.  Up till now they've been in the Virtual PC/Virtual Server format.  So our Developers and Pre-Sales Engineers (who do demos in front of clients) have been able to move these images between centralized Virtual Server Hosts (so multiple people can access and prepare for Demos) and their every day use laptops so they can bring them to Prospect sites (we often can't remote back into our network due to our prospect's security protocols).

    Now that MSFT has told us that future Pre-Sales VMs will be in the Hyper-V format it'll be impossible for us to use that model unless I put Windows Server 2008 R2 on my employee's laptops.  I really don't want to do that.  Windows 7 is much lighter and more appropriate for laptops and over the years we've run into issues installing client type software on Server OSs.

    It's cost prohibitive and very inconvenient to supply our Pre-Sales engineers (and some developers) with two systems (an every day system running Windows 7, and a Demo laptop running Server 2008 R2 with Hyper-V).  We really need a virtualization solution for Windows 7 that can natively open and run Hyper-V VMs.

    If MSFT wasn't providing us with Pre-Sales VMs (thank you very much MSFT for doing that, it's been a great help during the sales process), we'd probably turn to another solution like VMWare that allows us to run the same VMs on servers and laptops using the appropriate host operating system.

    So please tell me when the two MSFT Virtualization technologies will again be merged back into one unified system (Client app and Server Role that can run the same VMs without significant reconfiguration).


    Alex
    Wednesday, May 12, 2010 7:54 PM
  • I want to second what Benjamin Day said.  We need a hypervisor for Windows 7 that can natively run Hyper-V images.

    I work for a Gold Certified Microsoft Partner and we receive Pre-Sales Virtual Machine Demos directly from MSFT.  Up till now they've been in the Virtual PC/Virtual Server format.  So our Developers and Pre-Sales Engineers (who do demos in front of clients) have been able to move these images between centralized Virtual Server Hosts (so multiple people can access and prepare for Demos) and their every day use laptops so they can bring them to Prospect sites (we often can't remote back into our network due to our prospect's security protocols).

    Now that MSFT has told us that future Pre-Sales VMs will be in the Hyper-V format it'll be impossible for us to use that model unless I put Windows Server 2008 R2 on my employee's laptops.  I really don't want to do that.  Windows 7 is much lighter and more appropriate for laptops and over the years we've run into issues installing client type software on Server OSs.

    It's cost prohibitive and very inconvenient to supply our Pre-Sales engineers (and some developers) with two systems (an every day system running Windows 7, and a Demo laptop running Server 2008 R2 with Hyper-V).  We really need a virtualization solution for Windows 7 that can natively open and run Hyper-V VMs.

    If MSFT wasn't providing us with Pre-Sales VMs (thank you very much MSFT for doing that, it's been a great help during the sales process), we'd probably turn to another solution like VMWare that allows us to run the same VMs on servers and laptops using the appropriate host operating system.

    So please tell me when the two MSFT Virtualization technologies will again be merged back into one unified system (Client app and Server Role that can run the same VMs without significant reconfiguration).


    Alex

    To follow on with what Alex (aka Jinseng) just said, I can just *feel* that someone from MSFT is about to say "well, you can dual boot Win7 and Win2008 and then you can just bounce in to Win2008 when you need to run a Hyper-V VM".  Yah...that's not going to cut it.  I need to run Hyper-V VMs all the time on my laptop and having to shut down my OS and go in to another one is going to be a pain.  Plus, there's the fact that there are probably lots of files that I need in both boot configurations.  I don't want to have to install every app I need in both OSes just so that I can read the files. 


    Bottom line: Virtual PC-style experience that runs Hyper-V VMs on Windows 7 x64. 

    -Ben


    Benjamin Day - Microsoft MVP for Visual Studio Team System -- http://blog.benday.com
    Wednesday, May 12, 2010 8:06 PM
  • Mike, your response is not helpful no matter how many times that you repeat it.
    Kevin King
    Monday, August 16, 2010 6:07 PM
  • I have a similar issue as does Benjamin. 

    As an MCT, I have a high-end laptop so that I can run all of the classes that I teach. Most of them require Hyper-V. It would be nice to sleep the laptop.


    Kevin King
    Monday, August 16, 2010 6:15 PM
  • Our only two options are to use another virtualization provider (such as VMWare or Sun Virtual Box), or to wait until Virtual PC supports 64-bit guest operating systems.  I have heard that this is in the works, but no timetable or betas yet.

    Shan

    Monday, August 16, 2010 6:17 PM
  • Kevin,

    Have you checked out VirtualBox?  It's free and it will execute Hyper-V images.  It's pretty sweet cuz you can round trip Hyper-V images from Hyper-V to VirtualBox and back to Hyper-V.  I haven't done extensive testing with it but it works well enough.

