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Upgrading to Windows 10 using WSUS doesn't work RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi

    I am trying to deploy the upgrade to Windows 10 to a test client running Windows 7 Professional Retail license (activated) in a virtual machine for testing purposes, but it doesn’t seem to be installing Windows 10. It appears to have downloaded the files, I can see the ESD in C:\$WINDOWS~BT, and the WindowsUpdateBox.exe in the SoftwareDistribution\Download\GUID folder.

    I installed KB3095113 on my Server 2012 R2 WSUS server before I selected the Upgrade product group and synchronised, as instructed in the Blog and KB article. However I have ran the powershell commands anyway to clear this out and reset it in case there was a problem, but it’s still not installing on my client (http://blogs.technet.com/b/wsus/archive/2016/01/30/quot-help-i-synched-upgrades-too-soon-quot.aspx).

    This is a brand new build of Windows 7 Pro (all the updates), activated, and about 30GB free space. I can see the machine report into the WSUS console and when I click to see why it failed to install I can see it states “Download succeeded” whereas earlier it says download failed, but I have since added the ESD as a MIME type in IIS on my WSUS server. So it is getting further than it was before. I have also approved the upgrade for this machine, as WSUS synchronises many versions of Windows 10, I first approved the Windows 10 Pro en-GB Retail but the client reported into WSUS requesting en-US Retail so I approved that also.

    My WindowsUpdate.log, setupact.log and setuperr.log files are in the link below.

    http://1drv.ms/1nIBR0D

    Many thanks

    Steve


    Monday, March 14, 2016 12:55 PM

Answers

  • I have discovered that if you use WSUS to deploy Windows 10, you must manually initiate the upgrade process yourself. Perhaps this is because of such a huge change in the underlying OS it requires the users permission to proceed. Of course, you can use MDT and zero touch automate it like i did for Windows 7/8/8.1 machines.

    If you use WSUS to deploy Windows 10 it is automated, when the client checks in for updates it will download and install the upgrade. What's a little disappointing about the upgrade procedure (as seen as an update) is it requires an awful lot of downtime for the end user during the upgrade, considering there is still a massive amount of code unchanged from build to build. upgrading like a service pack (which is almost what a new build of windows 10 is lets be honest) is far less disruptive.

    I can't see how organisations can control deployment of Windows 10 as it stands as a full in-place upgrade using WSUS because you can not guarantee when the upgrade will occur on the client, yes you can target groups but you're not deploying it like you deploy smaller patches then, it becomes much more time consuming to target, deploy and check all is well. a user could shut down their PC at the end of the day and part of the upgrade occurs, but when they turn it on the next morning they could be faced with the black screen and circle with the percentage progress - this cost a user 20-30 minutes easily of lost productivity and that's a bit of a concern. Might be acceptable for small businesses maybe with largely laptop users (because it will be much more staggered and less impact) but for those companies with huge amounts of desktops and fixed starting times for employees i cant see WSUS being of any value, for that size business you need MDT or system center configuration manager to gain far greater control over the upgrade.

    conclusion: WSUS doesnt automate windows 7/8/8.1 upgrades to 10, but it will go from Windows 10 build 10240 to 10586 automatically

    Thursday, March 24, 2016 7:58 PM
  • Just to further add to this thread. I have done a test with deploying Windows 10 10586 to a system running 10240 to see what disruption it causes - quite a lot to the end user actually.

    I targeted this one user because he was on annual leave for a week, but i let the system automatically download it and didn't manually click the restart when prompted, i simply shut down the system and let it do it's own thing naturally. the user came back, worked on the machine and shut down - did this each day for a week. On Friday he shut his machine down as normal, nothing odd here, but on Monday it took an hour for him to be able to use his system. as soon as he turned it on the upgrading windows phase showed up with the black screen and percentage in a circle.

    A word of warning: if you're going to deploy Windows upgrades using WSUS expect a lot of complaints, lost productivity and possibly a disciplinary. You must plan and communicate to your end users clearly through this process, targeting small groups of users and getting them to go to settings - updates, and hitting that restart button on their terms.

    deploying Windows via WSUS is a nice idea, it removes lots of back-end complexity and opens up automated deployment to those who don't have any other deployment products, but you have to instead spend the time on the careful management of the process.

