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Replace Server 2003 with Server 2008 - Dual NIC - Clients cannot access gateway IP address

    Question

  • Hi,

    I have a Server 2003 with dual NICs that I have been asked to replace with Server 2008 with dual NICs.  I "inherited" this task from the former IT person who is long gone.

    One NIC on the Server 2003 has IP address 90.0.0.1.  There is no gateway IP specified for this NIC nor is there an IP address for DNS. The client machines are all 90.0.0.x.  This is the internal network.  These are all manually configured IP addresses and connect through a network switch.

    The other NIC on the Server 2003 has IP address 192.168.1.110.  The gateway is 192.168.1.1 which is the Linksys router.  The DNS for this NIC comes from the ISP via the router.  This NIC gets the IP addresses from DHCP on the router.

    The client machines are set to use the Server 2003 IP address for both the gateway and the DNS.  All above the above works fine as is.  The client machines can access the Internet just fine.

    When I configure the Server 2008 in the same way as the Server 2003 the client machines cannot find the Internet.  A tracert command times out trying to make the jump from the 90.0.0.x IP address on the one NIC on the Server 2008 to the 192.168.1.1 gateway IP address on the second NIC on the Server 2008.

    I would just like to know what it is that is different about the Server 2008 that is preventing it from supplying the gateway IP address to the client machines.  I would prefer to not change any settings or cabling, etc, other than something to be able to get the clients to be able to find the gateway IP address that leads to the Internet.  What is the difference in how Server 2008 works in this regard versus Server 2003?

     

    Thanks! Kev

     

    Saturday, September 17, 2011 5:51 PM

Answers

  • Hello,

    as you are building a new server do it the recommended way. It sounds for me that the server is a domain controller and not a workgroup server.

    Multi-homing DCs is not recommended and result in multiple problems.

    In your case use the following scenario:

    internet > rotuer WAN port > router LAN port > switch > all domain machines with one subnet in your case use 192.168.x.x

    Instead of using the router as DHCP server, disable this, and configure the Windows server 2008 as DHCP server.

    Why will you keep that kind of setup which makes networking more complicated then needed? Please elaborate this.


    Best regards Meinolf Weber Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.
    Saturday, September 17, 2011 6:22 PM
  • Hi Kev,

    Thank you for your post.

    Like Meinolf mentioned, Multi-homing DCs is not recommended and result in DNS problems. So your clients could forward ip address to Internet but not forward URL caused by DNS resolution problem.

    If you would like to use AD & DNS & RRAS & Dual NIC, you must disable DNS registration on external NIC and adjust your DNS server configuration. More details please look at KB272294 and Ace blog article.

    If there is any update on this issue, please feel free to let us know.


    Regards,
    Rick Tan
    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 5:27 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hello,

    as you are building a new server do it the recommended way. It sounds for me that the server is a domain controller and not a workgroup server.

    Multi-homing DCs is not recommended and result in multiple problems.

    In your case use the following scenario:

    internet > rotuer WAN port > router LAN port > switch > all domain machines with one subnet in your case use 192.168.x.x

    Instead of using the router as DHCP server, disable this, and configure the Windows server 2008 as DHCP server.

    Why will you keep that kind of setup which makes networking more complicated then needed? Please elaborate this.


    Best regards Meinolf Weber Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.
    Saturday, September 17, 2011 6:22 PM
  • Adding to Meinolf's comments; basically your DHCP server must hand out static address of AD server as primary DNS server address so clients can find DC and logon to domain. Then put the ISP's DNS addresses in the forward lookup of your DNS server so clients can find internet. Also make sure your server has static IP address outside of DHCP scope.

     

     

     

     


    Regards, Dave Patrick ....
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft MVP [Windows]
    Saturday, September 17, 2011 6:31 PM
  • I appreciate your prompt response.  Yes, the Server 2003 and the Server 2008 are domain controllers.

    Your suggestions are a lot like many I have seen as I have tried to research this issue.  That is to reconfigure everything from scratch to make things better.

    My customer has limited financial resources and would balk at big changes.  Therefore I would prefer just to be able to replicate the current setup by making it work with the Server 2008.

    So, I would like to know why a client machine can hit the NIC with IP address 90.0.0.x on the Server 2008, but not make the jump to the Internet gateway on the second NIC on that Server 2008 machine?  This works on the Server 2003 so why does it not work on Server 2008?  Should there not be something on the Server2008 that says when a client machine tries to get to google.com by hitting 90.0.0.x on the server, then the Server 2008 should determine that must mean it should use the second NIC with a valid gateway IP address to provide access to google.com?  Pardon my ignorance, but that sounds pretty simple and it must be since it already does this somehow with the old Server 2003 machine setup.

    Saturday, September 17, 2011 6:42 PM
  • Hello,

    as with that amount of machines a switch already should exist i can not see any additional cost. Clients can be configured with DHCP from the server and you are done.


    Best regards Meinolf Weber Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.
    Saturday, September 17, 2011 6:47 PM
  • Switches are already present so you are correct there is no hardware cost.  Labor is still a cost factor, however. I am just trying to find the easiest way to make this work by doing some setup on the Server 2008 versus going to every client machine and reconfiguring the client NIC to get theirs IP address from DHCP.  It would be great to be able to make whatever change/setting is needed on the Server 2008 to make it work like the Server 2003 currently works so well.
    Sunday, September 18, 2011 1:34 AM
  • Hi Kev,

    Thank you for your post.

    Like Meinolf mentioned, Multi-homing DCs is not recommended and result in DNS problems. So your clients could forward ip address to Internet but not forward URL caused by DNS resolution problem.

    If you would like to use AD & DNS & RRAS & Dual NIC, you must disable DNS registration on external NIC and adjust your DNS server configuration. More details please look at KB272294 and Ace blog article.

    If there is any update on this issue, please feel free to let us know.


    Regards,
    Rick Tan
    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 5:27 AM
    Moderator
  • Dual NIC is not recommended, see this

    http://msmvps.com/blogs/acefekay/archive/2009/08/17/multihomed-dcs-with-dns-rras-and-or-pppoe-adapters.aspx


    Best regards Biswajit Biswas Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights. MCP 2003,MCSA 2003, MCSA:M 2003, CCNA, MCTS, Enterprise Admin
    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 12:16 PM
  • Thank you all for the advice and the links. I have much to learn. As I mentioned I inherited this setup and have no particular vested interest in preserving it as the Server 2003 is replaced by the Server 2008. My instructions were to just set everything up the same and make it work at the lowest cost in my time and effort. My customer will probably not like the fact it may have been set up improperly in the past and needs to be re-configured according to current best practices. I always try to figure out the easy path of just finding that one setting that will magically make things work. In this case the key seems to be missing, i.e., why can't the client PCs get the gateway IP address from the second NIC on the Server 2008 when they can get it on the Server 2003? I'll still be wondering about the answer to that when all is said and done. Best, Kev
    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 3:30 PM