    BTW, I'm still super annoyed that I can't run Hyper-V VMs on my Win7 laptop.  Actually, I'm more annoyed.  Oracle's virtualization software can execute Hyper-V images but MSFT can't drop a Power Tool for this?  Really?! I have to use an *Oracle* product to run a Hyper-V image?  I'm a huge MSFT fanboy and even I think this is ridiculous. 

    Anyway, I eventually sucked it up and bought a separate laptop (HP Envy 15 w/ 16gb RAM) for presentations and classes that runs Windows Server 2008 R2 + System Center VMM + Hyper-V.  It's great except for having to haul 2 laptops around.  2 laptops through airport security != fun.

    -Ben


    Benjamin Day - Microsoft MVP for Visual Studio ALM - http://blog.benday.com
    Monday, August 16, 2010 6:24 PM
  • Ben,

    What I do is use Boot2Vhd, and boot my Windows 2008 R2 Server (hyperv host) in a 10GB VHD file.  I then host my guest OSes on my primiary hard drive.  This way I can boot to Windows 7 or HyperV.  It gets me down to a single laptop for travelling, but I agree with your disappointment of the current status of Windows 7 virtualization.

    Shan

    Monday, August 16, 2010 6:28 PM
  • Our only two options are to use another virtualization provider (such as VMWare or Sun Virtual Box), or to wait until Virtual PC supports 64-bit guest operating systems.  I have heard that this is in the works, but no timetable or betas yet.

    Shan


    Shan, you actually can run 64-bit virtuals in Virtual PC 2009... *but* they're only single core. 
    Benjamin Day - Microsoft MVP for Visual Studio ALM - http://blog.benday.com
    Monday, August 16, 2010 6:28 PM
  • No current version of Virtual PC supports x64, unless you've got some secret version. 

    Not sure, what VPC 2009 is, but Windows Virtual PC for Windows 7 is 32bit VMs only.

    VMWare, VirtualBox and Parallels Workstation can run x64 VMs.

    Monday, August 16, 2010 8:19 PM
  • I hate to bump an old thread but I did have a relevant inquiry that has gone unaddressed.  Although it was an installation of Server 2008 R2 on a quad core laptop that caused me to become aware of the Hyper-V \ Sleep incompatibility; I believe there is a genuine server hardware scenario and business need that Microsoft may have overlooked. 

    In my attempt to find a workaround to the issue, I began looking at what APC and UPS manufacturers were doing to handle graceful server shutdowns after power losses where the Server was running the Hyper-V role.  In my cursory research I found the APC standard UPS software package does not support servers with Hyper-V.  That trend appeared to be true of other UPS companies as well.

    At my company headquarters we have a dedicated battery closet to sustain the datacenters for the duration of time between a power loss and when the diesel backup generator kicks in.  However at our smaller sites and branch offices that isn’t the case.  Over the last year we have consolidated all the outdated prior generation servers at remote sites onto current gen HP DL380 Servers by leveraging p2v and Hyper-V.  Although we have robust UPS units, not all those sites are outfitted with backup generates.  What is the solution to handle legitimate server hardware shutdowns after a power loss in those situations?

    Obviously Hyper-V virtualization is leveraged most frequently by large enterprises; but is it not also targeted towards SMBs?  Before I came onboard with my current organization, I did consulting work all over the Southeast with small and medium businesses.  I can say with confidence that over 80% percent of them did not have backup power generators.   Of the ones that did have generators, most were precautionary units they only intended to use temporarily after an event such as a Hurricane.  (I only had 1 SMB client with a permanent placement, hard wired, generator with automatic transfer switches.)

    Does Microsoft or any Vendor have a solution for that type scenario?  Only option I would be aware of would be cobbling something together with technology like the E1 Nightwatchmen product.     

    Although it is the Laptop users with Hyper-V that are clamoring for a solution, there are other business cases that would require it.  An enterprise with a full team of guys can likely contend with that issue but now that I am aware of this shortcoming, I would be very hesitant to leverage a Hyper-V solution for any of my SMB consulting projects.

    Tuesday, December 7, 2010 6:49 PM
  • To provide some more context here:

     

    With a hosted VMM model (like Virtual Server or Virtual PC) the VMM driver gets to participate in power management decisions just like other system drivers do.  When a request to sleep gets made it is able to react accordingly.  With a hypervisor model power management is controlled by a 'root' operating system that is relatively unaware of the state of the hypervisor and of any virtual machines.  In order to ensure that the root operating system does nothing detrimental the hypervisor needs to change some aspects of the power management features that are reported up from the hardware.

     

    Disabling sleep is one of the things we do while doing this.

     

    While this is awkward for laptop users, this is a server virtualization solution and supporting sleep would add a lot of complexity for a situation that 99% of our customers are not going to be interested in.

     

    Cheers,

    Ben


    That doesn't make sense to me.  That same logic should apply to shutdowns.  If the root operating system cannot safely put the server in standby because it is unaware of the state of the hypervisor and the virtual machines then how can it shut it down ?  Did MS forget to disable shutdown as well or did someone just wake up before going that far ?