    I highly doubt that large businesses who have MDT or SCCM would bother using WSUS as their method of OS deployment, stick with your existing OS deployment tools if you use them.

    Steve

    Wednesday, April 6, 2016 10:40 AM

All replies

  • I don't think you can upgrade OS using WSUS only. i believe you need MDT or SCCM to push the upgrade.

    check this question

    https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windowsserver/en-US/9f75ec31-2837-452a-8bcd-6e173426e7a5/upgrade-win7-to-win10-with-wsus?forum=winserverwsus


    Best Sam ------------------------------------------------ Please mark as answered if this solves your issue


    • Edited by SamShoa Monday, March 14, 2016 3:38 PM
    Monday, March 14, 2016 3:37 PM
  • I'm not sure why Windows 10 is being offered by WSUS and shows as being application to Windows 7, 8 and 8.1 machines then. I dont think this is the right answer. the thread you referenced was from a time before the Upgrades category was introduced (i think in December 2015) by installing the patch mentioned in my initial post.

    Steve

    Monday, March 14, 2016 4:01 PM
  • Hi Steve Mills,

    >the thread you referenced was from a time before the Upgrades category was introduced (i think in December 2015) by installing the patch mentioned in my initial post.

    Yes, you are right, WSUS could upgrade to Win10.

    However, many cases indicate that after downloading the Upgrade on window 7, we need to install it manually.

    Win10 1511, how do we force an automatic install:

    https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windowsserver/en-US/4b9e9f11-8e63-4c7d-a380-1e5781c6a815/win10-1511-how-do-we-force-an-automatic-install?forum=winserverwsus

    And we may check the following prerequisites:

    1. For windows 7, the version wuaueng.dll needs to greater than or equal to 7.6.7601.19016 and less than or equal to 9599;

    2. For window 8.1, the version wuaueng.dll needs to greater than or equal to 7.6.9600.18066 and less than or equal to 10239;

    3. Registry key in Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate:

    "DisableOSUpgrade"=false

    "DeferUpgrade"="false"

    "RequireDeferUpgrade"="false"

    Registry key in Software\Microsoft\WindowsUpdate\UX\Settings:

    "DeferUpgrade"="false"

    I descripted it in another similar post, attach here for your reference:

    https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windowsserver/en-US/66542445-5070-4176-9bc7-8fec766befa6/windows-10-1511-not-deploying?forum=winserverwsus

    Feel free to feed back.

    Best Regards,

    Anne


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.


    Tuesday, March 15, 2016 1:55 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi

    It seems that your comment on the other thread has got me a little further along.

    Check if the registry key "DisableOSUpgrade" is set to 1, if yes, change it to 0. The key's location:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\POLICIES\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate
    If the key is set to "0", and it still doesn't work, then we may add a registry key AllowOSUpgrade to:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsUpdate\OSUpgrade, create DWORD AllowOSUpgrade, set value to 1.

    The upgrade is now appearing in Windows Update control panel applet like it does for home users, with the "Get Started" button ready to click. but this still seems to require manual intervention to initiate it. The shutdown button shows the orange update warning symbol as if to indicate it will install the update, but this doesnt actually happen when i shutdown the system.

    Also the two registry keys you mentioned, can these be set by group policy? even though I have the latest ADMX files from the latest Windows 10 build, i can't see a policy setting that would apply these?


    Tuesday, March 15, 2016 8:38 AM
  • Hi Steve Mills,

    >Also the two registry keys you mentioned, can these be set by group policy? even though I have the latest ADMX files from the latest Windows 10 build, i can't see a policy setting that would apply these?

    I also didn't find any policy that could affect these registry keys, so it seems we couldn't set it by GPO.

    And the registry key is used to enable there's no key to protect the computer from upgrading.

