none
Branchcache or DFS/DFS-R RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am in the process of opening a new branch office at our job, and was wondering whether I should implement the new Branch Cache feature or stick with DFS/DFS-R.

    What are the advantage of choosing either one of the technology.

    Regards

    JP
    Monday, August 17, 2009 6:21 PM

Answers

  •  

    Hi,

    Thanks for the post.

     

    If you just request files access from central office, you may just use BranchCache Technology.

     

    For your information, here is the side-by-side comparison of BranchCache and DFSR

     

     

    BranchCache

    DFSR

    Hardware infrastructure required

    None, if running in Distributed Cache Mode

    Need file server in branch office

    Types of data cached

    SMB2, HTTP, HTTPS

    SMB1 and SMB2

    What drives caching

    User reading data brings data into cache

    Administrator defines data set to be replicated and replication schedule

    Cache lifetime

    “Least recently used” data is evicted from the cache when under disk pressure. Otherwise, data not accessed in 28 days is aged out

    Data never expires

    File version seen by clients

    Clients get latest content from central server

    Clients see version of content that has been replicated to branch

    When do branch modifications get back to central server

    Modifications go directly to central server (over WAN) as the client makes the modification

    Modifications are stored in branch replica and replicated back to central server based on admin configured replication schedule

    Resilient to WAN outage

    No

    Yes

     

    Hope this helps.

     

    • Marked as answer by Miles Zhang Monday, August 24, 2009 1:39 AM
    Friday, August 21, 2009 9:08 AM
  • Hi,

     

    Thanks for the post.

     

    Please understand that BranchCache complements DFSR and ISA caching and BranchCache stores only intranet data (for both HTTP and SMB protocols), and does not store data that is downloaded from the Internet. It supports distribution of files using the SMB protocol only on the read-path (for two-way synchronization over WAN links, consider using DFS Replication).

     

    In addition, BranchCache requires clients running Windows 7. Windows Server 2008 R2 is required on content servers located in the datacenter (the targeted share) as well as on servers hosting caches.

     

    For your information, BranchCache provides the following two Deployment Methods:

     

    Distributed cache mode: A cache is distributed among Windows 7 branch office clients

     

    Hosted cache mode: A Windows Server 2008 R2 server houses a cache

     

    ***********************

     

    Hosted cache provides a central location for the cache and the following benefits:

     

    ·         Increased availability With a Hosted Cache, the server can be always on and provide better WAN link utilization. Client computers can hibernate, shut down, and roam without affecting the availability of cached content. With a distributed cache, content stored on these clients would not be available.

    ·         Increased reliability There should be fewer services and applications running on a server hosting a cache. In addition, the service level agreement (SLA) on the server is likely to be better than when the cache is hosted across client computers. This leads to better reliability and turn-around time if there are issues.

    ·         Caching for the entire branch office A Hosted Cache can reduce WAN traffic across the entire branch office, whereas the Distributed Cache model is scoped to a single subnet in the branch office.

    Distributed cache offers the following benefits:

     

    ·         Easy set up A distributed cache is easy to deploy using Group Policy. A Hosted Cache requires that a server is set up and that a certificate is bound to the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL).

    ·         No server dependency A distributed cache is convenient for branch offices that do not have a server in the office. The cache is distributed across the users’ computers. However, only users who use the same subnet can access the cache.

     

    Hope this helps.

    • Marked as answer by Miles Zhang Monday, August 24, 2009 1:39 AM
    Tuesday, August 18, 2009 10:04 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

     

    Thanks for the post.

     

    Please understand that BranchCache complements DFSR and ISA caching and BranchCache stores only intranet data (for both HTTP and SMB protocols), and does not store data that is downloaded from the Internet. It supports distribution of files using the SMB protocol only on the read-path (for two-way synchronization over WAN links, consider using DFS Replication).

     

    In addition, BranchCache requires clients running Windows 7. Windows Server 2008 R2 is required on content servers located in the datacenter (the targeted share) as well as on servers hosting caches.