    Wednesday, January 5, 2011 2:08 PM
  • To provide some more context here:

     

    With a hosted VMM model (like Virtual Server or Virtual PC) the VMM driver gets to participate in power management decisions just like other system drivers do.  When a request to sleep gets made it is able to react accordingly.  With a hypervisor model power management is controlled by a 'root' operating system that is relatively unaware of the state of the hypervisor and of any virtual machines.  In order to ensure that the root operating system does nothing detrimental the hypervisor needs to change some aspects of the power management features that are reported up from the hardware.

     

    Disabling sleep is one of the things we do while doing this.

     

    While this is awkward for laptop users, this is a server virtualization solution and supporting sleep would add a lot of complexity for a situation that 99% of our customers are not going to be interested in.

     

    Cheers,

    Ben


    That doesn't make sense to me.  That same logic should apply to shutdowns.  If the root operating system cannot safely put the server in standby because it is unaware of the state of the hypervisor and the virtual machines then how can it shut it down ?  Did MS forget to disable shutdown as well or did someone just wake up before going that far ?

    I don't think that they were ever awake. Think about it, Machine has Hyper-V Role but no VM's are running. What is the problem with putting the laptop to sleep ? And yes what happens when someone shuts down the laptop. This is probably the dumbest single feature of Hyper-V that ensures we all use VMWare instead.

    Let me put it this way. Disable sleep / hibernation should be an option the user can tick / untick. Think of it this way. if the user decides to hypernate / sleep a laptop when a VM is running treat that as a power off on the VM - Who cares.

    Great Hyper-V is intended for servers which will never be hibernated or put in sleep mode. Brilliant but what about the developers who form the basis upon which companies decide to deploy Hyper-V. if the developers don't use it then don't expect any adoption either. Disabling a users choice to take a risk is never an option. The user always has a choice - in this case the choice is to use VMWare instead.

    This single dumb feature is almost in parallel to the mind-blowingly unusable User Interfaces on media software from Sony. In short it prevents people from using your product.

    Sunday, March 13, 2011 10:10 AM
  • VMWare vSphere (ESX) supports sleep?  Or, are you comparing Hyper-V to VMWare Workstation?  They're completely different products, not to mention hypervisor types.

    Sunday, March 13, 2011 9:21 PM
  • I have DELL Vostro 3700 that runs Microsoft Window 7 64 bits and VMWorkstation 7.

    Can you tell how to configure Window Server 2008 Hyper-V.

    When I added a role  Hyper-V in my Window Server 2008 R2 DataCenter, I run into errors of:

    “The processor on this computer is not compatible with Hyper-V.  To install role,

    The processor must have a support version of hardware assisted virtualization and that feature must be turned on in the BIOS”

    I went to BIOS and not sure the features to be turned on.

    Please help and advice.

    Many thanks in advance.

    -Edwin

    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 5:15 PM
  • Running Hyper-V in VMWare Workstation is unsupported and somewhat unstable if you can get it to work.

    You can try these instructions: http://www.veeam.com/blog/nesting-hyper-v-with-vmware-workstation-8-and-esxi-5.html

    But, you're better off in a VMWare forum for this...remember this is completely unsupported.

    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 5:25 PM
  • If I plan to purchase a new notebook.

    Will the Microsoft Window Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V runs?

    Thanks for your kind helps.

    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 6:33 PM
  • If the laptop meets the requirements.  There's a big difference running Hyper-V on hardware, you realize that it is it's own OS?  It doesn't run on Windows 7 as an application.

    Hyper-V Server 2008 Requirements"

    Processor : x64 compatible processor with Intel VT or AMD-V technology enabled.
    Hardware Data Execution Prevention (DEP), specifically Intel XD bit (execute disable bit) or AMD NX bit (no execute bit), must be available and enabled.
    Minimum CPU speed : 1.4 GHz; Recommended: 2 GHz or faster

    RAM : Minimum: 1 GB RAM; Recommended: 2 GB RAM or greater (additional RAM is required for each running guest operating system); Maximum 1 TB

    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 7:16 PM
  • Does anyone know a way to "shut down hyper-v and enable hibernation" without restarting the computer?
    I would love the solution provider forever...
    Thursday, March 1, 2012 9:45 PM
  • Now that Windows 8 consumer preview has been released, you can try Client Hyper-V on your laptop: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/7704.client-hyper-v-survival-guide.aspx


    tony soper

    • Proposed as answer by tonysoper_MSFT Thursday, March 1, 2012 10:02 PM
    Thursday, March 1, 2012 10:02 PM
  • I switched to using VirtualBox and have been very happy.  I plan on switching to Hyper-V in Windows 8 as soon as it RTMs.

    Shan McArthur www.shanmcarthur.net Check out the commercial edition of xRM portals @ www.adxstudio.com

    Thursday, March 1, 2012 10:09 PM