    Best Regards,

    Anne


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Wednesday, March 16, 2016 2:22 AM
    Moderator
  • I think this may be what we have been waiting for, this seemed to synchronize last night so I'm just about to test it. Perhaps the original Windows 10 builds in the list were to go from RTM to November 1511 build?

    I still currently have the registry settings configured previously so testing if this will automate the install or not, and then i will put the machine back to Windows 7 and try without the registry settings. The title of that upgrade though looks rather promising. The previous one did work from Windows 7 but I had to click the "Get Started" button in order to get the installation going. Wait and see what happens with this one I guess.

    Steve

    Wednesday, March 16, 2016 9:40 AM
  • Hi Steve,

    >I still currently have the registry settings configured previously so testing if this will automate the install or not, and then i will put the machine back to Windows 7 and try without the registry settings

    Do you get the result about your test? Feel free to feed back.

    Best Regards,

    Anne


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Tuesday, March 22, 2016 3:24 AM
    Moderator
  • I have discovered that if you use WSUS to deploy Windows 10, you must manually initiate the upgrade process yourself. Perhaps this is because of such a huge change in the underlying OS it requires the users permission to proceed. Of course, you can use MDT and zero touch automate it like i did for Windows 7/8/8.1 machines.

    If you use WSUS to deploy Windows 10 it is automated, when the client checks in for updates it will download and install the upgrade. What's a little disappointing about the upgrade procedure (as seen as an update) is it requires an awful lot of downtime for the end user during the upgrade, considering there is still a massive amount of code unchanged from build to build. upgrading like a service pack (which is almost what a new build of windows 10 is lets be honest) is far less disruptive.

    I can't see how organisations can control deployment of Windows 10 as it stands as a full in-place upgrade using WSUS because you can not guarantee when the upgrade will occur on the client, yes you can target groups but you're not deploying it like you deploy smaller patches then, it becomes much more time consuming to target, deploy and check all is well. a user could shut down their PC at the end of the day and part of the upgrade occurs, but when they turn it on the next morning they could be faced with the black screen and circle with the percentage progress - this cost a user 20-30 minutes easily of lost productivity and that's a bit of a concern. Might be acceptable for small businesses maybe with largely laptop users (because it will be much more staggered and less impact) but for those companies with huge amounts of desktops and fixed starting times for employees i cant see WSUS being of any value, for that size business you need MDT or system center configuration manager to gain far greater control over the upgrade.

    conclusion: WSUS doesnt automate windows 7/8/8.1 upgrades to 10, but it will go from Windows 10 build 10240 to 10586 automatically

    Thursday, March 24, 2016 7:58 PM
  • Hi Steve Mills,

    Your feed back is highly appreciated. It will be helpful for others.

    Thanks again for your sharing.

    Best Regards,

    Anne


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Monday, March 28, 2016 2:26 AM
    Moderator
  • Just to further add to this thread. I have done a test with deploying Windows 10 10586 to a system running 10240 to see what disruption it causes - quite a lot to the end user actually.

    I targeted this one user because he was on annual leave for a week, but i let the system automatically download it and didn't manually click the restart when prompted, i simply shut down the system and let it do it's own thing naturally. the user came back, worked on the machine and shut down - did this each day for a week. On Friday he shut his machine down as normal, nothing odd here, but on Monday it took an hour for him to be able to use his system. as soon as he turned it on the upgrading windows phase showed up with the black screen and percentage in a circle.

    A word of warning: if you're going to deploy Windows upgrades using WSUS expect a lot of complaints, lost productivity and possibly a disciplinary. You must plan and communicate to your end users clearly through this process, targeting small groups of users and getting them to go to settings - updates, and hitting that restart button on their terms.

    deploying Windows via WSUS is a nice idea, it removes lots of back-end complexity and opens up automated deployment to those who don't have any other deployment products, but you have to instead spend the time on the careful management of the process.

    I highly doubt that large businesses who have MDT or SCCM would bother using WSUS as their method of OS deployment, stick with your existing OS deployment tools if you use them.

    Steve

    Wednesday, April 6, 2016 10:40 AM