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How to find the server i'm connected to

    Question

  • When troubleshooting a dfs or in this case the \\domain\NETLOGON folder, how do you find which server your computer is looking to for those files.

    Currently if it's a file descrepency we've manually looked at each server to find the odd one. If we're troubleshooting a slow connection, we've added a file to one server at a time before they replicate, to see if it shows up on the clients machine.

    There has to be an easier way to see which server the client is connected to.
    Wednesday, April 15, 2009 7:49 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

    Right clicking + properties at the folder should show a DFS tab. Here you should see the active server.
    Remember that NETLOGON could be using FRS (not DFS-R) if you're not running Windows Server 2008 native Mode.
    Still the DFS tab shoud show up anyway and help with your problem.

    Jens Ole Kragh MCITP, MCTS, MCT http://jensolekragh.spaces.live.com/
    • Marked as answer by theameoba Thursday, April 16, 2009 12:13 AM
    • Marked as answer by theameoba Thursday, April 16, 2009 12:13 AM
    Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:48 AM
  • Hi,

     

    Concerning the question, based on the research, there are three target selection methods for client computer to locate the root server in a DFS environment. These selection methods includes: default target selection, same-site target selection, and least expensive target selection.

     

    For more detailed information about the logic that DFS uses to sort targets in a referral, please see the section "How Target Selection Works" in the following TechNet online document.

     

    How DFS Works

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc782417.aspx

    Hope it helps.


    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    • Proposed as answer by Jens Ole Kragh Thursday, April 16, 2009 8:15 AM
    • Marked as answer by David Shen Friday, April 17, 2009 1:54 AM
    Thursday, April 16, 2009 8:11 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    Right clicking + properties at the folder should show a DFS tab. Here you should see the active server.
    Remember that NETLOGON could be using FRS (not DFS-R) if you're not running Windows Server 2008 native Mode.
    Still the DFS tab shoud show up anyway and help with your problem.

    Jens Ole Kragh MCITP, MCTS, MCT http://jensolekragh.spaces.live.com/
    • Marked as answer by theameoba Thursday, April 16, 2009 12:13 AM
    • Marked as answer by theameoba Thursday, April 16, 2009 12:13 AM
    Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:48 AM
  •  

     

    Hi theanmeoba,

     

    Generally speaking, there are 3 ways for us to check which servers the client computer actually logon.

     

    Method1. Run "Gpresult /v > C:\gp.txt" (without quotation mark) on the client, you may find the domain controller name after the stings "Group Policy was applied from" within the gp.txt file.

     

    Method2. Run "Set" (without quotation mark) in the command line prompt on the client, you may find the "LOGONSERVER" which tell us which server the client logon.

    Method3. Run "dfsutil /pktinfo" without quotation mark) in the command line prompt on the client, you may find the server name which the client actually connect to \\domain\NETLOGON

    Please note: to use dfsutil on Windows XP or Windows Vista box, you may need to install the Windows Server 2003 support tool first.


    Download: Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1 Support Tools

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/892777


    Moreover, I agree with Jens, you can use FRS to replicate the NETLOGON folder which is within the SVSVOL folder among multiple domain controllers when the domain controllers are not running in Windows Server 2008 native Mode.

    Hope it helps.


    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

     

    Wednesday, April 15, 2009 9:26 AM
  • Thanks for the help,

    Another question on this topic, how does the window decide which server to connect to? Not all our clients are looking to their local copy of the files and i'd like to understand the selection process so we can stop clients contacting servers that are across the country when they have a local one.

    Thanks,
    Thursday, April 16, 2009 12:13 AM
  • Hi,

     

    Concerning the question, based on the research, there are three target selection methods for client computer to locate the root server in a DFS environment. These selection methods includes: default target selection, same-site target selection, and least expensive target selection.

     

    For more detailed information about the logic that DFS uses to sort targets in a referral, please see the section "How Target Selection Works" in the following TechNet online document.

     

    How DFS Works

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc782417.aspx

    Hope it helps.


    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    • Proposed as answer by Jens Ole Kragh Thursday, April 16, 2009 8:15 AM
    • Marked as answer by David Shen Friday, April 17, 2009 1:54 AM
    Thursday, April 16, 2009 8:11 AM
  • Dear All,

    Simply type " SET L " on command prompt. It will show which domain controller you are connected to.

    Eg:

    C:\Users\UserName>SET L

    LOCALAPPDATA=C:\Users\UserName\AppData\Local
    LOGONSERVER=\\DomainController

    REGARDS

    RIYAZ AHAMED

    Sunday, September 9, 2012 2:22 PM