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Exchange 2013 - Outlook 2007 - Server name GUID RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi Guys.

    I am hoping someone can shine some light on something for me.

    Right now I have the following with roles.

    1 x Exchange 2010 - MBX & CAS

    1x Exchange 2013 - MBX

    1 x Exchange 2013 - CAS

    Mix of Outlook 2007 & 2010

    I migrated a user from Exchange 2010 over to Exchange 2013 and the process went fine. Email flow is working, OWA and Active Sync again working ok.

    However when we opened Outlook 2007 it displayed a message to say an Administrator had made changes and we needed to restart Outlook. No issues there.

    Outlook connected up fine and everything works. However when you look in the mail profile for the Exchange server name i see something like 11d2e6a3-4123-4172-a781-1021d9932124@domain.com

    Also Outlook Anywhere is ticked and when you untick it from the client and then open it again it comes back.

    Are the above items of migration?

    Friday, July 5, 2013 1:18 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    RPC is no longer a supported direct access protocol. This means that all Outlook connectivity must take place using RPC over HTTP (also known as Outlook Anywhere).


    Outlook clients no longer connect to a server FQDN as they have done in all previous versions of Exchange. Outlook uses Autodiscover to create a new connection point comprised of mailbox GUID, @ symbol, and the domain portion of the user’s primary SMTP address.

    Both the above sections is copied from What's New in Exchange 2013, Exchange 2013 Architecture


    Martina Miskovic

    • Marked as answer by cara chen Sunday, July 14, 2013 1:43 AM
    Friday, July 5, 2013 2:52 PM
  • With Exchange 2013 the users Exchange Guid is now the RPC endpoint. This is an expected behavior. The CAS infrastructure directs the user to whichever server their mailbox resides on at the moment the request comes through, allowing for greater resiliency.

    From the Exchange Server Team - http://blogs.technet.com/b/exchange/archive/2013/01/25/exchange-2013-client-access-server-role.aspx

    So instead, we changed the model. We no longer use a FQDN for the RPC endpoint. Instead we now use a GUID. The mailbox GUID, to be precise (along with a domain suffix to support multi-tenant scenarios). The mailbox GUID is unique within the (tenant) organization, so regardless of where the database is activated and mounted, CAS can discover the location and proxy the request to the correct MBX2013 server.


    • Edited by David (DK) Friday, July 5, 2013 2:53 PM Add reference
    • Marked as answer by cara chen Sunday, July 14, 2013 1:43 AM
    Friday, July 5, 2013 2:52 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    RPC is no longer a supported direct access protocol. This means that all Outlook connectivity must take place using RPC over HTTP (also known as Outlook Anywhere).


    Outlook clients no longer connect to a server FQDN as they have done in all previous versions of Exchange. Outlook uses Autodiscover to create a new connection point comprised of mailbox GUID, @ symbol, and the domain portion of the user’s primary SMTP address.

    Both the above sections is copied from What's New in Exchange 2013, Exchange 2013 Architecture


    Martina Miskovic

    • Marked as answer by cara chen Sunday, July 14, 2013 1:43 AM
    Friday, July 5, 2013 2:52 PM
  • With Exchange 2013 the users Exchange Guid is now the RPC endpoint. This is an expected behavior. The CAS infrastructure directs the user to whichever server their mailbox resides on at the moment the request comes through, allowing for greater resiliency.

    From the Exchange Server Team - http://blogs.technet.com/b/exchange/archive/2013/01/25/exchange-2013-client-access-server-role.aspx

    So instead, we changed the model. We no longer use a FQDN for the RPC endpoint. Instead we now use a GUID. The mailbox GUID, to be precise (along with a domain suffix to support multi-tenant scenarios). The mailbox GUID is unique within the (tenant) organization, so regardless of where the database is activated and mounted, CAS can discover the location and proxy the request to the correct MBX2013 server.


    • Edited by David (DK) Friday, July 5, 2013 2:53 PM Add reference
    • Marked as answer by cara chen Sunday, July 14, 2013 1:43 AM
    Friday, July 5, 2013 2:52 PM
  • Thank you for the reply.

    OK So long as this is expected to happen then im cool with that.

    Friday, July 5, 2013 2:54 PM
  • HI Martina,

    We are having the same environment as said above in the first post, We are getting the server name instead of Exchange GUID, when we are configuring outlook.

    Any suggestiong on this will grtfull :)

    Regards 

    Sunil

    Tuesday, September 24, 2013 11:21 AM
  • Hi,

    RPC is no longer a supported direct access protocol. This means that all Outlook connectivity must take place using RPC over HTTP (also known as Outlook Anywhere).


    Outlook clients no longer connect to a server FQDN as they have done in all previous versions of Exchange. Outlook uses Autodiscover to create a new connection point comprised of mailbox GUID, @ symbol, and the domain portion of the user’s primary SMTP address.


    To expand on this a little bit, I worked an issue with a new Exchange 2013 environment for 3 days before figuring out that you do NOT specify a server name where it asks for it in Outlook, you use the format mentioned above.  

    For reference, I received a very particular error from testconnectivity.microsoft.com that made no sense until I discovered the server name format.  If a test fails with a 404 HTTP Not Found error and an X-CasErrorCode of MailboxGuidWithDomainNotFound, this is most likely your problem.  Its very frustrating that Microsoft does not have it documented anywhere exactly what this error means, would have saved me a lot of time and energy.

    Thursday, January 23, 2014 7:12 PM