     

    For your information, BranchCache provides the following two Deployment Methods:

     

    Distributed cache mode: A cache is distributed among Windows 7 branch office clients

     

    Hosted cache mode: A Windows Server 2008 R2 server houses a cache

     

    ***********************

     

    Hosted cache provides a central location for the cache and the following benefits:

     

    ·         Increased availability With a Hosted Cache, the server can be always on and provide better WAN link utilization. Client computers can hibernate, shut down, and roam without affecting the availability of cached content. With a distributed cache, content stored on these clients would not be available.

    ·         Increased reliability There should be fewer services and applications running on a server hosting a cache. In addition, the service level agreement (SLA) on the server is likely to be better than when the cache is hosted across client computers. This leads to better reliability and turn-around time if there are issues.

    ·         Caching for the entire branch office A Hosted Cache can reduce WAN traffic across the entire branch office, whereas the Distributed Cache model is scoped to a single subnet in the branch office.

    Distributed cache offers the following benefits:

     

    ·         Easy set up A distributed cache is easy to deploy using Group Policy. A Hosted Cache requires that a server is set up and that a certificate is bound to the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL).

    ·         No server dependency A distributed cache is convenient for branch offices that do not have a server in the office. The cache is distributed across the users’ computers. However, only users who use the same subnet can access the cache.

     

    Hope this helps.

    • Marked as answer by Miles Zhang Monday, August 24, 2009 1:39 AM
    Tuesday, August 18, 2009 10:04 AM
  •  

    Hi,

     

    I just want to check if the information provided was helpful. If there is any update on this issue, please feel free to let me know.

     

    We are looking forward to your reply.

     

    Miles Zhang

    Windows Server Print/Fax Forum

    If you have any feedback on our support, please contact tngfb@microsoft.com  

     

    ********************************************

    Hope we can receive more and more feedbacks from VERY SATISFIED customers. :-)

    Thursday, August 20, 2009 1:54 AM
  • Hi Miles

    Thanks for your response.

    That answer partially my question.

    Lets say all my client at the branch are all Windows 7. (50 clients)
    Lets say that my content server at the central location is a windows 2008 R2.

    DFS is already setup at central location.

    I want to add a new server at the branch for files access.

    Should I go ahead and configure DFS-R between the branch and the central location
    Or should I use Branch Cache technology?

    Best regards

    JP
    Thursday, August 20, 2009 2:11 AM
  •  

    Hi,

    Thanks for the post.

     

    If you just request files access from central office, you may just use BranchCache Technology.

     

    For your information, here is the side-by-side comparison of BranchCache and DFSR

     

     

    BranchCache

    DFSR

    Hardware infrastructure required

    None, if running in Distributed Cache Mode

    Need file server in branch office

    Types of data cached

    SMB2, HTTP, HTTPS

    SMB1 and SMB2

    What drives caching

    User reading data brings data into cache

    Administrator defines data set to be replicated and replication schedule

    Cache lifetime

    “Least recently used” data is evicted from the cache when under disk pressure. Otherwise, data not accessed in 28 days is aged out

    Data never expires

    File version seen by clients

    Clients get latest content from central server

    Clients see version of content that has been replicated to branch

    When do branch modifications get back to central server

    Modifications go directly to central server (over WAN) as the client makes the modification

    Modifications are stored in branch replica and replicated back to central server based on admin configured replication schedule

    Resilient to WAN outage

    No

    Yes

     

    Hope this helps.

     

    • Marked as answer by Miles Zhang Monday, August 24, 2009 1:39 AM
    Friday, August 21, 2009 9:08 AM
  • Excellent

    Exactly what I was looking for.

    Best regards

    JP
    Monday, August 24, 2009 3:07 AM
  • Hi,

    I am glad to hear that the information was helpful to you.

    Hope you will enjoy our TechNet Forum.

    Thanks,

    Miles

    Tuesday, August 25, 2009 12:56 AM